Posts Tagged ‘DERI’

Bill McDaniel, a Star in the Semantic Cosmos, Winks Out but Shines On

[EDITOR’S NOTE: This guest post comes to us from John Breslin. Thanks to John for allowing us to re-post this tribute, which originally appeared in his LinkedIn stream. This post was modified at 5:24 ET]

Photo of Bill McDaniel with StreamGlider logo.It is with deep regret that I learned this week of the passing of my good friend, colleague and StreamGlider co-founder, Bill McDaniel. Bill was, among many other things, a Semantic Web innovator and serial entrepreneur who co-founded a multitude of companies, shipped more than 70 products, and co-authored seven books and many more publications during his career.

I first met Bill McDaniel at the International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC), held in Galway in 2005. Bill was working as a senior research scientist at Adobe at that time. By chance, I happened to be seated across from Bill and another colleague of his from Adobe at the conference dinner, and I mentioned to them both that there were some job opportunities for researchers at DERI in NUI Galway that could be of interest. It turned out to be an opportune time for him to pursue a new challenge, as Bill joined DERI soon afterwards as a project executive in the eLearning Research Cluster.

Those who knew Bill through his Semantic Web work may be unaware of his long and varied career in information technology, with CEO, CTO and CRO roles in diverse areas such as electronic printing, wireless demand chain management, wireless retail loyalty, advanced 2D bar coding, AI-based military logistics, and of course semantically-powered mobile applications.

His career in IT stretches back nearly 40 years to 1975 when he worked as an operations programmer and manager with NCH Corp (at the time, saving the company $1M a year in order processing costs). He then joined Image Sciences in the 1980s as an R&D director, responsible for their $20M flagship product DocuMerge. From then into the 1990s he was CTO and co-owner of GenText, sold to Xenos for $12M in 1998.

Read more

End of Support for the Sindice.com search engine: history, lessons learned, and legacy (Guest Post)

[Editor’s Note: Since 2007, Sindice.com has served as a specialized search engine allowing Semantic Web practitioners and researchers to locate structured data on the Web. At the peak of its activity, Sindice.com had an index of over 700M pages and processed 20M pages per day. In a post last week, the founding team announced the end of support for Sindice.com to concentrate on delivering the technology developed for the engine to enterprise users. This week, SemanticWeb.com is proud to host a guest post by the founding team explaining the history, the challanges and the future of this technology.]

Photo of the Sindice Team, 2012

Photo of the Sindice Team, 2012

The word “Sindice” has been around for quite some time in research and practice on the “Semantic Web” or “lets see how we can turn the web into a database”.

Since 2007, Sindice.com has served as a specialized search engine that would do a crazy thing: throw away the text and just concentrate on the “markup” of the web pages. Sindice would provide an advanced API to query RDF, RDFa, Microformats and Microdata found on web sites, together with a number of other services. Sindice turned useful, we guess, as approximately 1100 scientific works in the last few years refer to it in a way or another.

Last week, we the founding team announced the end of our support of the original Sindice.com semantic search engine to concentrate on the technology that came from it.

With the launch in 2012 of Schema.org, Google and others have effectively embraced the vision of the “Semantic Web.” With the RDFa standard, and now even more with JSON-LD, richer markup is becoming more and more popular on websites. While there might not be public web data “search APIs”, large collections of crawled data (pages and RDF) exist today which are made available on cloud computing platforms for easy analysis with your favorite big data paradigm.

Even more interestingly, the technology of Sindice.com has been made available in several projects maintained either as open source (see below) or commercially supported by the Sindice.com team now transitioned in the Sindice LTD company, AKA SindiceTech.

It has been quite a journey for us, and given there is no single summary anywhere we thought we’d take this occasion to write and share it.

This is both for “historical” reasons and as a way to glimpse at future directions of this field and these technologies.

Read more

SindiceTech Relaunch Features SIREn Search System, PivotBrowser Relational Faceted Browser

sindiceLast week news came from SindiceTech about the availability of its SindiceTech Freebase Distribution for the cloud (see our story here). SindiceTech has finalized its separation from the university setting in which it incubated, the former DERI institute, now a part of the Insight Center for Data Analytics, and now is re-launching its activities, with more new solutions and capabilities on the way.

“The first thing was to launch the Knowledge Graph distribution in the cloud,” says CEO Giovanni Tummarello. “The Freebase distribution showcases how it is possible to quickly have a really large Knowledge Graph in one’s own private cloud space.” The distribution comes instrumented with some of the tools SindiceTech has developed to help users both understand and make use of the data, he says, noting that “the idea of the Knowledge Graph is to have a data integration space that makes it very simple to add new information, but all that power is at risk of being lost without the tools to understand what is in the Knowledge Graph.”

Included in the first round of the distribution’s tools for composing queries and understanding the data as a whole are the Data Types Explorer (in both tabular and graph versions), and the Assisted SPARQL Query Editor. The next releases will increase the number of tools and provide updated data. “Among the tools expected is an advanced Knowledge Graph entity search system based on our newly released SIREn search system,” he says.

Read more

What’s Real In Personalized Mobile Healthcare

rsz_rxNews came this week that a man accused of defrauding a financial group out of close to a million dollars around an investment in a fictional mobile medical device tablet is scheduled to sign a plea agreement admitting that he committed mail fraud. The man, Howard Leventhal, had been promoting the Star Trek-influenced McCoy Home Health Care Tablet as a device that can instantaneously deliver detailed patient information to medical providers. (The product is discussed on the company’s still-surviving web site here.) He was arrested for the fraud in October and has been out on bail.

The interesting thing about this case is that the fake he was perpetrating isn’t very far removed from reality regarding the role mobile apps and systems will play in healthcare. There of course are plenty of mobile apps already available that help users do everything from monitoring their hearts to recording their blood-oxygen level during the night to see whether they have sleep apnea. Research and Markets, for example, says the wireless health market currently will grow to nearly $60 billion by 2018, up from $23.8 billion, with remote patient monitoring applications and diagnostics helping to drive the growth. But where things really get interesting is when mobile health takes on questions of semantic interoperability of accumulated data, and assessing its meaning.

Read more

INSIGHT Centre Answers The Data Analytics Opportunity

rsz_insightpixEarlier this year, leading academics from well-known research centers in Ireland – the Digital Enterprise Research Institute (DERI), Clarity, Clique, 4C and TRIL – came together as part of the INSIGHT Centre for Data Analytics, with £42 million in government funding and £30 million in industry funding. With researchers based in a number of Ireland’s universities, including University College Dublin, Trinity College  Dublin, NUI Galway, NUIMaynooth, Dublin City University, and University College Cork, INSIGHT “is Ireland’s answer to the data analytics opportunity that exists now,” says funding director, Insight Galway, and DERI Director Stefan Decker.

Combining the different centers under one common brand is a way to build critical mass in the areas of Big Data and analytics, spanning categories including recommender systems, media and decision analytics, reasoning, personal sensing, connected health and discovery apps, and, of course, the semantic web and Linked Data, where DERI’s expertise lies, Decker notes. Industry partners are also a large part of the Centre, and will be able to avail themselves of the research expertise transitioning from the various research centers to INSIGHT. For example, the work DERI has been doing on W3C standards will continue under INSIGHT’s purview rather than DERI’s, Decker explains.

Read more

Treo Gives Direction For Answering Queries Over Graph Data

treonewLater this year, expect to see an open source version of Treo, a semantic search and question answering system designed to help organizations deal particularly with the variety problem of Big Data. A Digital Enterprise Research Institute (DERI) thesis project that’s headed up by fifth-year PhD candidate and Amtera Semantic Technologies co-founder André Freitas, Treo (which means ‘direction’ in Gallic) aims to take on highly heterogeneous databases with thousands or even millions of attributes, via a natural language and intuitive interface to “talk” to that data.

“Treo,” says Freitas, “is kind of an elegant algorithm to use distributional semantics for answering queries over graph data.”

Read more

Taking Semantic Tech To The Enterprise Mobile E-Learning Crowd

Recently launched in the Apple store for iPad tablets is a free version of Epsilon, a semantically-enriched mobile e-learning app from SemantiStar, the company that was previously involved in the development of the iPad news reader app StreamGlider. (See our coverage of that product here). Epsilon, as SemantiStar CEO Bill McDaniel puts it, provides an example of the company’s primary goal, which is to put semantic technology into traditional enterprise applications.

Building on research SemantiStar was involved in with DERI a few years back about what semantic pieces of technology would make e-learning better, the Epsilon mobile app is positioning itself to be the delivery vehicle for enterprises’ courseware, regardless of what their learning management system or repository may be. It has core support for Moodle format courses, but Epsilon can be attached to any LMS as long as there is an open API. The free, downloadable version is the entryway to the subscription-based enterprise version available directly from the company.

Read more

A Semantic Lift For Social Journalism

Photo Courtesy: Flickr/ NS Newsflash

Everyone’s heard about the concept of citizen journalism. But what about social semantic journalism?

As The Semantic Web Blog initially reported here, a NUI Galway project focusing on social semantic journalism recently received funding from Science Foundation Ireland, and Dr. Bahareh R. Heravi, Postdoctoral Researcher and Work Group Lead, Digital Humanities and Journalism, at NUI’s Digital Enterprise Research Institute (DERI) is starting the initial phase of the effort with a feasibility study.

“The project idea comes from the fact that in recent years a lot of news has been generated on social media,” says Heravi. Journalists have leveraged this user-generated content (UGC) to find stories and support their work. It’s been especially helpful to them when it’s too dangerous or expensive for a news organization to send reporters to a region, or when it’s impossible to gain access to an area due to conflicts there, or when a natural disaster occurs in a place where the media company generally lacks a presence. Read more

Fujitsu Looks to Ireland for the Future of Linked Data, Semantic Web

Carmel Doyle of Silicon Republic reports, “Fujitsu Laboratories is set to engage in a series of collaborative Irish research projects over the next three years to test technologies in order to steer the ICT company’s future strategy. Fujitsu Ireland CEO Regina Moran said collaborative R&D has the scope to deliver a seven-fold return on an initial investment. Moran was speaking at an innovation conference organised by Fujitsu that kicked off in Croke Park in Dublin this morning. Industry strategists and academics are convening at the one-day event to thrash out ideas on ways of maximising R&D collaboration in order to translate research activity into commercial outputs.” Read more

Getting Europe Into The App Economy

In the United States, the app economy, as of late 2012, had created close to 530,000 jobs and served as a significant economic driver for a number of states. A study released by CTIA-The Wireless Association and the Application Developers Alliance, dubbed The Geography of the App Economy, reported more than 2.4 million apps available on more than 11 different operating systems and the stat that by 2016, mobile app revenue would be more than $46 billion.

Europe wants in. No wonder, when you see stats like the one from ABI Research this year that point to the combined app revenue from tablets and smartphones being projected to reach $92 billion by 2018, and to the app economy growing at 44.6 percent on average annually. But the continent needs some data to help it get its spot in the limelight, which is where Eurapp comes in.

The newly launched venture, Eurapp, was birthed by the European Commission, and is being run by the Digital Enterprise Research Institute at NUI Galway in conjunction with tech industry analyst firm GigaOM Research. It’s part of the Startup Europe initiative of the European Commission’s Digital Agenda, which aims to help tech entrepreneurs start, maintain and grow their businesses in Europe.  NUI Galway’s Dr John Breslin, SIOC creator and co-founder of iPad news and social reader app StreamGlider (see our story here) is leading the Eurapp project at DERI.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>