Posts Tagged ‘Elisa Kendall’

Hello 2014 (Part 2)

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Courtesy: Flickr/faul

Picking up from where we left off yesterday, we continue exploring where 2014 may take us in the world of semantics, Linked and Smart Data, content analytics, and so much more.

Marco Neumann, CEO and co-founder, KONA and director, Lotico: On the technology side I am personally looking forward to make use of the new RDF1.1 implementations and the new SPARQL end-point deployment solutions in 2014 The Semantic Web idea is here to stay, though you might call it by a different name (again) in 2014.

Bill Roberts, CEO, Swirrl:   Looking forward to 2014, I see a growing use of Linked Data in open data ‘production’ systems, as opposed to proofs of concept, pilots and test systems.  I expect good progress on taking Linked Data out of the hands of specialists to be used by a broader group of data users.

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Hello 2014

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Courtesy: Flickr/Wonderlane

Yesterday we said a fond farewell to 2013. Today, we look ahead to the New Year, with the help, once again, of our panel of experts:

Phil Archer, Data Activity Lead, W3C:

For me the new Working Groups (WG) are the focus. I think the CSV on the Web WG is going to be an important step in making more data interoperable with Sem Web.

I’d also like to draw attention to the upcoming Linking Geospatial Data workshop in London in March. There have been lots of attempts to use Geospatial data with Linked Data, notably GeoSPARQL of course. But it’s not always easy. We need to make it easier to publish and use data that includes geocoding in some fashion along with the power and functionality of Geospatial Information systems. The workshop brings together W3C, OGC, the UK government [Linked Data Working Group], Ordnance Survey and the geospatial department at Google. It’s going to be big!

[And about] JSON-LD: It’s JSON so Web developers love it, and it’s RDF. I am hopeful that more and more JSON will actually be JSON-LD. Then everyone should be happy.

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Following Up on FIBO At SemTechBiz

SemTechBizThe Financial Industry Business Ontology (FIBO) was a main topic of interest at last week’s Semantic Technology & Business Conference – which took place in New York City, the capital of the financial services industry. FIBO, as The Semantic Web Blog has previously discussed, is both a business conceptual ontology and an operational ontology delivered together, designed to be useful both to the financial industry and the regulatory community in understanding the complex patterns and relationships of information characteristic of the sector, with the goal of driving greater transparency. The FIBO initiative is a joint effort underway by the Object Management Group and the Enterprise Data Management (EDM) Council.  But many other different standards will be useful to solve the industry’s issues, as well.

At the presentation, Semantics in Finance, Thematix Partners’ principal Elisa Kendall – self-described standards wonk and member of the OMG Architecture Board and co-chair, Ontology Definition Metamodel (ODM) Revision Task Force – pointed out that the amount of regulation in the financial services sector has increased over 400 percent in the last two to three years. She argued for a little more sympathy for the financial services industry, too, which hasn’t been on the receiving end of a lot of that since about 2008 – even though some of these players stepped up to buy companies that were knocked flat by the mortgage market meltdown.

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New Session Added to SemTechBiz NYC Line-up: Semantics in Finance

A new presentation has been added to the already bustling agenda for the Semantic Technology and Business Conference in New York next month. The conference, which takes place October 2-3 at the New Yorker, will now include Semantics in Finance: Addressing Looming Train Wreck in Risk Management, Regulatory Compliance and Reporting,  a presentation by Elisa Kendall, a partner at Thematix Partners. Read more

FIBO, FIBO, It’s Off To A Financial Industry Business Ontology We Go

 

Photo Courtesy: Flickr, epicharmus

Credit default swaps. Collateralized debt obligations. Moral hazards. The average person might find the financial services sector and its language as mystifying as some of those involved in the industry might find semantic technology. An event hosted by OMG and the EDM Council in New York City yesterday was aimed at demystifying the latter for Wall Street. But putting the technology to work there might help clarify the discourse around financial instruments for a wider audience, including the regulators who want to deal with concentration of risk issues that played a big role in the Wall Street meltdown.

One part of the picture is FIBO, the Financial Industry Business Ontology, which was the subject of two sessions at the event. An advance discussion of the topic with Thematix principals Elisa Kendall and Jim Rhyne, who was a panelist at the event, set the stage for us here at The Semantic Web Blog. “The primary practical use for an ontology like FIBO that is descriptive of various kinds of financial instruments, including so-called exotics, is that regulators and financial market participants get a common language to talk about things,” Rhyne explains. This is important, given that financial regulators try hard to be collaborative with the industry, pointing out the need, he says, for careful management of financial instruments, including recommendations about capital buffers to deal with downside risk and asking for timely reports of information that would allow them to assess the possibility that a systemic problem could occur rather than directly intervening by stopping trades.

Especially in the derivatives marketplace, there is a lot of “funky terminology,” he says, and not all of it is as well-understood as it should be. Different parties and different parts of the marketplace may call the same instrument by different terms, and one of FIBO’s aims is to provide a common vocabulary.

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Highlights from SemTechBiz DC

David Read recently shared his reflections on the Semantic Technology and Business Conference in Washington DC earlier this month (the next SemTechBiz conference will be held in Berlin in February). Read writes, “To begin the conference I attended the half day “Ontology 101” presented by Elisa Kendall and Deborah McGuinness. They indicated that this presentation has been given at each semantic technology conference and the interest is still strong.  The implication being that new people continue to want to understand this art. Their material was very useful and if you are someone looking to get a grounding in ontologies (What are they?  How do you go about creating them?) I recommend attending this session the next time it is offered.  Both leaders clearly have deep experience and expertise in this field.  Also, the discussion was not tied to a technology (e.g. RDF) so it was applicable regardless of underlying implementation details.” Read more

Learn Ontology Development at SemTechBiz DC

In less than one week SemTechBiz DC will arrive at the Kellogg Conference Hotel in Washington, DC. The conference, which takes place November 29-December 1, 2011, will feature highly-anticipated sessions led by top thinkers in the fields of Open Government, Content Management, Enterprise Data Management, Linked Data, and much more.

Featured Presentation

Photo of Presenters Elisa Kendall and Deborah L. McGuinness

Elisa Kendall and Deborah L. McGuinness

Ontology 101: An Introduction to Knowledge Representation and Ontology Development with Elisa Kendall, Partner – Thematix LLC and Deborah McGuinness, Tetherless World Chaired Constellation Professor – Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

This presentation will provide an introductory-level technical examination of ontologies. Read more

Ontologies Here, There, and Everywhere

What do the Open Travel Association, the Filoli historic site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and the Ontology Platform Special Interest Group (PSIG) at the Object Management Group all have in common? Ontologies, of course!

Starting at the most obvious point, the Ontology PSIG developed the Ontology Definition Metamodel (ODM), and at the upcoming SemTech conference, Elisa Kendall, CEO of Sandpiper Software, co -editor of ODM and co-chair of the Ontology PSIG, will discuss some of the latest work underway there. Of which, she tells The Semantic Web Blog, there is “a ton.”

Among the efforts underway are making ODM current with W3C specs including support for OWL 2 (which should be available towards year’s end), and others that depend to some degree on the standard and building on that baseline.

These include vertical industry efforts such as Common Terminology Services (CTS) 2 from the health care sector’s HL7 standardization body. Kendall says this builds on the first version of ODM, with the focus on using ontologies and depending on semantics for providing the terminology, translation and cross-correlation of the maze of hospital and insurance codes to enable interchange of this data among parties.

The CTS2 effort has been generalized so that it can support terminology services for other verticals as well, which the OMG Ontology PSIG group hopes will make it more broadly useful. “We’ll have to see how that plays out in practice, since it’s only just being published this summer,” Kendall says.

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