Posts Tagged ‘entity search’

Elliot Turner of AlchemyAPI on Natural Language Processing

Alchemy API

Seth Grimes posted to Smart Data Collective a conversation he had with Elliot Turner of AlchemyAPI. He asked Turner, “How well are we doing with Natural Language Processing, noting that formally, ‘processing’ includes both understanding and generation, two parts of a conversation?” Turner responded, “Google has trained us to search using keywords, and this won’t change overnight. But the trend is easy to spot: the interactive question-answering capabilities made famous by IBM’s Watson will become commonplace, offered at a fraction of today’s costs and made available as easy-to-integrate web services.” Read more

Semantic Search and the Data Center

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Haim Koshchitzky of Sys-Con Media recently wrote, “Enterprise applications can ‘live’ in many places and their logs might be scattered and unstandardized. First generation log analysis tools made some of the log data searchable, but the onus was on the developer to know what to look for. That process could take many hours, potentially leading to unacceptable downtime for critical applications. Proprietary log formats also confuse and confound conventional keyword search. That’s why semantic search can be so helpful. It uses machine intelligence to understand the context of words, so it becomes possible for a Google user to type ‘cheap flights to Tel Aviv on February 10th’ rather than just ‘cheap flights’ and receive a listing of actual flights rather than links to airline discounters. Bing Facebook, Google and some vertical search engines include semantic technology to better understand natural language. It saves time and creates a better experience.” Read more

Schema.org, Semantic Search, and Your Web Page

Google Hummingbird

Barbara Starr of Search Engine Land recently wrote, “Although there has been some argument within the academic community that the Semantic Web ‘never happened,’ it is blatantly clear that Google has adopted its own version of it. Other search and social engines have as well — I wrote an article back in September 2012 discussing how search and social engines are adopting the Semantic Web and semantic search, and gave a timeline of the adoption of semantic search by both the search and social engines. It was very apparent, even then, that the search engines were moving in the direction of becoming answer engines, and that they were increasingly leveraging the Semantic Web and semantic search technology.” Read more

Adchemy and the Next Wave of Search

adchemy

Jim Edwards recently wrote an article in Seattle PI stating, “Adchemy, the Foster City, Calif., adtech startup, sold its lead generation business to XL Marketing earlier this month. So we thought it was a good time to check in with Murthy Nukala, the company’s founder and CEO, to see where Adchemy is going now. Business Insider named Adchemy one of our hottest adtech startups recently in part because the company has taken a huge amount of venture capital funding — $119 million over eight years. Its backers include Accenture and Microsoft. (For contrast, Rocket Fuel, which staged an IPO this year, had taken only $77 million before it went public.) Nukala is also a prominent brain in the adtech world: He attended both MIT and Harvard Business School.” Read more

Entity Search: The Future of Search

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Paul Bruemmer of Search Engine Land recently wrote, “On September 26, Google took another step toward becoming that answer engine with its Hummingbird update. In Danny Sullivan‘s live blog about the Hummingbird algorithm, he explains how Google is rapidly adopting semantic Web technology while still retaining parts of its old algorithmThis is Google’s solution for evolving from text links to answers. Such a system will display more precise results faster, as it’s based on semantic technology focused on user intent rather than on search terms. To review Google’s progress in this direction: first came the Knowledge Graph, then Voice Search and Google Now — all providing answers, and sometimes even anticipating the questions. To serve these answers, Google relies on entities rather than keywords.” Read more