Posts Tagged ‘ESB’

Keep On Keeping On

“There is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage than the creation of a new order of things…. Whenever his enemies have the ability to attack the innovator, they do so with the passion of partisans, while the others defend him sluggishly, so that the innovator and his party alike are vulnerable.”
–Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince (1513)

Atlanta's flying car laneIn case you missed it, a series of recent articles have made a Big Announcement:

The Semantic Web is not here yet.

Additionally, neither are flying cars, the cure for cancer, humans traveling to Mars or a bunch of other futuristic ideas that still have merit.

A problem with many of these articles is that they conflate the Vision of the Semantic Web with the practical technologies associated with the standards. While the Whole Enchilada has yet to emerge (and may never do so), the individual technologies are finding their way into ever more systems in a wide variety of industries. These are not all necessarily on the public Web, they are simply Webs of Data. There are plenty of examples of this happening and I won’t reiterate them here.

Instead, I want to highlight some other things that are going on in this discussion that are largely left out of these narrowly-focused, provocative articles.

First, the Semantic Web has a name attached to its vision and it has for quite some time. As such, it is easy to remember and it is easy to remember that it Hasn’t Gotten Here Yet. Every year or so, we have another round of articles that are more about cursing the darkness than lighting candles.

In that same timeframe, however, we’ve seen the ascent and burn out failure of Service-Oriented Architectures (SOA), Enterprise Service Buses (ESBs), various MVC frameworks, server side architectures, etc. Everyone likes to announce $20 million sales of an ESB to clients. No one generally reports on the $100 million write-downs on failed initiatives when they surface in annual reports a few years later. So we are left with a skewed perspective on the efficacy of these big “conventional” initiatives.

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Ask the Author – IT of the Future: Semantic Cloud Architecture

Image of the paper cover - I.T. of the Future: Semantic Cloud ArchitectureRecently, we published Yefim “Jeff” Zhuk’s article, “IT of the Future: Semantic Cloud Architecture.” The paper has been a very popular free download (available here).

One of the readers, Lev Gorodinski (CTO, EPaySpot), approached Jeff directly with some questions and the two engaged in a conversation filled with insights that they wanted to share with our readers. They are kindly allowing us to republish the thread in its entirety.

Photo of Lev GorodinskiLev Gorodinski: I’ve read the article and have some bigger picture questions and comments which likely warrant several discussions. Overall, I am interested in methodologies which aim to bridge the gap between knowledge and its technical manifestation and am therefore interested in the subject matter.

The term “sandbox” in BASE may create the impression that it isn’t a production level system. I think that both the goal of BASE to “Decrease the number of manual operations required for business changes” and its notion of a “playground” are essential to making it ready for production. This will allow an agile and iterative development and exploration process.

Photo of Jeff ZhukJeff Zhuk: The primary purpose is setting a common ground where business analysts and developers can collaborate on real business tasks. For some companies this ground can serve in production and other companies might feel more comfortable to use it as a playground for safe development and testing before copying to production. The role of the playground will be growing without growing maintenance cost.
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Orchestration on the Edge

When people think about orchestration efforts, they tend to think about centralized, Enterprise Service Bus (ESB)-based efforts. The service elements are published into reusable components that can be stitched together into workflows. This vision of Service-Oriented Architectures (SOA) allows central metrics of use and stability, but it precludes a common use case familiar to Unix users.

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