Posts Tagged ‘future’

What Will The Internet of Things Look Like in 2020?

5436515880_784b02af11_bDr. Mahesh Saptharishi of Forbes recently wrote, “Communication, in its many forms, has tremendous power… When you combine language with the Internet, you see how our lives have changed; we are freed from past limitations of distance, time and memory. Sensors give us an even greater opportunity to experience our world. The Internet-of-Things (IoT), as these connected sensors are collectively called, has enabled the digitization of language communicated by the physical world. Sensors allow the Internet to instantly extend the reach of our sight and sound. The data from sensors allow us to not only interactively, but also observationally communicate language.” Read more

Jeff Hawkins on the Future of Artificial Intelligence

3214197147_a36c631f71Derrick Harris of GigaOM recently wrote, “Jeff Hawkins is best known for bringing us the Palm Pilot, but he’s working on something that could be much, much bigger. For the past several years, Hawkins has been studying how the human brain functions with the hope of replicating it in software. In 2004, he published a book about his findings. In 2012, Numenta, the company he founded to commercialize his work, finally showed itself to the world after roughly seven years operating in stealth mode. I recently spoke with Hawkins to get his take on why his approach to artificial intelligence will ultimately overtake other approaches, including the white-hot field of deep learning. We also discussed how Numenta has survived some early business hiccups and how he plans to keep the lights on and the money flowing in.” Read more

How Semantic Search Predicts the Future

11066925735_dbe0318b25Daniel Newman of Forbes recently wrote his third and final article in a series on the future of marketing and how that future is interwoven with semantic search. Newman writes, “The internet is getting smarter and this growing intelligence and insights is populating a new kind of semantic web that is providing more than just the most relevant results for people searching, but also some key data to marketers that may just tell us about intent. For movie fans out there, you may remember the movie Minority Report. In this Tom Cruise feature film the star would go out and stop crimes before they would happen as intelligence reached a point where it could see a crime that was about to be committed. At the time the concept seemed pretty far fetched, but really this type of intelligence is very similar to how the semantic web may be able to tell you who may be your next big customer.” Read more

Artificial Intelligence: What We Hoped For & What We’ve Gotten

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Michael C. Daconta of GCN recently wrote, “Over the last year, several developments on the artificial intelligence (AI) front have occurred that reflect our wildest fantasies and worst fears for this technology.  Here are a few examples: A battle continues to rage between MIT linguist Noam Chomsky and Google Director of Research Peter Norvig over the increased use of statistics and probability in AI.  Chomsky argued that the ‘new AI’ is merely mimicking behavior instead of unraveling the rules and processes of cognition.  On the other hand, Norvig takes a more practical, probabilistic approach, believing in AI’s suitability for natural language processing, for instance. Last month, CNBC reported that inventor Elon Musk and physicist Stephen Hawking expressed concerns about the future of AI, suggesting that there are dangers in the fledging AI market.  They made it easy to surmise they fear a Robopocalypse caused by AI run amok!” Read more

Data.gov Turns Five

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Nextgov reports, “When government technology leaders first described a public repository for government data sets more than five years ago, the vision wasn’t totally clear. ‘I just didn’t understand what they were talking about,’ said Marion Royal of the General Services Administration, describing his first introduction to the project. ‘I was thinking, ‘this is not going to work for a number of reasons.’’ A few minutes later, he was the project’s program director. He caught onto and helped clarify that vision and since then has worked with a small team to help shepherd online and aggregate more than 100,000 data sets compiled and hosted by agencies across federal, state and local governments.” Read more

Internet Hall of Fame Inductees on the Future of the Web

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Leonard Kleinrock of Wired reports, “[On Friday] in Hong Kong 24 new inductees were welcomed into the Internet Hall of Fame, which was launched by the Internet Society in 2012 to recognize individuals who have pushed the boundaries of technological and social innovation through the design and advancement of the global Internet. Because I was a member of the original inductee class, the Hall of Fame asked me to interview some of this year’s inductees about their visions for the future of the Internet, and what obstacles might stand in the way of these ideals. Hailing from Africa, Europe, Asia and Latin America, these inductees provided interesting insights into how the Internet is likely to evolve over the next decade in their corners of the globe, and what we as a global society need to do to prepare for the coming challenges of this evolution.” Read more

Semantic Tech’s Role in Travel in 2024

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Amy Plitt of the Daily Traveler reports, “Travel-booking website Skyscanner partnered with 56 experts, including researchers from Google and Microsoft, as well as UK consulting firm The Future Laboratory, to determine what the future of travel might look like. The company released its findings this week, and unsurprisingly, emerging technology will make traveling both easier and more intuitive. The first part of the report focuses on planning and booking trips. According to the experts surveyed, one of the biggest changes will be the development of ‘Digital Travel Buddies,’ virtual companions that will guide you through every step of the process and help you once you’re on your trip. (Think Apple’s Siri, but way better at knowing what you want before you want it.) Read more

Nuance on the Future of Natural Language Processing

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Gopal Sathe of NDTV Gadgets recently wrote, “We caught up with Sunny Rao, the MD of Nuance Communications India and South East Asia, and chatted about the developments in speech recognition, frustrations with using speech-to-text software and how the way we interact with our devices is about to change forever. Rao speaks like a person who has been talking to machines for a long time – his speech is clear, and there’s a small space around each word for maximum clarity. Over tea, we’re able to discuss how voice recognition is being used around the world, and how he sees the future of the technology shaping up. And naturally, we talked about the movie Her.” Read more

Google, Facebook, and the Cold War

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Ron Callari of Inventor Spot recently wrote, “It’s hard to say, looking twenty to thirty years into the future, just how different the digital landscape will look. Semantic Technology, Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and Web 3.0 are presently only toddling along in their infant stage. What they will look like in the next few decades is only guesswork on our part.  However if we were pressed to gamble on the outcome, a smart man’s wager might be that the last two digital super powers left standing will be Google and Facebook [with the possible exception of China]. A CNN Money report describes this evolution as analogous to the ‘Cold War,’ to conjure up imagery of what transpired between America and the Soviet Union, post World War II.” Read more

Will a Robot Be Doing Your Job in 20 Years?

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The Times of India recently wrote, “Who needs an army of lawyers when you have a computer? When Minneapolis attorney William Greene faced the task of combing through 1.3 million electronic documents in a recent case, he turned to a so-called smart computer programme. Three associates selected relevant documents from a smaller sample, ‘teaching’ their reasoning to the computer. The software’s algorithms then sorted the remaining material by importance. ‘We were able to get the information we needed after reviewing only 2.3% of the documents,’ said Greene, a Minneapolis-based partner at law firm Stinson Leonard Street LLP. Artificial intelligence has arrived in the American workplace, spawning tools that replicate human judgments that were too complicated and subtle to distill into instructions for a computer. Algorithms that ‘learn’ from past examples relieve engineers of the need to write out every command.” Read more

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