Posts Tagged ‘getty’

First of Four Getty Vocabularies Made Available as Linked Open Data

Getty Vocabularies - Linked Open Data logoJim Cuno, the President and CEO of the Getty, announced yesterday that the Getty Research Institute has released the Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) ® as Linked Open Data. Cuno said, “The Art & Architecture Thesaurus is a reference of over 250,000 terms on art and architectural history, styles, and techniques. It’s one of the Getty Research Institute’s four Getty Vocabularies, a collection of databases that serves as the premier resource for cultural heritage terms, artists’ names, and geographical information, reflecting over 30 years of collaborative scholarship.”

The data set is available for download at vocab.getty.edu under an Open Data Commons Attribution License (ODC BY 1.0). Vocab.getty.edu offers a SPARQL endpoint, as well as links to the Getty’s Semantic Representation documentation, the Getty Ontology, links for downloading the full data sets, and more.

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The Problem With Names

New Amsterdam... or not?

Earlier this week I spent an enjoyable hour on the phone, discussing the work done by a venerable world-class museum in making data about its collections available to a new audience of developers and app-builders. Much of our conversation revolved around consideration of obstacles and barriers, and the most intractable of those proved something of a surprise.

Reluctance amongst senior managers to let potentially valuable data walk out the door? Nope. In fact, not even close; managers pushed museum staff to adopt a more permissive license for metadata (CC0) than the one (CC-BY) they had been considering.

Reluctance amongst curators to let their carefully crafted metadata be abused and modified by non-professionals? Possibly a little bit, but apparently nothing the team couldn’t handle.

A bean-counter’s obsession with measuring every click, every query, every download, such that the whole project became bogged down in working out what to count and when (and, sadly, that really is the case elsewhere!)? Again, no. “The intention was to create a possibility” by releasing data. The museum didn’t know what adoption would be like, and sees experimentation and risk-taking as part of its role. Monitoring is light, and there’s no intention to change that.

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