Posts Tagged ‘Google’

Schema.Org: The Fire’s Been Lit

schemaorgadoptspecificWhy has schema.org made the following strides since its debut in 2011?

  • In a sample of over 12 billion web pages, 21 percent, or 2.5 billion pages, use it to mark up HTML pages, to the tune of more than 15 billion entities and more than 65 billion triples;
  • In that same sample, this works out to six entities and 26 facts per page with schema.org;
  • Just about every major site in every major category, from news to e-commerce (with the exception of Amazon.com), uses it;
  • Its ontology counts some 800 properties and 600 classes.

A lot of it has to do with the focus its proponents have had since the beginning on making it very easy for webmasters and developers to adopt and leverage the collection of shared vocabularies for page markup. At this August’s 10th annual Semantic Technology & Business conference in San Jose, Google Fellow Ramanathan V. Guha, one of the founders of schema.org, shared the progress of the initiative to develop one vocabulary that would be understood by all search engines and how it got to where it is today.

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Baidu Takes on Artificial Intelligence

Baidu logoDaniel Sparks of The Motley Fool reported, “”Chinese companies are starting to dream,” said early investor in Baidu (NASDAQ: BIDU  ) and managing partner at GGV Capital Jixun Foo. Foo’s proclamation was made in an in-depth article by MIT Technology Review, which examined the Chinese search giant’s new effort to change the world with artificial intelligence. The company’s new AI lab does, indeed, accompany some lofty aspirations — ones big enough to hopefully help Baidu become a global Internet powerhouse and to compete with the likes of Google in increasingly important emerging markets where the default search engine hasn’t yet taken the throne. But what are the implications for investors? Fortunately, Baidu’s growing infatuation with AI looks like it could give birth to winning strategies that could build sustainable value over the long haul.”

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Deconstructing Google’s Knowledge Graph

Image from Google I/O showing the addition of information into Google's Knowledge Graph using JSON-LD.Barbara Starr of Search Engine Land recently observed that, “Search is changing – and it’s changing faster than ever. Increasingly, we are seeing organic elements in search results being displaced by displays coming from the Knowledge Graph. Yet the shift from search over documents (e.g. web pages) to search over data (e.g. Knowledge Graph) is still in its infancy. Remember Google’s mission statement: Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information to make it universally accessible and useful. The Knowledge Graph was built to help with that mission. It contains information about entities and their relationships to one another – meaning that Google is increasingly able to recognize a search query as a distinct entity rather than just a string of keywords. As we shift further away from keyword-based search and more towards entity-based search, internal data quality is becoming more imperative.”

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Google, Jetpac, and Deep Learning

jetpacChristian de Looper of TechTimes recently wrote, “Google is buying Jetpac Inc., an business that makes city guides using publicly available Instragram photos. Using that data, Jetpac determines things like the happiest city… Jetpac essentially algorithmically scans users Instagram photos to generate lists like ‘10 Scenic Hikes’ which can be very handy for those travelling in a city they’ve never been to before. Jetpac has created a total of around 6,000 city guides. Not only that, but the app also puts users’ knowledge of cities to the test in a number of quizzes” Read more

A Venture Capitalist’s Take on the Internet of Things

photo of Nest ProtectDavid Hirsch, co-founder of Metamorphic Ventures, recently wrote for Tech Crunch, “There has been a lot of talk in the venture capital industry about automating the home and leveraging Internet-enabled devices for various functions. The first wave of this was the use of the smartphone as a remote control to manage, for instance, a thermostat. The thermostat then begins to recognize user habits and adapt to them, helping consumers save money. A lot of people took notice of this first-generation automation capability when Google bought Nest for a whopping $3.2 billion. But this purchase was never about Nest; rather, it was Google’s foray into the next phase of the Internet of Things.” Read more

Google Releases Linguistic Data based on NY Times Annotated Corpus

Photo of New York Times Building in New York City

Dan Gillick and Dave Orr recently wrote, “Language understanding systems are largely trained on freely available data, such as the Penn Treebank, perhaps the most widely used linguistic resource ever created. We have previously released lots of linguistic data ourselves, to contribute to the language understanding community as well as encourage further research into these areas. Now, we’re releasing a new dataset, based on another great resource: the New York Times Annotated Corpus, a set of 1.8 million articles spanning 20 years. 600,000 articles in the NYTimes Corpus have hand-written summaries, and more than 1.5 million of them are tagged with people, places, and organizations mentioned in the article. The Times encourages use of the metadata for all kinds of things, and has set up a forum to discuss related research.”

The blog continues with, “We recently used this corpus to study a topic called “entity salience”. To understand salience, consider: how do you know what a news article or a web page is about? Reading comes pretty easily to people — we can quickly identify the places or things or people most central to a piece of text. But how might we teach a machine to perform this same task? This problem is a key step towards being able to read and understand an article. One way to approach the problem is to look for words that appear more often than their ordinary rates.”

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Photo credit : Eric Franzon

The Four Top Search Providers Unite to Talk Semantic Web

schema dot org logoMark Albertson of the Examiner recently wrote, “It was an unusual sight to be sure. Standing on a convention center stage together were computer engineers from the four largest search providers in the world (Google, Yahoo, Microsoft Bing, and Yandex). Normally, this group couldn’t even agree on where to go for dinner, but this week in San Jose, California they were united by a common cause: the Semantic Web… At the Semantic Technology and Business Conference is San Jose this week, researchers from around the world gathered to discuss how far they have come and the mountain of work still ahead of them.” Read more

Blab Builds The Conversation Graph

blab2We have the Knowledge Graph, the Enterprise Graph, the Researcher Graph, the Supply Chain Graph – and now, the Conversation Graph, too

That’s how Blab characterizes the work it’s doing to add structure to the chaotic world of online conversation, normalizing and patterning the world’s discussions across 50,000 social network, news outlet, blog, video and other channels, regardless of language – to the tune of some hundred million posts per day and 1 million predictions per minute. Near realtime predictions, says CEO Randy Browning, of what a target audience will be interested in a 72-hour forward-looking window based on what they’re talking about now, so that customers can tailor their buying strategies for AdWords or search terms as well as create or deploy content that’s relevant to those interests.

“We predict what will be important to people so they can buy search terms or AdWords at a great price before the market or Google sees it,” he says. That’s the main reason customers turn to Blab today, with optimizing their own content taking second place. Crisis management is the third deployment rationale. “If a brand has multiple issues, we can tell them which will be significant or which will be a blip and then fade away, so they can get a predictive understanding of where to focus their resources to mitigate issues coming down the pike.

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New Opps For Libraries And Vendors Open Up In BIBFRAME Transition

semtechbiz-10th-125sqOpportunities are opening up in the library sector, both for the institutions themselves and providers whose solutions and services can expand in that direction.

These vistas will be explored in a session hosted by Kevin Ford, digital project coordinator at the Library of Congress at next week’s Semantic Technology & Business conference in San Jose. The door is being opened by the Bibliographic Framework Initiative (BIBFRAME) that the LOC launched a few years ago. Libraries will be moving from the MARC standards, their lingua franca for representing and communicating bibliographic and related information in machine-readable form, to BIBFRAME, which models bibliographic data in RDF using semantic technologies.

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Google Acquires Emu, a Messaging & Personal Assistant App

emuMark Langshaw of Digital Spy reports, “Google has acquired the company behind Emu, a messaging app that doubles as a personal assistant. The existing application, which was for iPhone only, will be pulled from the App Store later this month.’As of August 25, 2014, we’ll be shutting down the Emu app. It will no longer be available in the App Store, and existing users won’t be able to send, receive, or download messages. We know it’s an inconvenience, and we regret that,’ said the firm in a statement. Emu uses intelligent learning and natural language processing to present the user with relevant information in real-time, and can be integrated with other services.” Read more

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