Posts Tagged ‘healthcare’

Smart Glasses Don’t Have Consumer Vote Yet

gglassGot your Smart Glasses on today? If not, you’re very much not alone. According to a report published this month by Juniper Research, Smart Glasses: Consumer, Enterprise and Healthcare Strategies and Forecasts 2014-2019, smart glass shipments are “unlikely to exceed 10 million per annum until 2018.”

What’s holding back one of the early entrants in the wearables sector? The report cites “emerging privacy concerns, dismissal of the initial devices as ugly and, most importantly, questions about exactly how useful the devices are in day-to-day life. While there is an active development community for smart glasses, no developers have precise answers as to how the devices will improve the lives of consumers.”

There is enterprise interest, it notes, but because businesses are more likely to share devices among users rather than buy them in bulk for everyone, “this will result in high investment but low shipment volumes to the enterprise for the next five years.”

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Bring On The Apps For New Cognitive Computing Cloud Platform

CogScalelogoOctober saw the debut of Cognitive Scale’s cognitive cloud platform, which provides sourcing, analyzing and interpreting data of all sorts and context signals on any public cloud infrastructure. The details of the platform for pulling insights out of massive amounts of multi-structured data are covered in a story you can read at our sister site Dataversity.net. Here, The Semantic Web Blog relays some more information about usage scenarios around its services, according to Matt Sanchez, the company’s founder, chief technology officer, and vice president of products.

The platform includes at its top layer vertical applications, and healthcare is a main focus. Guided care applications have a spot here. The role of care managers becomes more important in the changing world of healthcare costs and reimbursements, where patient engagement – especially of the chronically ill – can keep a pediatric asthma patient, for example, from showing up in the ER room, which translates to a high-cost visit. Today, “provider organizations are more incented to be proactive in care,” says Sanchez, which means asking and analyzing who is at risk right now and what can be done to prevent a negative outcome like that.

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Two “Don’t Miss” Webinars this Week

Later this week, SemanticWeb.com will host two webinars, and (free) registration is open for both.

WEDNESDAY Webinar

Webinar: Monetizing Content with Semantic TechnologiesDATE: Wednesday, October 15, 2014
TIME: 2 PM Eastern / 11 AM Pacific
PRICE: Free to all attendees
MORE INFORMATION: http://semanticweb.com/webinar-monetizing-content-semantic-technologies_b44562click here to register now!

GeraldBurnand-150sqSPEAKER: Gerald Burnand is the chief technology officer at NTENT, a search technology company that leverages its proprietary services to deliver more valuable results for advertisers, publishers, and consumers across targeted vertical industries. Geraldhas over 25 years of experience in the domain of computer science, with an emphasis on semantic search technologies for the past 10 years. At NTENT, Gerald is able to exercise his passion for solving problems involving Big Data and semantics. Previously, Gerald delivered complete solutions for an auction house and a private bank in Switzerland. During the last 12 years with this company, Gerald worked on projects ranging from video analysis and video broadcasting platforms, to enterprise search and web scale search engine. Gerald holds a degree in Computer Science, Management and Finance from the University of Geneva in Switzerland.

FRIDAY Webinar

The Yosemite Project: An RDF Roadmap for Healthcare Information InteroperabilityDATE: Friday, October 17, 2014
TIME: 2 PM Eastern / 11 AM Pacific
PRICE: Free to all attendees
MORE INFORMATION: http://semanticweb.com/webinar-yosemite-project-rdf-roadmap-healthcare-information-interoperability_b44575

click here to register now!

Photo of David BoothSPEAKER: David Booth is a senior software architect at Hawaii Resource Group, LLC, using Semantic Web technology to make clinical healthcare data interoperable between diverse systems. He previously worked at KnowMED, using Semantic Web technology for healthcare quality-of-care and clinical outcomes measurement, and at PanGenX, applying Semantic Web technology to genomics in support of personalized medicine. Before that he worked on Cleveland Clinic’s SemanticDB project, which uses RDF and other semantic technologies to perform cardiovascular research. Prior to that was a software architect at HP Software, where his primary focus was emerging technologies. He was a W3C Fellow from 2002 to 2005, where he worked on Web Services standards before becoming involved in Semantic Web technology. He has been programming for many years using a variety of programming languages and operating systems. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from UCLA.

Semantically Aligned Design Principles At Core of Australian Electronic Health Records Platform

site-header-10th-blog-304x200At the upcoming Semantic Technology & Business Conference in San Jose, Dr. Terry Roach, principal of  CAPSICUM Business Architects, and Dr. Dean Allemang, principal consultant at Working Ontologist, will host a session on A Semantic Model for an Electronic Health Record (EHR). It will focus on Australia’s electronic-Health-As-A-Service  (eHaas) national platform for personal electronic health records, provided by the CAPSICUM semantic framework for strategically aligned business architectures.

Roach and Allemang participated in an email interview with The Semantic Web Blog to preview the topic:

The Semantic Web Blog: Can you put the work you are doing on the semantic EHR model in context: How does what Australia is doing with its semantic framework compare with how other countries are approaching EHRs and healthcare information exchange?

Roach and Allemang: The eHaaS project that we have been working on has been an initiative of Telstra, a large, traditional telecommunications provider in Australia. Its Telstra Health division, which is focused on health-related software investments, for the past two years has embarked on a set of strategic investments in the electronic health space. Since early 2013 it has acquired and/or established strategic partnerships with a number of local and international healthcare software providers ranging from hospital information systems [to] mobile health applications [to] remote patient monitoring systems to personal health records [to] integration platforms and health analytics suites.

At the core of these investments is a strategy to develop a platform that captures and maintains diverse health-related interactions in a consolidated lifetime health record for individuals. The eHaaS platform facilitates interoperability and integration of several health service components over a common secure authentication service, data model, infrastructure, and platform. Starting from a base of stand-alone, vertical applications that manage fragmented information across the health spectrum, the eHaaS platform will establish an integrated, continuously improving, shared healthcare data platform that will aggregate information from a number of vertical applications, as well as an external gateway for standards-based eHealth messages, to present a unified picture of an individual’s health care profile and history.

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Get The Scoop On The Critical ABCs of RDF

semtechbiz-10th-125sqThere’s a chance to learn everything you should know about RDF to get the most value from the W3C standard model for data interchange at the 10th annual Semantic Technology & Business Conference in San Jose next month. David Booth, senior software architect at Hawaii Resource Group, will be hosting a session explaining how the standard’s unique capabilities can have a profound effect on projects that seek to connect data coming in from multiple sources.

“One of the assumptions that people make looking at RDF is that it is  analogous to any other data format, like JSON or XML,” says Booth, who is working at the Hawaii Research Group’s on a contract the firm has with the U.S. Department of Defense to use semantic web technologies to achieve healthcare data interoperability. “It isn’t.” RDF, he explains, isn’t just another data format – rather, it’s about the information content that is encoded in the format.

“The focus is different. It is on the meaning of data vs. the details of syntax,” he says.

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IBM Watson Group CTO Discusses Cognitive Computing, Content Curation For Healthcare Market

robhighThe role that cognitive computing can play in healthcare was explored last week in this story published at The Semantic Web Blog’s sister site Dataversity.net. That article looked at how Modernizing Medicine is leveraging IBM Watson for its new schEMA tablet app that helps doctors use the wealth of published medical research from highly reputable sources, such as the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and New England Journal of Medicine, to answer their questions.

Today, we’re complementing that article to further explore such aspects of the health care and cognitive computing connection based on an email conversation with IBM Watson Group CTO Robert High. “IBM Watson is transforming the patient experience and healthcare delivery system by helping physicians make sense of the enormous amount of data generated by an increasingly connected healthcare environment,” High writes.

“Content curation is a critical part of the solution delivery process. Without reputable and reliable sources of medical literature, therapy choices offered by Watson may not have the supporting evidence needed to inform clinicians in the use of those treatments. We work with the top clinicians at our partners to collect their feedback on supporting evidence and cull inappropriate information from their sources.” IBM, along with its solutions partners, works with a variety of content providers based on the relevance of their materials to treatment options, he adds.

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Semantic Technology May Help NIH In Its HealthCare Advancement Mission

ashoknareOcto Consulting, a technology solutions and management services company for both the intelligence and healthcare sectors, recently published an infographic exploring the intersection among the Semantic Web, Linked Data and Health IT as it relates to accessing and interacting with data from an array of sources in the healthcare chain. “Our point of view is that in healthcare there are multiple data sources and so much data – especially when it comes to clinical trials, pharmaceuticals research and scientific data,” says CTO Ashok Nare. “It’s very possible that each of those data elements is represented in a different format, so how to take them all and connect them to ask questions you aren’t able to ask otherwise. That’s where semantic technologies are extremely useful.”

One health-care sector project in which Octo is putting semantic technologies to use these days is an effort it has underway with the U.S.’s medical research agency, the National Institutes of  Health, whose mission includes providing grants to the scientific community to engage in research and experiments “to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce illness and disability,”  as its web site explains. Now, not only does the NIH want to understand what it’s funding and how those grants are progressing, but also  “what opportunities it may be missing out on,” Nare explains.

That means continually assessing not only what’s in its portfolio but also what research gaps there are, which requires conducting analysis on more and more data sources and investigating more queries: That could mean more development and expense, without the help of semantic web technologies.

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Cognitum Points To Use Cases For Semantic Knowledge Engineering

fl24Cognitum’s year got off to a good start, with an investment from the Giza Polish Ventures Fund, and it plans to apply some of that funding to building its sales and development teams, demonstrating the approaches to and benefits of semantic knowledge engineering, and focusing on big implementations for recognizable customers. The company’s products include Fluent Editor 2 for editing and manipulating complex ontologies via controlled natural language (CNL) tools, and its NLP-fronted Ontorion Distributed Knowledge Management System for managing large ontologies in a distributed fashion (both systems are discussed in more detail in our story here). “The idea here is to open up semantic technologies more widely,” says CEO Pawel Zarzycki.

To whom? Zarzycki says the company currently has pilot projects underway in the banking sector, which see opportunities to leverage ontologies and semantic management frameworks that provide a more natural way for sharing and reusing knowledge and expressing business rules for purposes such as lead generation and market intelligence. In the telco sector, another pilot project is underway to support asset management and impact assessment efforts, and in the legal arena, the Poland-based company is working with the Polish branch of international legal company Eversheds on applying semantics to legal self-assessment issues. Having a semantic knowledge base can make it possible to automate the tasks behind assessing a legal issue, he says, and so it opens the door to outsourcing this job directly to the entity pursuing the case, with the lawyer stepping in mostly at the review stage. That saves a lot of time and money.

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Semantic Web Jobs: Siemens

Siemens

Siemens is looking for a Senior Staff Software Engineer in Malvern, PA. According to the post, “The Senior Staff Software Engineer will perform analysis, design, implementation, and testing of advanced clinical informatics software and knowledge systems. The position includes being part of a small team aimed at spearheading early clinical informatics development efforts by establishing early business requirements, service and knowledge oriented architectures and rapid development of prototypes with minimal supervision. (S)he will report to the Senior Manager, R&D who is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the innovations center. ” Read more

What’s Real In Personalized Mobile Healthcare

rsz_rxNews came this week that a man accused of defrauding a financial group out of close to a million dollars around an investment in a fictional mobile medical device tablet is scheduled to sign a plea agreement admitting that he committed mail fraud. The man, Howard Leventhal, had been promoting the Star Trek-influenced McCoy Home Health Care Tablet as a device that can instantaneously deliver detailed patient information to medical providers. (The product is discussed on the company’s still-surviving web site here.) He was arrested for the fraud in October and has been out on bail.

The interesting thing about this case is that the fake he was perpetrating isn’t very far removed from reality regarding the role mobile apps and systems will play in healthcare. There of course are plenty of mobile apps already available that help users do everything from monitoring their hearts to recording their blood-oxygen level during the night to see whether they have sleep apnea. Research and Markets, for example, says the wireless health market currently will grow to nearly $60 billion by 2018, up from $23.8 billion, with remote patient monitoring applications and diagnostics helping to drive the growth. But where things really get interesting is when mobile health takes on questions of semantic interoperability of accumulated data, and assessing its meaning.

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