Posts Tagged ‘HTML5’

HTML5: The Party Is Officially On!

w3chtmlWord came from the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) yesterday that it has published the 5th major revision of HTML, the core language of the web. While HTML5 is already in use by developers (having become a W3C candidate recommendation a couple of years ago), the recommendation for the standard is a lynchpin for the community, as it now formalizes stable guidelines for the development of innovative and cross-platform web sites and applications.

A key feature of HTML5 – the first major new HTML standard in more than a decade – is that it provides the ability to describe the structure of a web document with standard semantics. It uses semantic tags for things like page headers, footers, body, ordered lists, time, and more to better identify an element and how it is being used. Greater use of these tags should improve a browser’s ability to understand content for display across a range of devices and screen sizes without requiring any development rejiggering, and search engines’ ability to more effectively index a page, which could lead to better rankings.

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Start Your Semantic Engines: TrueCar Looks To Foster Transition Of Vehicle Data From Flat To Structured And Enhanced

Back when he was VP and CTO at Hearst Interactive Media, Mike Dunn advocated the use of semantic technologies for media organizations to rocket-boost their control over content, both for internal operations and for presenting a better face to users out there on the web. (See our story with his insights on that here). Now, Dunn has recently made the move to Truecar, an eight-year-young start-up focused on improving the car-buying process. As CTO, his mission is to modernize its data stack.

How do the two worlds of media and automotive connect? “There’s definitely a connection if you think about content as data,” Dunn told The Semantic Web Blog during a few free moments at the recent Semantic Technology and Business Conference. And, TrueCar gets “the importance of data, even though you don’t always have to throw the semantic web [phrase] in there. But things like sentiment-enhancing and context – those are useful words that don’t confuse people.”

Today, says Dunn, much of the data around vehicles, sales processes, and how cars are customized or configured tends to be fairly flat – that is, either unstructured and/or proprietary, but doors open up when it gains meaning — becomes structured, enhanced and openly known and leveraged from an industry perspective. “That transition, which we believe we’ll be able foster, will allow the creation of additional enhancing services to consumers and the industry at large,” he says.

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Steve Newcomb’s Famo.us Raises $4M in Funding

Anthony Ha of TechCrunch reports that the latest venture from Powerset founder Steve Newcomb has raised $4 million in Series A funding. Ha writes, “Famo.us, which offers a JavaScript framework that’s designed to power HTML5 apps that are faster and better-looking than what’s currently possible, has raised $4 million in Series A funding. The round was led by previous investor Javelin Venture Partners, with participation from ‘one or more’ hardware vendors (whose name or names aren’t being shared publicly). The company is led by Steve Newcomb, who previously co-founded Powerset, the semantic search startup acquired by Microsoft for $100 million. It actually launched at our Disrupt conference in San Francisco last fall. When I spoke to him about the funding, Newcomb admitted that his Disrupt presentation wasn’t exactly an overwhelming success, and that he faced some skepticism and confusing from the judges.” Read more

Tim Berners-Lee Discusses Dynamic Capabilities of HTML5, Open Web Access

In a recent interview with the BBC, Sir Tim Berners-Lee described what he believes will be the dynamic future of the web. The article states, “Sir Tim Berners Lee, the man credited with inventing the world wide web, has said that he sees the internet becoming more dynamic with web pages able to do “more amazing things” as technology advances. He spoke to the BBC’s Jon Sopel from Davos, Switzerland, where political and business leaders have gathered for the World Economic Forum.” Read more

HTML5 Definition Complete, W3C Moves to Interoperability Testing and Performance

First Draft of HTML 5.1 Offers Glimpse at Next Round of Standardization

HTML 5 logo(Press Release) 17 December 2012 — The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) published today the complete definition of the HTML5 and Canvas 2D specifications. Though not yet W3C standards, these specifications are now feature complete, meaning businesses and developers have a stable target for implementation and planning. HTML5 is the cornerstone of the Open Web Platform, a full programming environment for cross-platform applications with access to device capabilities; video and animations; graphics; style, typography, and other tools for digital publishing; extensive network capabilities; and more.

“The broader the reach of Web technology, the more our stakeholders demand a stable standard,” said W3C CEO Jeff Jaffe. “As of today, businesses know what they can rely on for HTML5 in the coming years, and what their customers will demand. Likewise, developers will know what skills to cultivate to reach smart phones, cars, televisions, ebooks, digital signs, and devices not yet known.”

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Manu Sporny on HTML5 and RDFa 1.1

HTML 5 logoManu Sporny has published an interesting article regarding HTML5 and RDFa 1.1. He writes, “The newly re-chartered RDFa Working Group at the W3C published a First Public Working Draft ofHTML5+RDFa 1.1 today. This might be confusing to those of you that have been following the RDFa specifications. Keep in mind that HTML5+RDFa 1.1 is different from XHTML+RDFa 1.1, RDFa Core 1.1, and RDFa Lite 1.1 (which are official specs at this point). This is specifically about HTML5 and RDFa 1.1. The HTML5+RDFa 1.1 spec reached Last Call (aka: almost done) status at W3C via the HTML Working Group last year. So, why are we doing this now and what does it mean for the future of RDFa in HTML5?” Read more

The Current State & Future of HTML5

Jeff Jaffe of the W3C reports, “HTML5 is the cornerstone of the Open Web Platform that the web community is building. This week saw two significant events in W3C that bolster our efforts… First, we announced that Adobe, Google, and Microsoft have provided significant funds to sponsor more complete W3C staff coverage to achieve Recommendation Status for HTML5 for 2014.”

He continues, “Second, the chairs announced people from the community chosen to participate in the editorial team to complete HTML5: Travis Leithead, Erika Doyle Navara, Ted O’Connor, and Silvia Pfeiffer; more names will follow. With these contributions of time and money from our Membership, we are confident that HTML5 is resourced to move forward. And we are pleased that the Working Group, in collaboration with others in the community, is also focused on what will come next – as web technology continues to be a living technology.” Read more

Expert Schema.org Panel Finalized for #SemTechBiz San Francisco Program

Q: What do Google, Microsoft, Yahoo!, Yandex, the New York Times, and The Walt Disney Company have in common?

A: schema.org

On June 2, 2011, schema.org was launched with little fanfare, but it quickly received a lot of attention. Now, almost exactly one year later, we have assembled a panel of experts from the organizations listed above to discuss what has happened since and what we have to look forward to as the vocabulary continues to grow and evolve, including up-to-the-minute news and announcements. The panel will take place at the upcoming Semantic Technology and Business Conference in San Francisco.

Moderated by Ivan Herman, the Semantic Web Activity Lead for the World Wide Web Consortium, the panel includes representatives from each of the core search engines involved in schema.org, and two of the largest early implementers: The New York Times and Disney. Among the topics we will discuss will be the value proposition of using schema.org markup, publishing techniques and syntaxes, vocabularies that have been mapped to schema.org, current tools and applications, existing implementations, and a look forward at what is planned and what is needed to encourage adoption and consumption.

Panelists:

photo of Ivan Herman Moderator: Ivan Herman
Semantic Web Activity Lead,
World Wide Web Consortium
Photo of Dan Brickley Dan Brickley
Contractor,
schema.org at Google
Photo of John Giannandrea John Giannandrea
Director Engineering,
Google
Photo of Peter Mika Peter Mika
Senior Researcher,
Yahoo!
Photo of Alexander Shubin Alexander Shubin
Product Manager,
Head of Strategic Direction,
Yandex
Photo of Mike Van Snellenberg Mike Van Snellenberg
Principal Program Manager,
Microsoft/Bing
Photo of Evan Sandhaus Evan Sandhaus
Semantic Technologist,
New York Times Company
Photo of Jeffrey Preston Jeffrey W. Preston
SEO Manager,
Disney Interactive Media Group

These panelists, along with the rest of the more than 120 speakers from SemTechBiz, will be on-hand to answer audience questions and discuss the latest work in Semantic Technologies. You can join the discussion by registering for SemTechBiz – San Francisco today (and save $200 off the onsite price)

 

Semantic Commerce: Structuring Your Retail Website for the Next Generation Web

Are you wondering why your product pages don’t stand out in search results like those from Amazon (shown below) or other competing e-commerce websites? These expanded results are commonly known as Rich Snippets (as named by Google) and are the result of having your HTML structured correctly with semantic markup. Whether you’re savvy to HTML5 and the latest design trends, or you haven’t updated your website code in years, this is article will explain why it’s important you structure your data properly utilizing semantic standards.

Sample of Rich Snippet result

There are a number of ways to structure your data to make it more relevant to search engines, as well as social media sites. As an e-commerce retailer it is important to understand which of these standards you should consider including in your website. You should take some time to ensure you are implementing semantic markup, and doing it correctly. It has the power to better inform potential customers with upfront knowledge prior to landing on your site. Customers can see product reviews, pricing and stock information, and even images before clicking through to your website. This can lead to increased click-through rates, improve conversions, and generally enhance your SEO objectives.

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The Semantic Web Has Gone Mainstream! Wanna Bet?

Juan Sequeda photoIn 2005, I started learning about the so-called Semantic Web. It wasn’t till 2008, the same year I started my PhD, that I finally understood what the Semantic Web was really about. At the time, I made a $1000 bet with 3 college buddies that the Semantic Web would be mainstream by the time I finished my PhD. I know I’m going to win! In this post, I will argue why.

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