Posts Tagged ‘IBM Watson’

IBM Watson Group CTO Discusses Cognitive Computing, Content Curation For Healthcare Market

robhighThe role that cognitive computing can play in healthcare was explored last week in this story published at The Semantic Web Blog’s sister site Dataversity.net. That article looked at how Modernizing Medicine is leveraging IBM Watson for its new schEMA tablet app that helps doctors use the wealth of published medical research from highly reputable sources, such as the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and New England Journal of Medicine, to answer their questions.

Today, we’re complementing that article to further explore such aspects of the health care and cognitive computing connection based on an email conversation with IBM Watson Group CTO Robert High. “IBM Watson is transforming the patient experience and healthcare delivery system by helping physicians make sense of the enormous amount of data generated by an increasingly connected healthcare environment,” High writes.

“Content curation is a critical part of the solution delivery process. Without reputable and reliable sources of medical literature, therapy choices offered by Watson may not have the supporting evidence needed to inform clinicians in the use of those treatments. We work with the top clinicians at our partners to collect their feedback on supporting evidence and cull inappropriate information from their sources.” IBM, along with its solutions partners, works with a variety of content providers based on the relevance of their materials to treatment options, he adds.

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Hello 2014 (Part 2)

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Courtesy: Flickr/faul

Picking up from where we left off yesterday, we continue exploring where 2014 may take us in the world of semantics, Linked and Smart Data, content analytics, and so much more.

Marco Neumann, CEO and co-founder, KONA and director, Lotico: On the technology side I am personally looking forward to make use of the new RDF1.1 implementations and the new SPARQL end-point deployment solutions in 2014 The Semantic Web idea is here to stay, though you might call it by a different name (again) in 2014.

Bill Roberts, CEO, Swirrl:   Looking forward to 2014, I see a growing use of Linked Data in open data ‘production’ systems, as opposed to proofs of concept, pilots and test systems.  I expect good progress on taking Linked Data out of the hands of specialists to be used by a broader group of data users.

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Hello 2014

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Courtesy: Flickr/Wonderlane

Yesterday we said a fond farewell to 2013. Today, we look ahead to the New Year, with the help, once again, of our panel of experts:

Phil Archer, Data Activity Lead, W3C:

For me the new Working Groups (WG) are the focus. I think the CSV on the Web WG is going to be an important step in making more data interoperable with Sem Web.

I’d also like to draw attention to the upcoming Linking Geospatial Data workshop in London in March. There have been lots of attempts to use Geospatial data with Linked Data, notably GeoSPARQL of course. But it’s not always easy. We need to make it easier to publish and use data that includes geocoding in some fashion along with the power and functionality of Geospatial Information systems. The workshop brings together W3C, OGC, the UK government [Linked Data Working Group], Ordnance Survey and the geospatial department at Google. It’s going to be big!

[And about] JSON-LD: It’s JSON so Web developers love it, and it’s RDF. I am hopeful that more and more JSON will actually be JSON-LD. Then everyone should be happy.

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What’s Real In Personalized Mobile Healthcare

rsz_rxNews came this week that a man accused of defrauding a financial group out of close to a million dollars around an investment in a fictional mobile medical device tablet is scheduled to sign a plea agreement admitting that he committed mail fraud. The man, Howard Leventhal, had been promoting the Star Trek-influenced McCoy Home Health Care Tablet as a device that can instantaneously deliver detailed patient information to medical providers. (The product is discussed on the company’s still-surviving web site here.) He was arrested for the fraud in October and has been out on bail.

The interesting thing about this case is that the fake he was perpetrating isn’t very far removed from reality regarding the role mobile apps and systems will play in healthcare. There of course are plenty of mobile apps already available that help users do everything from monitoring their hearts to recording their blood-oxygen level during the night to see whether they have sleep apnea. Research and Markets, for example, says the wireless health market currently will grow to nearly $60 billion by 2018, up from $23.8 billion, with remote patient monitoring applications and diagnostics helping to drive the growth. But where things really get interesting is when mobile health takes on questions of semantic interoperability of accumulated data, and assessing its meaning.

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NLP Market Set For Growth; HealthCare Among Leading Early Adopter Industries

rsz_language_pixThe natural language processing (NLP) market is moving ahead at a steady clip. According to the recently released report, Natural Language Processing Market – Worldwide Market Forecast and Analysis (2013 – 2018), the sector is estimated to grow from $3,787.3 million in 2013 to $9,858.4 million in 2018. That’s an estimated 21 percent CAGR.

The report considers the market to factor in multiple technologies — recognition technologies such as Interactive Voice Response, Optical Character Recognition, and pattern and image recognition; operational technologies such as auto coding and classification and categorization technologies; and text analytics and speech analytics technologies; as well as machine translation, information extraction and question-answer report generation.

Driving the uptake, the report notes, is the need to enhance customer experiences, especially in an age when the smartphone rules, and Big Data predominates. Big-time industry adopters of the technology, it cites, are healthcare, banking and financial services, and e-commerce, where a big growth in real-time and unstructured customer data and transaction information can be taken in hand by NLP technology to analyze customer needs and then optimize responses to them, taking out some of the human labor costs of doing so.

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Treo Gives Direction For Answering Queries Over Graph Data

treonewLater this year, expect to see an open source version of Treo, a semantic search and question answering system designed to help organizations deal particularly with the variety problem of Big Data. A Digital Enterprise Research Institute (DERI) thesis project that’s headed up by fifth-year PhD candidate and Amtera Semantic Technologies co-founder André Freitas, Treo (which means ‘direction’ in Gallic) aims to take on highly heterogeneous databases with thousands or even millions of attributes, via a natural language and intuitive interface to “talk” to that data.

“Treo,” says Freitas, “is kind of an elegant algorithm to use distributional semantics for answering queries over graph data.”

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IBM’s Watson: The Smartest Thing on Earth?

Geek Exchange recently wrote, “Now researchers and students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) have been given the chance to see what Watson can do beyond trouncing Jeopardy champions. That in mind, Geek sat down with the head of RPI’s Computer Science Department, Dr. James A. Hendler, whose research has included robotics, A.I., the semantic Web and Big Data. Hendler offered us a glimpse into the future of Watson, the coming of ‘memory prosthetics’ and revealed whether Watson would be a good Dungeons & Dragons player.” Read more

Must-Attend Keynote Sessions at SemTechBiz NYC

The Semantic Technology and Business Conference is heading back to the Big Apple in October. The conference — which will take place October 15-17 in New York City — will feature keynote speeches from top movers and shakers in the fields of Semantic Web Technology, Big Data, Enterprise Semantics, and more. Registration for the event is now open.

Keynote Presentations

Watson Goes Back to School – And what it tells us about the evolving role of semantic technology
by Christopher Welty, Research Scientist – IBM Research

Photo of Chris WeltyIn the traditional vision of AI, understanding flowed from perception through language to knowledge… This is the root of all semantic technology today. However, over time, the failure of the AI community to achieve this end-to-end vision made many, especially those in NLP, question the endpoint. In this talk, we show that it was the vision, not the technology, that deserved to be doubted. Semantic technology has significant value in accomplishing tasks that require understanding, but it is not the endpoint. Read more

The Semantic Web Has Gone Mainstream! Wanna Bet?

Juan Sequeda photoIn 2005, I started learning about the so-called Semantic Web. It wasn’t till 2008, the same year I started my PhD, that I finally understood what the Semantic Web was really about. At the time, I made a $1000 bet with 3 college buddies that the Semantic Web would be mainstream by the time I finished my PhD. I know I’m going to win! In this post, I will argue why.

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Cry Me A River, But First Let’s Agree About What A River Is

How do you define a forest? How about deforestation? It sounds like it would be fairly easy to get agreement on those terms. But beyond the basics – that a definition for the first would reflect that a forest is a place with lots of trees and the second would reflect that it’s a place where there used to be lots of trees – it’s not so simple.

And that has consequences for everything from academic and scientific research to government programs. As explained by Krzysztof Janowicz,  perfectly valid definitions for these and other geographic terms exist by the hundreds, in legal texts and government documents and elsewhere, and most of them don’t agree with each other. So, how can one draw good conclusions or make important decisions when the data informing those is all over the map, so to speak.

“You cannot ask to show me a map of the forests in North America because the definition of forest differs between not just the U.S. and Canada but also between U.S. member states,” says Janowicz, Assistant Professor for geographic information science at UC Santa Barbara who’s one of the organizers of this week’s GeoVoCamp focusing on geo-ontology design patterns and bottom-up, data-driven semantics.

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