Posts Tagged ‘IBM Watson’

Cleveland Clinic And IBM Watson To Tackle DNA Mutations

ibmwatsonlogoLate last month saw IBM expand its existing engagement with the Cleveland Clinic around its deployment of IBM Watson technology to cover new domains. The vendor already has worked with faculty, physicians and students at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University on a project to develop Watson-related cognitive technologies to help physicians make more informed and accurate decisions faster and to cull new insights from electronic medical records. Now, the Lerner Research Institute’s Genomic Medicine Institute at Cleveland Clinic will evaluate Watson’s ability to help oncologists develop more personalized care to patients for a variety of cancers.

Watson is being leveraged by other institutions in the field of cancer care, including Memorial Sloan Kettering and MD Anderson. The new venture with Cleveland Clinic is focused on identifying patterns in genome sequencing and medical data to unlock insights that will help clinicians bring the promise of genomic medicine to their patients, using Watson’s cognitive system, deep computational biology models and IBM’s public cloud infrastructure SoftLayer, IBM says.

“There is a lot of work going on in the cancer area,” says Steve Harvey, IBM VP of Watson Cancer Genomics. This latest partnership aims to work toward identifying drugs that might be relevant to treat a particular patient’s condition by working from the understanding that cancer is a disease of DNA, and by leveraging the fact that the cost of reading DNA has gone down drastically. Today, it’s possible to take a patient’s normal cell and see the DNA there and compare that to the DNA in a cancer cell to see the differences – the mutations – that can point medical professionals in the direction of what actually is causing the tumor.

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Bring On The Apps For New Cognitive Computing Cloud Platform

CogScalelogoOctober saw the debut of Cognitive Scale’s cognitive cloud platform, which provides sourcing, analyzing and interpreting data of all sorts and context signals on any public cloud infrastructure. The details of the platform for pulling insights out of massive amounts of multi-structured data are covered in a story you can read at our sister site Dataversity.net. Here, The Semantic Web Blog relays some more information about usage scenarios around its services, according to Matt Sanchez, the company’s founder, chief technology officer, and vice president of products.

The platform includes at its top layer vertical applications, and healthcare is a main focus. Guided care applications have a spot here. The role of care managers becomes more important in the changing world of healthcare costs and reimbursements, where patient engagement – especially of the chronically ill – can keep a pediatric asthma patient, for example, from showing up in the ER room, which translates to a high-cost visit. Today, “provider organizations are more incented to be proactive in care,” says Sanchez, which means asking and analyzing who is at risk right now and what can be done to prevent a negative outcome like that.

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IBM Watson Accelerates Global Expansion

watsonNEW YORK – 07 Oct 2014: IBM is announcing significant milestones fueling adoption of Watson and cognitive computing cloud capabilities on a global scale. Watson is a groundbreaking platform that represents a new era of computing based on its ability to interact in natural language, process vast amounts of Big Data to uncover patterns and insights, and learn from each interaction.

On Tuesday, October 7, IBM Watson Group Senior Vice President Mike Rhodin demonstrates Watson at work in its Client Experience Center at its new global headquarters at 51 Astor Place in New York City’s Silicon Alley. Read more

IBM Watson Group CTO Discusses Cognitive Computing, Content Curation For Healthcare Market

robhighThe role that cognitive computing can play in healthcare was explored last week in this story published at The Semantic Web Blog’s sister site Dataversity.net. That article looked at how Modernizing Medicine is leveraging IBM Watson for its new schEMA tablet app that helps doctors use the wealth of published medical research from highly reputable sources, such as the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and New England Journal of Medicine, to answer their questions.

Today, we’re complementing that article to further explore such aspects of the health care and cognitive computing connection based on an email conversation with IBM Watson Group CTO Robert High. “IBM Watson is transforming the patient experience and healthcare delivery system by helping physicians make sense of the enormous amount of data generated by an increasingly connected healthcare environment,” High writes.

“Content curation is a critical part of the solution delivery process. Without reputable and reliable sources of medical literature, therapy choices offered by Watson may not have the supporting evidence needed to inform clinicians in the use of those treatments. We work with the top clinicians at our partners to collect their feedback on supporting evidence and cull inappropriate information from their sources.” IBM, along with its solutions partners, works with a variety of content providers based on the relevance of their materials to treatment options, he adds.

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Hello 2014 (Part 2)

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Courtesy: Flickr/faul

Picking up from where we left off yesterday, we continue exploring where 2014 may take us in the world of semantics, Linked and Smart Data, content analytics, and so much more.

Marco Neumann, CEO and co-founder, KONA and director, Lotico: On the technology side I am personally looking forward to make use of the new RDF1.1 implementations and the new SPARQL end-point deployment solutions in 2014 The Semantic Web idea is here to stay, though you might call it by a different name (again) in 2014.

Bill Roberts, CEO, Swirrl:   Looking forward to 2014, I see a growing use of Linked Data in open data ‘production’ systems, as opposed to proofs of concept, pilots and test systems.  I expect good progress on taking Linked Data out of the hands of specialists to be used by a broader group of data users.

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Hello 2014

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Courtesy: Flickr/Wonderlane

Yesterday we said a fond farewell to 2013. Today, we look ahead to the New Year, with the help, once again, of our panel of experts:

Phil Archer, Data Activity Lead, W3C:

For me the new Working Groups (WG) are the focus. I think the CSV on the Web WG is going to be an important step in making more data interoperable with Sem Web.

I’d also like to draw attention to the upcoming Linking Geospatial Data workshop in London in March. There have been lots of attempts to use Geospatial data with Linked Data, notably GeoSPARQL of course. But it’s not always easy. We need to make it easier to publish and use data that includes geocoding in some fashion along with the power and functionality of Geospatial Information systems. The workshop brings together W3C, OGC, the UK government [Linked Data Working Group], Ordnance Survey and the geospatial department at Google. It’s going to be big!

[And about] JSON-LD: It’s JSON so Web developers love it, and it’s RDF. I am hopeful that more and more JSON will actually be JSON-LD. Then everyone should be happy.

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What’s Real In Personalized Mobile Healthcare

rsz_rxNews came this week that a man accused of defrauding a financial group out of close to a million dollars around an investment in a fictional mobile medical device tablet is scheduled to sign a plea agreement admitting that he committed mail fraud. The man, Howard Leventhal, had been promoting the Star Trek-influenced McCoy Home Health Care Tablet as a device that can instantaneously deliver detailed patient information to medical providers. (The product is discussed on the company’s still-surviving web site here.) He was arrested for the fraud in October and has been out on bail.

The interesting thing about this case is that the fake he was perpetrating isn’t very far removed from reality regarding the role mobile apps and systems will play in healthcare. There of course are plenty of mobile apps already available that help users do everything from monitoring their hearts to recording their blood-oxygen level during the night to see whether they have sleep apnea. Research and Markets, for example, says the wireless health market currently will grow to nearly $60 billion by 2018, up from $23.8 billion, with remote patient monitoring applications and diagnostics helping to drive the growth. But where things really get interesting is when mobile health takes on questions of semantic interoperability of accumulated data, and assessing its meaning.

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NLP Market Set For Growth; HealthCare Among Leading Early Adopter Industries

rsz_language_pixThe natural language processing (NLP) market is moving ahead at a steady clip. According to the recently released report, Natural Language Processing Market – Worldwide Market Forecast and Analysis (2013 – 2018), the sector is estimated to grow from $3,787.3 million in 2013 to $9,858.4 million in 2018. That’s an estimated 21 percent CAGR.

The report considers the market to factor in multiple technologies — recognition technologies such as Interactive Voice Response, Optical Character Recognition, and pattern and image recognition; operational technologies such as auto coding and classification and categorization technologies; and text analytics and speech analytics technologies; as well as machine translation, information extraction and question-answer report generation.

Driving the uptake, the report notes, is the need to enhance customer experiences, especially in an age when the smartphone rules, and Big Data predominates. Big-time industry adopters of the technology, it cites, are healthcare, banking and financial services, and e-commerce, where a big growth in real-time and unstructured customer data and transaction information can be taken in hand by NLP technology to analyze customer needs and then optimize responses to them, taking out some of the human labor costs of doing so.

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Treo Gives Direction For Answering Queries Over Graph Data

treonewLater this year, expect to see an open source version of Treo, a semantic search and question answering system designed to help organizations deal particularly with the variety problem of Big Data. A Digital Enterprise Research Institute (DERI) thesis project that’s headed up by fifth-year PhD candidate and Amtera Semantic Technologies co-founder André Freitas, Treo (which means ‘direction’ in Gallic) aims to take on highly heterogeneous databases with thousands or even millions of attributes, via a natural language and intuitive interface to “talk” to that data.

“Treo,” says Freitas, “is kind of an elegant algorithm to use distributional semantics for answering queries over graph data.”

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IBM’s Watson: The Smartest Thing on Earth?

Geek Exchange recently wrote, “Now researchers and students at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) have been given the chance to see what Watson can do beyond trouncing Jeopardy champions. That in mind, Geek sat down with the head of RPI’s Computer Science Department, Dr. James A. Hendler, whose research has included robotics, A.I., the semantic Web and Big Data. Hendler offered us a glimpse into the future of Watson, the coming of ‘memory prosthetics’ and revealed whether Watson would be a good Dungeons & Dragons player.” Read more

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