Posts Tagged ‘internet of things’

Alex Dayon of Salesforce.com on the Internet of Things

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Bruce Rogers of Forbes recently wrote, “There is a wave of digital disruption coming at CMOs from all fronts. The world has shifted over the past five years, mostly because of the emergence of the ‘internet of things’–a world where nearly everyone and everything is interconnected in a web enabled network. But according to Alex Dayon, former co-founder of Business Objects and now president of Salesforce.com’s applications and platform products, ‘we could call ourselves the ‘internet of customers’ because we’ve always connected devices and apps. It means there’s a customer behind it. By 2020 there will be 50 billion connected devices. And behind every device, whether it’s a smartphone, a car, a toothbrush, or a light bulb, there is a customer’.” Read more

Data-Intensive Businesses Turn to Infobright to Transform Machine-Generated Data into Business Improvements

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TORONTO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Infobright, the database analytics platform for the Internet of Things (IoT), today announced that Rez-1Smart 421, and PayPoint, three data-heavy businesses in the financial services, logistics and transportation industries, selected Infobright’s Enterprise Edition to transform their machine-generated data into business insights. The Infobright analytic database platform enables customers to interrogate machine and IoT generated data to quickly identify the patterns that drive smarter business decisions. Read more

Why the Role of the Data Scientist is Growing

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Kevin Casey of Information Week recently wrote, “Old-school organizations will fuel the next swell of data-driven initiatives in IT. So what’s in store for the early movers and, specifically, their big-data professionals? How will the data scientist and similar roles evolve? ‘The role is becoming bigger,’ said Olly Downs, chief scientist at big-data analytics firm Globys, in a recent interview. By bigger, he means in every way — what was once a niche is now, at least in some companies, a driving force.” Read more

UK Tech Consortium Develops HyperCat for the Internet of Things

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M2M World News reports, “A consortium of more than 40 UK-based technology companies funded by the UK’s innovation agency, Technology Strategy Board, has delivered on the first phase of its initiative to accelerate the widespread move to the Internet of Things (IoT). HyperCat is a new open IoT specification that allows machines to work together over the Internet and for applications to discover and make sense of data automatically without human intervention. In just 12 months and with £6.4 million funding from the Technology Strategy Board, development teams from major companies including ARM, BT and IBM have worked alongside UK start-ups and UK University Departments to break down vertical data silos and find a foundation for connected products and applications to interoperate.” Read more

Microsoft Assists Internet of Things

AllSeen Alliance logoPhil Goldstein of FierceWireless reported that, “Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) joined the AllSeen Alliance, an open-source project founded on Qualcomm technology and aimed at coming up with a standard to connect devices and have them interact as part of the Internet of Things. The software giant’s participation in the group adds heft to its membership, which has been largely dominated by consumer electronics and home appliance makers.The AllSeen Alliance’s leading members include Haier, LG Electronics, Panasonic and Sharp, and in total the group now has 51 members. Adding Microsoft could ensure that future Windows devices interact with other connected gadgets via the AllSeen Alliance’s specifications.”

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Infoblox Reveals Network Concerns for Internet of Things

image of At;as supporting the weight of the planet Earth.Charlie Osborne of ZDNet reported that, “Enterprises are ready to profit from the Internet of Things (IoT), but security concerns and network capacity worries are holding back deployment. According to a recent survey commissioned by network control company Infoblox, the majority of IT professionals believe that IoT is a potentially lucrative market, but there may not be enough network capacity to handle the demand that will accompany an anticipated explosion in the number of connected devices. The research, carried out in May, was conducted online and collected 400 responses from US and UK network managers and executives involved in building, running, and managing enterprise networks at firms with over 1,000 employees. The majority of respondents — 90 percent — are either planning or already implementing solutions to cope with the increased demands on networking caused by IoT projects.”

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Many More Developers Needed for IoT

Photo of young person learning computing.Matt Asay of ReadWrite reported, “It’s standard to size a market by the number of widgets sold, but in the Internet of Things, which numbers sensors and devices in the billions, widget counts don’t really matter. In part this is because the real money in IoT is not in the ‘things,’ but rather in the Internet-enabled services that stitch them together. More to the point, it’s because the size of the IoT market fundamentally depends on the number of developers creating value in it. While today there are just 300,000 developers contributing to the IoT, a new report from VisionMobile projects a whopping 4.5 million developers by 2020, reflecting a 57% compound annual growth rate and a massive market opportunity.”

The author continued with, “In the last 30 years we’ve created a fair amount of data, but it pales compared to what we’ve generated just in the last two years. Ninety percent of the world’s data was generated in the last two years alone, much of it by machines. Such machine-produced data dwarfs human-generated data. In such an IoT world, devices are not the problem. According to Gartner, we’ll have 26 billion of them by 2020. Connecting them isn’t, either. As VisionMobile’s report makes clear, however, ‘making sense of data’ is the real challenge. It’s also the big opportunity…”

 

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Photo courtesy flickr / kelliamanda

Internet of Things Impacts Big Data

depiction of internet of things objectsAccording to Mike Kavis of Forbes, “Companies are jumping on the Internet of Things (IoT) bandwagon and for good reasons. McKinsey Global Institute reports that the IoT business will deliver $6.2 trillion of revenue by 2025. Many people wonder if companies are ready for this explosion of data generated for IoT? As with any new technology, security is always the first point of resistance. I agree that IoT brings a wave of new security concerns but the bigger concern is how woefully prepared most data centers are for the massive amount of data coming from all of the “things” in the near future.”

Kavis went on to write that, “Some companies are still hanging on to the belief that they can manage their own data centers better than the various cloud providers out there. This state of denial should all but go away when the influx of petabyte scale data becomes a reality for enterprises. Enterprises are going to have to ask themselves, “Do we want to be in the infrastructure business?” because that is what it will take to provide the appropriate amount of bandwidth, disk storage, and compute power to keep up with the demand for data ingestion, storage, and real-time analytics that will serve the business needs. If there ever was a use case for the cloud, the IoT and Big Data is it. Processing all of the data from the IoT is an exercise in big data that boils down to three major steps: data ingestion (harvesting data), data storage, and analytics.”

 

To read a different perspective on these challenges and how Semantic Web technologies play a role in them, read Irene Polikoff’s recent guest post, “RDF is Critical to a Successful Internet of Things.

 

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The Data Behind the Internet of Things

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Nancy Gohring of Computerworld recently wrote, “The market for connected devices like fitness wearables, smart watches and smart glasses, not to mention remote sensing devices that track the health of equipment, is expected to soar in the coming years. By 2020, Gartner expects, 26 billion units will make up the Internet of Things, and that excludes PCs, tablets and smartphones. With so many sensors collecting data about equipment status, environmental conditions and human activities, companies are growing rich with information. The question becomes: What to do with it all? How to process it most effectively and use it in the smartest way possible?” Read more

Watch This: Apple’s Expanding Internet of Things At This Week’s Developers’ Conference

iotpixAs Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference gets underway this week, speculation continues about whether we’ll see a preview of the long-awaited iWatch smart watch, along with more expected developments such as an update to the OS X operating system to bring it closer to resembling Apple’s mobile operating system experience. Rumors tout the iWatch as a device that will run iOS and include biometrics and health and fitness capabilities.

But even if the watch doesn’t appear until later this year, Apple’s timing is still on the right track – as is Microsoft’s fitness-focused, heart-rate monitoring smartwatch that is expected to debut this summer.

new report from technology research firm ON World that surveyed 1,000 U.S. consumers finds that “wristworn devices are preferred by the majority of consumers who are most interested in a general purpose smart watch rather than dedicated fitness devices such as activity trackers and heart rate monitors.”  One in five consumers either have or are planning to purchase a wearable technology product by next year and close to one-third are likely to purchase a wearable technology within two years, it finds.

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