Posts Tagged ‘internet of things’

A Venture Capitalist’s Take on the Internet of Things

photo of Nest ProtectDavid Hirsch, co-founder of Metamorphic Ventures, recently wrote for Tech Crunch, “There has been a lot of talk in the venture capital industry about automating the home and leveraging Internet-enabled devices for various functions. The first wave of this was the use of the smartphone as a remote control to manage, for instance, a thermostat. The thermostat then begins to recognize user habits and adapt to them, helping consumers save money. A lot of people took notice of this first-generation automation capability when Google bought Nest for a whopping $3.2 billion. But this purchase was never about Nest; rather, it was Google’s foray into the next phase of the Internet of Things.” Read more

Colorado Learns about The Internet of Things

Still image from the video about Internet of Things (source: New York Times)The Denver Post recently reported that, “After a strong earthquake rattled Napa Valley early Sunday, California device maker Jawbone found out how many of its UP wristband users were shaken from their sleep and stayed up. About 93 percent of its customers within 15 miles of Napa, Calif., didn’t go back to sleep after the 6.0 quake struck at 3:20 a.m., said Andrew Rosenthal, senior product engineer for wellness at Jawbone. But what use could come from that information? “Why not tell people to go to work at 11 a.m. on Monday,” he said. The anecdote represents just one example of information being generated by what technologists call “The Internet of Things,” a topic Rosenthal and other panelists discussed Tuesday at the Colorado Innovation Network Summit in Denver. The summit continues Wednesday at the Denver Performing Arts Complex.”.

The article also states, “As recently as 2005, most households had “The Internet of Thing” — a desktop or laptop computer connected to the Internet, said Eric Schaefer, general manager of communications, data and mobility for Comcast Communications.

By 2010, “The Internet of Wireless Things” started to appear with the rising popularity of smartphones and tablets. The next phase is what Schaefer called “The Internet of Disjointed Things.” Schaefer described one co-worker who has 25 applications to run items in his home, many on different platforms. He predicts that those systems, by 2020, will communicate and operate with one another and be everywhere, a trend that ever-increasing broadband capacity will allow.”

Read more here.

Britain Capitalizes on Internet of Things?

Photo of the Union Jack courtesy flickr / defenceimagesGerard Grech recently wrote, “When you hear the term “the internet of things”, what immediately comes to mind? If you’ve been following recent stories in the media, you might have it pegged as the Big New Thing to revolutionise all our lives any minute now. Equally, you might be forgiven for thinking it’s a lot of hype generated by overexcited tech types and inflated billion-dollar deals. The truth, as ever, lies somewhere in the middle. The combination of connected products, together with intelligent data analysis, has the potential to transform the way we produce goods, run machinery, manage our cities and improve our lives. The internet of things is a real phenomenon and will take off in much the same way as the worldwide web did back in the 1990s.”

Grech continued, “And, just like the web, the full deployment of IoT across industries will take time, talent and persistence. The question is not whether it is going to happen, but what part the UK will play in it all. Consumers stand to benefit from electricity meters that talk to the grid to get the best deals, and health monitors that provide minute-by-minute data on people’s heart rates. With Google’s acquisition of Nest Labs and Samsung’s recent purchase of SmartThings, we will soon have access to a suite of clever gadgets that will create our future “smart” home. It’s a beguiling vision, albeit one with alarm bells (privacy and security obviously need resolving). But the real power of the internet of things lies beyond eye-catching consumer goods.”

Read more here.

Image courtesy flickr / defenceimages

Gartner Reports ‘Internet of Things’ Tops the Technology Hype Cycle

Gartner_2014-2Gil Press of Forbes reports, “Gartner released last week its latest Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies. Last year, big data reigned supreme, at what Gartner calls the ‘peak of inflated expectations.’  But now big data has moved down the ‘trough of disillusionment’ replaced by the Internet of Things at the top of the hype cycle.  In 2012 and in 2013 Gartner’s analysts thought that the Internet of Things had more than 10 years to reach the ‘plateau of productivity’ but this year they give it five to ten years to reach this final stage of maturity. The Internet of Things, says Gartner, ‘is becoming a vibrant part of our, our customers’ and our partners’ business and IT landscape’.” Read more

HyperCat Gets a British Boost for the Internet of Things

hypercatSteve Ranger of ZDnet reports, “A group trying to make it easier for Internet of Things devices and services to work together has won £1.6m in funding from the UK government’s Technology Strategy Board. The group of 40 companies — including BT, ARM, and KPMG — is working on a standard for IoT interoperability called HyperCat. The new funding adds to the £6.4m the government has already spent on the project. The idea behind IoT is that everyday items such as thermostats or plant pots can be networked to create new types of services — at a trivial level, for example, a plant pot could tell a thermostat to turn off the heating because the plants were drying out. However, IoT has great potential to enable smart cities and other forms of automation too.” Read more

Facebook Messenger, The Internet of Things, and Your Privacy

messengerDaniel Newman of Forbes recently wrote, “Over the last month there has been an unfathomable amount of content published about the massive privacy intrusion that is Facebook Messenger. With the ability to intrude into the lives of its users in ways that the NSA would never think to, it isn’t a surprise that the new download brought such strong opinions; many of which served as recommendations to not download the application. The good news about the widespread dialogue on messenger is that it brought to light the issues that surround privacy of data. Further implicating what some of us have always known. “When the service is free, the user is the product.” Make sense? In other words, when companies like Facebook create applications that we use in our everyday lives, for free, the real price is in what we sacrifice for the right to use the application for free, our data.” Read more

How the Internet of Things is Delivering Smarter Choices

8528725328_ffe4ba4283Sarah Austin, founder of Peak Energies recently wrote for Forbes, “The Valley bubble seems obsessed with the Internet of Things. Things are getting smarter. Devices talk to each other and people are now starting to talk to them. Things are evolving to make decisions, gather information and just take care of stuff for us. For a lot of people, it sounds too crazy. But we already benefit from the start of this shift. Take a Thai restaurant for example. You ask your phone to find you nearby Thai food, and it gives you a list of options. But why doesn’t it filter out obviously bad ones? Or determine that it only need show the closest location of the restaurant chain, and that if two places have a nearly identical menu, but one is 20 percent more expensive and a mile further away, it shouldn’t come up in your immediate results? This is the future of tech. As humans, we want choices, but we don’t want 100 choices. Read more

Semantic Search is the Future of Marketing

droidsDaniel Newman of Forbes recently wrote, “Businesses today are largely online and they have in droves taken their web presence from where it was a few years ago which was likely an “Online Brochure” to some type of second generation website that considers trends such as social media, content marketing, and of course search engine optimization. The reason we as business owners do all of this isn’t because we love technology (not all of us, at least), but rather because we know that people are doing more and more of their research about what they want to buy, and who from, online.” Read more

A Semantic Data Ecosystem in the Oil and Gas Sector in Norway

image of Norwegian oil rig in fog.Like the oil and gas itself, data from oil and gas operations associated with the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) is also flowing. Through a number of semantically enabled hubs, it is getting integrated, refined, and distributed to different parties. EPIM, the Exploration & Production Information Management Association, is implementing its vision of a shared suite of knowledge based-applications for the Norwegian Oil & Gas industry built using semantic web standards and the domain concepts from ISO 15926 [Wikipedia].

In this brief article, we give an overview of the three applications EPIM currently in deployment (shown in the graphic below).

ISO 15926

In building and deploying these applications, some key features and insights applicable to other applications that involve data integration across diverse systems emerge:

  • A semantic ecosystem needs to accommodate flexible co-existence with other technologies, notably XML and JSON. All applications in EPIM’s vision of integration involve interoperability with these and other technologies;
  • ISO 15926 has been effective for supporting EPIM’s reporting needs, but can present a challenge, in terms of its complexity, for efficiently harnessing it within evolvable, model-driven solutions. The successful work with these models demonstrates that semantic web standards are sufficiently mature, rich and powerful to handle very complex models;
  • Model-driven approaches using semantic technologies, especially SPARQL and technologies that build on it, are highly effective for extensible applications. Development and deployment responsiveness to changing requirements proved to be very rapid.

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Alex Dayon of Salesforce.com on the Internet of Things

salesforce

Bruce Rogers of Forbes recently wrote, “There is a wave of digital disruption coming at CMOs from all fronts. The world has shifted over the past five years, mostly because of the emergence of the ‘internet of things’–a world where nearly everyone and everything is interconnected in a web enabled network. But according to Alex Dayon, former co-founder of Business Objects and now president of Salesforce.com’s applications and platform products, ‘we could call ourselves the ‘internet of customers’ because we’ve always connected devices and apps. It means there’s a customer behind it. By 2020 there will be 50 billion connected devices. And behind every device, whether it’s a smartphone, a car, a toothbrush, or a light bulb, there is a customer’.” Read more

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