Posts Tagged ‘interview’

Cognitive Computing and Humanity

watsonThe Wharton School of Business recently wrote, “Knowledge@Wharton spoke with Brad Becker, chief design officer for IBM Watson, about current and future applications of cognitive computing and how he hopes to make computers ‘more humane.’ An edited version of the conversation follows.” Asked how his background in user experience design affects his role in the Watson project, Becker commented, “[It’s based on] the idea that technology should work for people, not the other way around. For a long time, people have worked to better understand technology. Watson is technology that works to understand us. It’s more humane, it’s helpful to humans, it speaks our language, it can deal with ambiguity, it can create hypotheses, it can learn from us. And, of course, since it’s a computer, it can scale as much as needed and has recall far beyond what humans have.” Read more

Jeff Hawkins on the Future of Artificial Intelligence

3214197147_a36c631f71Derrick Harris of GigaOM recently wrote, “Jeff Hawkins is best known for bringing us the Palm Pilot, but he’s working on something that could be much, much bigger. For the past several years, Hawkins has been studying how the human brain functions with the hope of replicating it in software. In 2004, he published a book about his findings. In 2012, Numenta, the company he founded to commercialize his work, finally showed itself to the world after roughly seven years operating in stealth mode. I recently spoke with Hawkins to get his take on why his approach to artificial intelligence will ultimately overtake other approaches, including the white-hot field of deep learning. We also discussed how Numenta has survived some early business hiccups and how he plans to keep the lights on and the money flowing in.” Read more

How Natural Language Processing and Big Data are Making Sense of Consumer Behavior

ATTENSITY LOGODana Gardner of CRM Buyer recently wrote, “The power of Big Data technology is being successfully applied to understanding such complex unknowns as consumer sentiment and even intent. That understanding then vastly improves how retailers and myriad service providers manage their users’ experiences — increasingly in real time. Fortunately, today’s consumers are quite willing to share their intents and sentiments via social media, if you can gather and process the information. Hence the rapidly developing field of social customer relationship management, or Social CRM.” Read more

Microsoft Data Architect Talks Azure ML and the Future of Machine Learning

azuremlMary Branscombe of Tech Radar recently wrote, “We had the opportunity to interview Roger Barga, one of the architects of the Azure ML, Microsoft’s machine learning cloud service, to discuss various aspects of the system. ‘The ranking algorithm that’s in our regression module, the same one running Bing search and serving up ranked results,’ Barga told TechRadar Pro. ‘It’s our implementation on Azure but all the heuristics and know-how came from the years of experience running it. The same recommendation module we have in Azure ML is the same recommendation module that serves up in Xbox what player to play against next.’ Azure ML can look at a document, work out what it’s about and look those topics up on Bing. ‘We can say this is a company, this is a person, this is a product,’ explains Barga. ‘That’s the same way Delve will find documents and discussions and messages that you’ll want to see’.” Read more

Ron Kaplan of Nuance Communications on the Future of Artificial Intelligence

ronPeter Rothman of h+ Magazine writes, “I recently got together with Ron Kaplan who is a well known artificial intelligence researcher in the area of natural language processing. Ron is a Distinguished Scientist at Nuance Communications. The conversation is about 1 hour long and the main theme was the recent comments about dangers from artificial intelligence made by Professor Stephen Hawking and also Elon Musk, Eugene Goostman the chatbot that supposedly passed the Turing Test.  Beyond this, the conversation ranges near and far covering and whether it is ridiculous to suggest that Siri is a conscious being, reflective computing, NL interfaces and access to knowledge, communicating with wives, the effects of my diet, and the future of human languages when universal translation becomes widely available.” Read more

Elliot Turner of AlchemyAPI on Natural Language Processing

Alchemy API

Seth Grimes posted to Smart Data Collective a conversation he had with Elliot Turner of AlchemyAPI. He asked Turner, “How well are we doing with Natural Language Processing, noting that formally, ‘processing’ includes both understanding and generation, two parts of a conversation?” Turner responded, “Google has trained us to search using keywords, and this won’t change overnight. But the trend is easy to spot: the interactive question-answering capabilities made famous by IBM’s Watson will become commonplace, offered at a fraction of today’s costs and made available as easy-to-integrate web services.” Read more

Nuance on the Future of Natural Language Processing

Nuance

Gopal Sathe of NDTV Gadgets recently wrote, “We caught up with Sunny Rao, the MD of Nuance Communications India and South East Asia, and chatted about the developments in speech recognition, frustrations with using speech-to-text software and how the way we interact with our devices is about to change forever. Rao speaks like a person who has been talking to machines for a long time – his speech is clear, and there’s a small space around each word for maximum clarity. Over tea, we’re able to discuss how voice recognition is being used around the world, and how he sees the future of the technology shaping up. And naturally, we talked about the movie Her.” Read more

Import.io Turns Any Website Into an API for Free

importio

Max Smolaks of Tech Week Europe reports, “Andrew Fogg, co-founder of the UK start-up Import.io, thinks every web resource should have an Application Programming Interface (API). In order to make online data more accessible, his company turns any website into a spreadsheet or an API, for free. Fogg claims that in the past few months, the users of this service have created more Web APIs than the rest of the Internet combined. Jerome Bouteiller has interviewed the entrepreneur at LeWeb 2013 conference in Paris, where the two discussed the future of the company and the idea of the Semantic Web, proposed by the ‘father of the Internet’ Sir Tim Berners-Lee.” Read more

How Locu Proved Its $70M Worth

locu

Andrea Huspeni of Entrepreneur.com reports, “The internet has been around for decades, but many mom-and-pop shops continue to drag their feet when it comes to creating an online presence. To help, there’s Locu, a service that allows companies to create a digital footprint through self-service tools. Four Massachusetts Institute of Technology students — working out of a lab put on by Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web — founded the site in 2011. Locu has managed to get 30,000 businesses to sign up for it service, by providing an easy-to-use dashboard for small business marketing materials. So it allows companies to update online content like menus and pricing lists. The company works on a freemium model, offering some of its basic services for free, with additional benefits costing $25 a month.” Read more

Jeff Hawkins on Open Source and Machine Learning Meeting Big Data

Simon Phipps of InfoWorld recently wrote, “At OSCON in Portland, Ore., last month, I had the chance to meet Jeff Hawkins, the inventor of the Palm Pilot and arguably the father of the smartphone. I learned that he is now pioneering the analysis of huge streams of real-time data using insights gained as a neuroscientist. His company offers a product that can learn the characteristics of data streams, predict their future actions, and identifiy anomalies. He has just recently taken the core of that product and released it as a GPLv3-licensed open source project on GitHub so that anyone can build machine intelligence into their systems. Below is a video of our discussion, followed by an edited version of the interview.” Read more

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