Posts Tagged ‘IoT’

A Semantic Data Ecosystem in the Oil and Gas Sector in Norway

image of Norwegian oil rig in fog.Like the oil and gas itself, data from oil and gas operations associated with the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) is also flowing. Through a number of semantically enabled hubs, it is getting integrated, refined, and distributed to different parties. EPIM, the Exploration & Production Information Management Association, is implementing its vision of a shared suite of knowledge based-applications for the Norwegian Oil & Gas industry built using semantic web standards and the domain concepts from ISO 15926 [Wikipedia].

In this brief article, we give an overview of the three applications EPIM currently in deployment (shown in the graphic below).

ISO 15926

In building and deploying these applications, some key features and insights applicable to other applications that involve data integration across diverse systems emerge:

  • A semantic ecosystem needs to accommodate flexible co-existence with other technologies, notably XML and JSON. All applications in EPIM’s vision of integration involve interoperability with these and other technologies;
  • ISO 15926 has been effective for supporting EPIM’s reporting needs, but can present a challenge, in terms of its complexity, for efficiently harnessing it within evolvable, model-driven solutions. The successful work with these models demonstrates that semantic web standards are sufficiently mature, rich and powerful to handle very complex models;
  • Model-driven approaches using semantic technologies, especially SPARQL and technologies that build on it, are highly effective for extensible applications. Development and deployment responsiveness to changing requirements proved to be very rapid.

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Data-Intensive Businesses Turn to Infobright to Transform Machine-Generated Data into Business Improvements

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TORONTO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Infobright, the database analytics platform for the Internet of Things (IoT), today announced that Rez-1Smart 421, and PayPoint, three data-heavy businesses in the financial services, logistics and transportation industries, selected Infobright’s Enterprise Edition to transform their machine-generated data into business insights. The Infobright analytic database platform enables customers to interrogate machine and IoT generated data to quickly identify the patterns that drive smarter business decisions. Read more

UK Tech Consortium Develops HyperCat for the Internet of Things

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M2M World News reports, “A consortium of more than 40 UK-based technology companies funded by the UK’s innovation agency, Technology Strategy Board, has delivered on the first phase of its initiative to accelerate the widespread move to the Internet of Things (IoT). HyperCat is a new open IoT specification that allows machines to work together over the Internet and for applications to discover and make sense of data automatically without human intervention. In just 12 months and with £6.4 million funding from the Technology Strategy Board, development teams from major companies including ARM, BT and IBM have worked alongside UK start-ups and UK University Departments to break down vertical data silos and find a foundation for connected products and applications to interoperate.” Read more

Microsoft Assists Internet of Things

AllSeen Alliance logoPhil Goldstein of FierceWireless reported that, “Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) joined the AllSeen Alliance, an open-source project founded on Qualcomm technology and aimed at coming up with a standard to connect devices and have them interact as part of the Internet of Things. The software giant’s participation in the group adds heft to its membership, which has been largely dominated by consumer electronics and home appliance makers.The AllSeen Alliance’s leading members include Haier, LG Electronics, Panasonic and Sharp, and in total the group now has 51 members. Adding Microsoft could ensure that future Windows devices interact with other connected gadgets via the AllSeen Alliance’s specifications.”

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Infoblox Reveals Network Concerns for Internet of Things

image of At;as supporting the weight of the planet Earth.Charlie Osborne of ZDNet reported that, “Enterprises are ready to profit from the Internet of Things (IoT), but security concerns and network capacity worries are holding back deployment. According to a recent survey commissioned by network control company Infoblox, the majority of IT professionals believe that IoT is a potentially lucrative market, but there may not be enough network capacity to handle the demand that will accompany an anticipated explosion in the number of connected devices. The research, carried out in May, was conducted online and collected 400 responses from US and UK network managers and executives involved in building, running, and managing enterprise networks at firms with over 1,000 employees. The majority of respondents — 90 percent — are either planning or already implementing solutions to cope with the increased demands on networking caused by IoT projects.”

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Many More Developers Needed for IoT

Photo of young person learning computing.Matt Asay of ReadWrite reported, “It’s standard to size a market by the number of widgets sold, but in the Internet of Things, which numbers sensors and devices in the billions, widget counts don’t really matter. In part this is because the real money in IoT is not in the ‘things,’ but rather in the Internet-enabled services that stitch them together. More to the point, it’s because the size of the IoT market fundamentally depends on the number of developers creating value in it. While today there are just 300,000 developers contributing to the IoT, a new report from VisionMobile projects a whopping 4.5 million developers by 2020, reflecting a 57% compound annual growth rate and a massive market opportunity.”

The author continued with, “In the last 30 years we’ve created a fair amount of data, but it pales compared to what we’ve generated just in the last two years. Ninety percent of the world’s data was generated in the last two years alone, much of it by machines. Such machine-produced data dwarfs human-generated data. In such an IoT world, devices are not the problem. According to Gartner, we’ll have 26 billion of them by 2020. Connecting them isn’t, either. As VisionMobile’s report makes clear, however, ‘making sense of data’ is the real challenge. It’s also the big opportunity…”

 

Read more here.

 

Photo courtesy flickr / kelliamanda

Internet of Things Impacts Big Data

depiction of internet of things objectsAccording to Mike Kavis of Forbes, “Companies are jumping on the Internet of Things (IoT) bandwagon and for good reasons. McKinsey Global Institute reports that the IoT business will deliver $6.2 trillion of revenue by 2025. Many people wonder if companies are ready for this explosion of data generated for IoT? As with any new technology, security is always the first point of resistance. I agree that IoT brings a wave of new security concerns but the bigger concern is how woefully prepared most data centers are for the massive amount of data coming from all of the “things” in the near future.”

Kavis went on to write that, “Some companies are still hanging on to the belief that they can manage their own data centers better than the various cloud providers out there. This state of denial should all but go away when the influx of petabyte scale data becomes a reality for enterprises. Enterprises are going to have to ask themselves, “Do we want to be in the infrastructure business?” because that is what it will take to provide the appropriate amount of bandwidth, disk storage, and compute power to keep up with the demand for data ingestion, storage, and real-time analytics that will serve the business needs. If there ever was a use case for the cloud, the IoT and Big Data is it. Processing all of the data from the IoT is an exercise in big data that boils down to three major steps: data ingestion (harvesting data), data storage, and analytics.”

 

To read a different perspective on these challenges and how Semantic Web technologies play a role in them, read Irene Polikoff’s recent guest post, “RDF is Critical to a Successful Internet of Things.

 

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Google’s Nest Labs Contributes to Internet of Things

photo of Nest  ThermostatPreviously, it was reported on SemanticWeb.com that Google had acquired Nest Labs. Steve Lohr of The New York Times recently opined that: “Google did not pay $3.2 billion for Nest Labs this year just because it designed a smart thermostat that has redefined that humble household device. No, Google also bought into the vision of Nest’s founders, Tony Fadell and Matt Rogers, a pair of prominent Apple alumni, that the Nest thermostat is one step toward what they call the conscious home. That means a home brimming with artificial intelligence, whose devices learn about and adapt to its human occupants, for greater energy savings, convenience and security. Last Friday, Nest moved to broaden its reach in the home, buying a fast-growing maker of Internet-connected video cameras, DropCam, for $555 million. And on Tuesday, Nest is expected to announce a software strategy backed by manufacturing partners and a venture fund from Google Ventures and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers.”

The author added: “Nest’s is the third high-profile announcement this month about software to link devices in the home in a network known as the consumer Internet of Things. At its Worldwide Developers Conference this month, Apple introduced HomeKit, its technology for linking and controlling smart home devices. HomeKit uses the iOS operating system, the software engine of iPhones and iPads. Quirky, a start-up that manufactures and sells products based on crowdsourced ideas, on Monday announced the creation of a separate software company, Wink. Its initiative has attracted the backing of a major retailer, Home Depot, and manufacturers like General Electric, Honeywell and Philips.

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Photo courtesy: flickr/jbritton

RDF is Critical to a Successful Internet of Things

Depiction of RDF and the internet of ThingsDo you still remember a time when a utility company worker came to your house to check your electric meter? For many of us already, this is in the past. Smart meters send information directly to the utility company and as a result, it knows our up-to-the-minute power usage patterns. And, while we don’t yet talk to our ovens or refrigerators through the Internet, many people routinely control thermostats from their smart phones. The emerging Internet of Things is real and we interact with it on the daily basis.

The term Internet of Things refers to devices we wouldn’t traditionally expect to be smart or connected, such as a smoke detector or other home appliance. They are being made ‘smart’ by enabling them to send data to an application. From smart meters to sensors used to track goods in a supply chain, the one thing these devices have in common is that they send data – data that can then be used to create more value by doing things better, faster, cheaper, and more conveniently.

The physical infrastructure needed for these devices to work is largely in place or being put in place quickly. We get immediate first order benefits simply by installing new equipment. For example, having a smart meter provides cost savings because there is no need for a person to come to our houses. Similarly, the ability to change settings on a thermostat remotely can lower our heating costs. However, far vaster changes and benefits are projected or are already beginning to be delivered from inter-connecting the data sent by smart devices:

  • Health: Connecting vital measurements from wearable devices to the vast body of medical information will help to improve our health, fitness and, ultimately, save lives.
  • Communities: Connecting information from embedded devices and sensors will enable more efficient transportation. When a sprinkler system meter understands weather data, it will use water more efficiently. Once utilities start connecting and correlating data from smart meters, they might deliver electricity more efficiently and be more proactive in handling infrastructure problems.
  • Environment: Connecting readings from fields, forests, oceans, and cities about pollution levels, soil moisture, and resource extraction will allow for closer monitoring of problems.
  • Goods and services: Connecting data from sensors and readers installed throughout factories and supply chains will more precisely track materials and speed up and smooth out the manufacture and distribution of goods.

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10 Considerations for Securing the Internet of Things

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Mark O’Neill, VP of Innovation at Axway recently wrote for Silicon Angle, “Welcome to the future, where smart meters monitor your home appliance usage, where fitness devices on your wrist track your heart-rate, and where electric vehicles can take commands from your wristwatch. What does all of this have in common? These innovations are all part of the Internet of Things (IoT). While the Internet of Things is going through a rosy honeymoon period at the moment, security issues are slowly creeping to the surface. There’s a growing awareness that IoT devices are riddled with vulnerabilities, and securing these weaknesses will soon become one of the major priorities for both manufacturers and the people who use them. Let’s examine the top 10 things to consider in detail.” Read more

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