Posts Tagged ‘IoT’

Colorado Learns about The Internet of Things

Still image from the video about Internet of Things (source: New York Times)The Denver Post recently reported that, “After a strong earthquake rattled Napa Valley early Sunday, California device maker Jawbone found out how many of its UP wristband users were shaken from their sleep and stayed up. About 93 percent of its customers within 15 miles of Napa, Calif., didn’t go back to sleep after the 6.0 quake struck at 3:20 a.m., said Andrew Rosenthal, senior product engineer for wellness at Jawbone. But what use could come from that information? “Why not tell people to go to work at 11 a.m. on Monday,” he said. The anecdote represents just one example of information being generated by what technologists call “The Internet of Things,” a topic Rosenthal and other panelists discussed Tuesday at the Colorado Innovation Network Summit in Denver. The summit continues Wednesday at the Denver Performing Arts Complex.”.

The article also states, “As recently as 2005, most households had “The Internet of Thing” — a desktop or laptop computer connected to the Internet, said Eric Schaefer, general manager of communications, data and mobility for Comcast Communications.

By 2010, “The Internet of Wireless Things” started to appear with the rising popularity of smartphones and tablets. The next phase is what Schaefer called “The Internet of Disjointed Things.” Schaefer described one co-worker who has 25 applications to run items in his home, many on different platforms. He predicts that those systems, by 2020, will communicate and operate with one another and be everywhere, a trend that ever-increasing broadband capacity will allow.”

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Britain Capitalizes on Internet of Things?

Photo of the Union Jack courtesy flickr / defenceimagesGerard Grech recently wrote, “When you hear the term “the internet of things”, what immediately comes to mind? If you’ve been following recent stories in the media, you might have it pegged as the Big New Thing to revolutionise all our lives any minute now. Equally, you might be forgiven for thinking it’s a lot of hype generated by overexcited tech types and inflated billion-dollar deals. The truth, as ever, lies somewhere in the middle. The combination of connected products, together with intelligent data analysis, has the potential to transform the way we produce goods, run machinery, manage our cities and improve our lives. The internet of things is a real phenomenon and will take off in much the same way as the worldwide web did back in the 1990s.”

Grech continued, “And, just like the web, the full deployment of IoT across industries will take time, talent and persistence. The question is not whether it is going to happen, but what part the UK will play in it all. Consumers stand to benefit from electricity meters that talk to the grid to get the best deals, and health monitors that provide minute-by-minute data on people’s heart rates. With Google’s acquisition of Nest Labs and Samsung’s recent purchase of SmartThings, we will soon have access to a suite of clever gadgets that will create our future “smart” home. It’s a beguiling vision, albeit one with alarm bells (privacy and security obviously need resolving). But the real power of the internet of things lies beyond eye-catching consumer goods.”

Read more here.

Image courtesy flickr / defenceimages

HyperCat Gets a British Boost for the Internet of Things

hypercatSteve Ranger of ZDnet reports, “A group trying to make it easier for Internet of Things devices and services to work together has won £1.6m in funding from the UK government’s Technology Strategy Board. The group of 40 companies — including BT, ARM, and KPMG — is working on a standard for IoT interoperability called HyperCat. The new funding adds to the £6.4m the government has already spent on the project. The idea behind IoT is that everyday items such as thermostats or plant pots can be networked to create new types of services — at a trivial level, for example, a plant pot could tell a thermostat to turn off the heating because the plants were drying out. However, IoT has great potential to enable smart cities and other forms of automation too.” Read more

A Semantic Data Ecosystem in the Oil and Gas Sector in Norway

image of Norwegian oil rig in fog.Like the oil and gas itself, data from oil and gas operations associated with the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS) is also flowing. Through a number of semantically enabled hubs, it is getting integrated, refined, and distributed to different parties. EPIM, the Exploration & Production Information Management Association, is implementing its vision of a shared suite of knowledge based-applications for the Norwegian Oil & Gas industry built using semantic web standards and the domain concepts from ISO 15926 [Wikipedia].

In this brief article, we give an overview of the three applications EPIM currently in deployment (shown in the graphic below).

ISO 15926

In building and deploying these applications, some key features and insights applicable to other applications that involve data integration across diverse systems emerge:

  • A semantic ecosystem needs to accommodate flexible co-existence with other technologies, notably XML and JSON. All applications in EPIM’s vision of integration involve interoperability with these and other technologies;
  • ISO 15926 has been effective for supporting EPIM’s reporting needs, but can present a challenge, in terms of its complexity, for efficiently harnessing it within evolvable, model-driven solutions. The successful work with these models demonstrates that semantic web standards are sufficiently mature, rich and powerful to handle very complex models;
  • Model-driven approaches using semantic technologies, especially SPARQL and technologies that build on it, are highly effective for extensible applications. Development and deployment responsiveness to changing requirements proved to be very rapid.

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Data-Intensive Businesses Turn to Infobright to Transform Machine-Generated Data into Business Improvements

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TORONTO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Infobright, the database analytics platform for the Internet of Things (IoT), today announced that Rez-1Smart 421, and PayPoint, three data-heavy businesses in the financial services, logistics and transportation industries, selected Infobright’s Enterprise Edition to transform their machine-generated data into business insights. The Infobright analytic database platform enables customers to interrogate machine and IoT generated data to quickly identify the patterns that drive smarter business decisions. Read more

UK Tech Consortium Develops HyperCat for the Internet of Things

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M2M World News reports, “A consortium of more than 40 UK-based technology companies funded by the UK’s innovation agency, Technology Strategy Board, has delivered on the first phase of its initiative to accelerate the widespread move to the Internet of Things (IoT). HyperCat is a new open IoT specification that allows machines to work together over the Internet and for applications to discover and make sense of data automatically without human intervention. In just 12 months and with £6.4 million funding from the Technology Strategy Board, development teams from major companies including ARM, BT and IBM have worked alongside UK start-ups and UK University Departments to break down vertical data silos and find a foundation for connected products and applications to interoperate.” Read more

Microsoft Assists Internet of Things

AllSeen Alliance logoPhil Goldstein of FierceWireless reported that, “Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) joined the AllSeen Alliance, an open-source project founded on Qualcomm technology and aimed at coming up with a standard to connect devices and have them interact as part of the Internet of Things. The software giant’s participation in the group adds heft to its membership, which has been largely dominated by consumer electronics and home appliance makers.The AllSeen Alliance’s leading members include Haier, LG Electronics, Panasonic and Sharp, and in total the group now has 51 members. Adding Microsoft could ensure that future Windows devices interact with other connected gadgets via the AllSeen Alliance’s specifications.”

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Infoblox Reveals Network Concerns for Internet of Things

image of At;as supporting the weight of the planet Earth.Charlie Osborne of ZDNet reported that, “Enterprises are ready to profit from the Internet of Things (IoT), but security concerns and network capacity worries are holding back deployment. According to a recent survey commissioned by network control company Infoblox, the majority of IT professionals believe that IoT is a potentially lucrative market, but there may not be enough network capacity to handle the demand that will accompany an anticipated explosion in the number of connected devices. The research, carried out in May, was conducted online and collected 400 responses from US and UK network managers and executives involved in building, running, and managing enterprise networks at firms with over 1,000 employees. The majority of respondents — 90 percent — are either planning or already implementing solutions to cope with the increased demands on networking caused by IoT projects.”

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Many More Developers Needed for IoT

Photo of young person learning computing.Matt Asay of ReadWrite reported, “It’s standard to size a market by the number of widgets sold, but in the Internet of Things, which numbers sensors and devices in the billions, widget counts don’t really matter. In part this is because the real money in IoT is not in the ‘things,’ but rather in the Internet-enabled services that stitch them together. More to the point, it’s because the size of the IoT market fundamentally depends on the number of developers creating value in it. While today there are just 300,000 developers contributing to the IoT, a new report from VisionMobile projects a whopping 4.5 million developers by 2020, reflecting a 57% compound annual growth rate and a massive market opportunity.”

The author continued with, “In the last 30 years we’ve created a fair amount of data, but it pales compared to what we’ve generated just in the last two years. Ninety percent of the world’s data was generated in the last two years alone, much of it by machines. Such machine-produced data dwarfs human-generated data. In such an IoT world, devices are not the problem. According to Gartner, we’ll have 26 billion of them by 2020. Connecting them isn’t, either. As VisionMobile’s report makes clear, however, ‘making sense of data’ is the real challenge. It’s also the big opportunity…”

 

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Photo courtesy flickr / kelliamanda

Internet of Things Impacts Big Data

depiction of internet of things objectsAccording to Mike Kavis of Forbes, “Companies are jumping on the Internet of Things (IoT) bandwagon and for good reasons. McKinsey Global Institute reports that the IoT business will deliver $6.2 trillion of revenue by 2025. Many people wonder if companies are ready for this explosion of data generated for IoT? As with any new technology, security is always the first point of resistance. I agree that IoT brings a wave of new security concerns but the bigger concern is how woefully prepared most data centers are for the massive amount of data coming from all of the “things” in the near future.”

Kavis went on to write that, “Some companies are still hanging on to the belief that they can manage their own data centers better than the various cloud providers out there. This state of denial should all but go away when the influx of petabyte scale data becomes a reality for enterprises. Enterprises are going to have to ask themselves, “Do we want to be in the infrastructure business?” because that is what it will take to provide the appropriate amount of bandwidth, disk storage, and compute power to keep up with the demand for data ingestion, storage, and real-time analytics that will serve the business needs. If there ever was a use case for the cloud, the IoT and Big Data is it. Processing all of the data from the IoT is an exercise in big data that boils down to three major steps: data ingestion (harvesting data), data storage, and analytics.”

 

To read a different perspective on these challenges and how Semantic Web technologies play a role in them, read Irene Polikoff’s recent guest post, “RDF is Critical to a Successful Internet of Things.

 

Read more here.

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