Posts Tagged ‘JSON-LD’

You Can Help Make Linked Data Core To The Future of Identity, Payment On The Web Platform

ld1At the end of September, The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) may approve the world’s first Web Payments Steering Group, to explore issues such as navigating around obstacles to seamless payments on the web and ways to better facilitate global transactions while respecting local laws. Identity and digital signatures have a role here, at the same time as they go beyond the realm of payment into privacy and other arenas. At the end of October, there also will be a W3C technical plenary, to discuss identity, graph normalization, digital signatures and payments technologies.

Expect Linked Data to come up in the context of both events, Manu Sporny told attendees at this August’s 10th annual Semantic Technology & Business conference in San Jose during his keynote address, entitled Building Linked Data Into the Core of the Web. “It is the foundational data model to build all this technology off of,” said Sporny, who is the founder and CEO of Digital Bazaar, which develops technology and services to make it easier to buy and sell digital content over the Internet. (See our stories about the company and its technology here.)  He also is founder and chair of the W3C Web Payments Community Group, chair of its RDFa Working Group, and founder, and chair and lead editor of the JSON-LD Community Group.

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Deconstructing JSON-LD

Photo of (clockwise from top-left: Aaron Bradley, Greg Kellogg, Phil Archer, Stephane CorlosquetAaron Bradley recently posted a roundtable discussion about JSON-LD which includes: “JSON-LD is everywhere. Okay, perhaps not everywhere, but JSON-LD loomed large at the 2014 Semantic Web Technology and Business Conference in San Jose, where it was on many speakers’ lips, and could be seen in the code examples of many presentations. I’ve read much about the format – and have even provided a thumbnail definition of JSON-LD in these pages – but I wanted to take advantage of the conference to learn more about JSON-LD, and to better understand why this very recently-developed standard has been such a runaway hit with developers. In this quest I could not have been more fortunate than to sit down with Gregg Kellogg, one of the editors of the W3C Recommendation for JSON-LD, to learn more about the format, its promise as a developmental tool, and – particularly important to me as a search marketer – the role in the evolution of schema.org.”

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Deconstructing Google’s Knowledge Graph

Image from Google I/O showing the addition of information into Google's Knowledge Graph using JSON-LD.Barbara Starr of Search Engine Land recently observed that, “Search is changing – and it’s changing faster than ever. Increasingly, we are seeing organic elements in search results being displaced by displays coming from the Knowledge Graph. Yet the shift from search over documents (e.g. web pages) to search over data (e.g. Knowledge Graph) is still in its infancy. Remember Google’s mission statement: Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information to make it universally accessible and useful. The Knowledge Graph was built to help with that mission. It contains information about entities and their relationships to one another – meaning that Google is increasingly able to recognize a search query as a distinct entity rather than just a string of keywords. As we shift further away from keyword-based search and more towards entity-based search, internal data quality is becoming more imperative.”

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How to Build Your Own Knowledge Graph (Video – Part 1)

Photo of Jarek WilkiewiczStraight out of Google I/O this week, came some interesting announcements related to Semantic Web technologies and Linked Data. Included in the mix was a cool instructional video series about how to “Build a Small Knowledge Graph.” Part 1 was presented by Jarek Wilkiewicz, Knowledge Developer Advocate at Google (and SemTechBiz speaker).

Wilkiewicz fits a lot into the seven-and-a-half minute piece, in which he presents a (sadly) hypothetical example of an online music store that he creates with his Google colleague Shawn Simister. During the example, he demonstrates the power and ease of leveraging multiple technologies, including the schema.org vocabulary (particularly the recently announced ‘Actions‘), the JSON-LD syntax for expressing the machine readable data, and the newly launched Cayley, an open source graph database (more on this in the next post in this series).

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Building The Scientific Knowledge Graph

saimgeStandard Analytics, which was a participant at the recent TechStars event in New York City, has a big goal on its mind: To organize the world’s scientific information by building a complete scientific knowledge graph.

The company’s co-founders, Tiffany Bogich and Sebastien Ballesteros,came to the conclusion that someone had to take on the job as a result of their own experience as researchers. A problem they faced, says Bogich, was being able to access all the information behind published results, as well as search and discover across papers. “Our thesis is that if you can expose the moving parts – the data, code, media – and make science more discoverable, you can really advance and accelerate research,” she says.

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The Web Is 25 — And The Semantic Web Has Been An Important Part Of It

web25NOTE: This post was updated at 5:40pm ET.

Today the Web celebrates its 25th birthday, and we celebrate the Semantic Web’s role in that milestone. And what a milestone it is: As of this month, the Indexed Web contains at least 2.31 billion pages, according to WorldWideWebSize.  

The Semantic Web Blog reached out to the World Wide Web Consortium’s current and former semantic leads to get their perspective on the roads The Semantic Web has traveled and the value it has so far brought to the Web’s table: Phil Archer, W3C Data Activity Lead coordinating work on the Semantic Web and related technologies; Ivan Herman, who last year transitioned roles at the W3C from Semantic Activity Lead to Digital Publishing Activity Lead; and Eric Miller, co-founder and president of Zepheira and the leader of the Semantic Web Initiative at the W3C until 2007.

While The Semantic Web came to the attention of the wider public in 2001, with the publication in The Scientific American of The Semantic Web by Tim Berners-Lee, James Hendler and Ora Lassila, Archer points out that “one could argue that the Semantic Web is 25 years old,” too. He cites Berners-Lee’s March 1989 paper, Information Management: A Proposal, that includes a diagram that shows relationships that are immediately recognizable as triples. “That’s how Tim envisaged it from Day 1,” Archer says.

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“Webize” Your Data with JSON-LD

json-ld-button

Benjamin Young of Cloudant reports, “Data is often stored and distributed in esoteric formats… Even when the data is available in a parse-able format (CSV, XML, JSON, etc), there is often little provided with the data to explain what’s inside. If there is descriptive meta data provided, it’s often only meant for the next developer to read when implementing yet-another-parser for said data. Really, it’s all quite abysmal… Enter, JSON-LD! JSON-LD (JSON Linked Data) is a simple way of providing semantic meaning for the terms and values in a JSON document. Providing that meaning with the JSON means that the next developer’s application can parse and understand the JSON you gave them.” Read more

RDF 1.1 is a W3C Recommendation

RDF 1.1Almost exactly 10 years after the publication of RDF 1.0 (10 Feb 2004, http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf-concepts/), the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has announced today that RDF 1.1 has become a “Recommendation.” In fact, the RDF Working Group has published a set of eight Resource Description Framework (RDF) Recommendations and four Working Group Notes. One of those notes, the RDF 1.1 primer, is a good starting place for those new to the standard.

SemanticWeb.com caught up with Markus Lanthaler, co-editor of the RDF 1.1 Concepts and Abstract Syntax document, to discuss this news.

photo of Markus LanthalerLanthaler said of the recommendation, “Semantic Web technologies are often criticized for their complexity–mostly because RDF is being conflated with RDF/XML. Thus, with RDF 1.1 we put a strong focus on simplicity. The new specifications are much more accessible and there’s a clear separation between RDF, the data model, and its serialization formats. Furthermore, the primer provides a great introduction for newcomers. I’m convinced that, along with the standardization of Turtle (and previously JSON-LD), this will mark an important point in the history of the Semantic Web.”

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Elasticsearch 1.0 Takes Realtime Search To The Next Level

esearchpixElasticSearch 1.0 launches today, combining Elasticsearch realtime search and analytics, Logstash (which helps you take logs and other event data from your systems and store them in a central place), and Kibana (for graphing and analyzing logs) in an end-to-end stack designed to be a complete platform for data interaction. This first major update of the solution that delivers actionable insights in real-time from almost any type of structured and unstructured data source follows on the heels of the release of the commercial monitoring solution Elasticsearch Marvel, which gives users insight into the health of Elasticsearch clusters.

Organizations from Wikimedia to Netflix to Facebook today take advantage of Elasticsearch, which vp of engineering Kevin Kluge says is distinguished by its focus from its open-source start four years ago on realtime search in a distributed fashion. The native JSON and RESTful search tool “has intelligence where when it gets a new field that it hasn’t seen before, it discerns from the content of the field what type of data it is,” he explains. Users can optionally define schemas if they want, or be more freeform and very quickly add new styles of data and still profit from easier management and administration, he says.

Models also exist for using JSON-LD to represent RDF in a manner that can be indexed by Elasticsearch. The BBC World Service Archive prototype, in fact, uses an index based on ElasticSearch and constructed from the RDF data held in a central triple store to make sure its search engine and aggregation pages are quick enough.

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JSON-LD is an official Web Standard

JSON-LD logo JSON-LD has reached the status of being an official “Recommendation” of the W3C. JSON-LD provides yet another way for web developers to add structured data into web pages, joining RDFa.The W3C documentation says, “JSON is a useful data serialization and messaging format. This specification defines JSON-LD, a JSON-based format to serialize Linked Data. The syntax is designed to easily integrate into deployed systems that already use JSON, and provides a smooth upgrade path from JSON to JSON-LD. It is primarily intended to be a way to use Linked Data in Web-based programming environments, to build interoperable Web services, and to store Linked Data in JSON-based storage engines.” This addition should be welcome news for Linked Data developers familiar with JSON and/or faced with systems based on JSON.

SemanticWeb.com caught up with the JSON-LD specfication editors to get their comments…

photo of Manu Sporny Manu Sporny (Digital Bazaar), told us, “When we created JSON-LD, we wanted to make Linked Data accessible to Web developers that had not traditionally been able to keep up with the steep learning curve associated with the Semantic Web technology stack. Instead, we wanted people that were comfortable working with great solutions like JSON, MongoDB, and REST to be able to easily integrate Linked Data technologies into their day-to-day work. The adoption of JSON-LD by Google and schema.org demonstrates that we’re well on our way to achieving this goal.”

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