Posts Tagged ‘libraries’

New Opps For Libraries And Vendors Open Up In BIBFRAME Transition

semtechbiz-10th-125sqOpportunities are opening up in the library sector, both for the institutions themselves and providers whose solutions and services can expand in that direction.

These vistas will be explored in a session hosted by Kevin Ford, digital project coordinator at the Library of Congress at next week’s Semantic Technology & Business conference in San Jose. The door is being opened by the Bibliographic Framework Initiative (BIBFRAME) that the LOC launched a few years ago. Libraries will be moving from the MARC standards, their lingua franca for representing and communicating bibliographic and related information in machine-readable form, to BIBFRAME, which models bibliographic data in RDF using semantic technologies.

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LODLAM Training Day at Semantic Technology & Business Conference

LODLAM: LinkedOpen Data in Libraries, Archives, and MuseumsAmong the many exciting activities at the 10th Annual Semantic Technology & Business Conference (#SemTechBiz) is the partnership with the Linked Open Data in Libraries Archives, and Museums (LODLAM) Community. On Tuesday, August 19, 2014, LODLAM will hold a full day of trainings at the SemTechBiz Conference in San Jose, California.  Registration information is available here.

We spoke to Jon Voss, Co-Founder of the International LODLAM Summit, about the Training Day:

SemanticWeb.com: What is the LODLAM Training Day?

Photo of Jon VossJon Voss: The LODLAM Training Day is an all-day, hands-on workshop led by practitioners of Linked Open Data in libraries, archives and museums from around the world.

SW: What can people expect to learn?

JV: We’ve broken the day down into two sections, basically: publishing data and reusing data.  The first part of the day we’ll look at ways that libraries, archives and museums are putting massive amounts of structured data online for the public good, and what techniques and tools you can use to do it.  The second part of the day we’ll be looking at using this data in different ways, how to use SPARQL queries, how to build data into other mashups, how to use open datasets to improve your own data, etc.
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WorldCat Releases 197 Million Nuggets of Linked Data

worldcatRichard Wallis of OCLC reports on his Data Liberate blog, “A couple of months back I spoke about the preview release of Works data from WorldCat.org.  Today OCLC published a press release announcing the official release of 197 million descriptions of bibliographic Works. A Work is a high-level description of a resource, containing information such as author, name, descriptions, subjects etc., common to all editions of the work.  The description format is based upon some of the properties defined by the CreativeWork type from the Schema.org vocabulary.  In the case of a WorldCat Work description, it also contains [Linked Data] links to individual, OCLC numbered, editions already shared from WorldCat.org.” Read more

Why Librarians Should Embrace Linked Data

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David Stuart of Research Information recently wrote, “If libraries are to realise the value of the data they have been building and refining over many years, then it is not enough for them to just embrace the web of documents, they must also embrace the web of data. The associated technologies may seem complex and impenetrable but the idea of libraries embracing the web of data doesn’t have to mean that every librarian has to embrace every bit of technology. The web of data refers to the publication of data online in a machine-readable format, so that individual pieces of information can be both linked to and read automatically.” Read more

194 Million Linked Open Data Bibliographic Work Descriptions Released by OCLC

OCLC WorldCat logoYesterday, Richard Wallis gave a peek into some exciting new developments in the OCLC’s Linked Open Data (LOD) efforts.  While these have not yet been formally announced by OCLC, they represent significant advancements in WorldCat LOD. Our reporting to date on LOD at WorldCat is here.

Most significantly, OCLC has now released 194 Million Linked Open Data Bibliographic Work descriptions. According to Wallis, “A Work is a high-level description of a resource, containing information such as author, name, descriptions, subjects etc., common to all editions of the work.” In his post, he uses the example of “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” as a Work.

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Video: Shared Library Data at the ALA Annual 2013

Logo of the OCLCRegular readers of this blog may know that Linked Data and Semantic Web technologies are gaining significant traction in the worlds of Libraries, Archives, and Museums. Earlier this summer, Richard Wallis (Technology Evangelist) and Ted Fons (Executive Director, Data Services and WorldCat Quality) of the OCLC discussed and demonstrated how that organization in particular is sharing library data. This presentation was delivered at the Annual Conference of the American Libraries Association in Chicago.

The presentations by Fons and Wallis serve as good introductory pieces to practical Linked Data use, and the potential benefits of using Linked Data as a platform for knowledge management for large collections of data.  Wallis also discusses why OCLC chose to use schema.org as a vocabulary.

Part I:

Part II:

Libraries: Time To Take Your Place On The Web Of Data

At The Semantic Technology and Business conference in San Francisco Monday, OCLC technology evangelist Richard Wallis broke the news that Content-negotiation was implemented for the publication of Linked Data for WorldCat resources. Last June, WorldCat.org began publishing Linked Data for its bibliographic treasure trove, a global catalog of more than 290 million library records and some 2 billion holdings, leveraging schema.org to describe the assets.

“Now you can use standard Linked Data technologies to bring back information in RDF/ XML, JSON, or Turtle,” Wallis said. Or triples. “People can start playing with this today.” As he writes in his blog discussing the news, they can manually specify their preferred serialization format to work with or display, or do it from within a program by specifying to the http protocol for the format to accept from accessing the URI.

“Two hundred ninety million records on the web of Linked Data is a pretty good chunk of stuff when you start talking content negotiation,” Wallis told the Semantic Web Blog.

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Late-Breaking Program Additions for Semantic Technology & Business Conference

The Semantic Technology & Business Conference begins in a few short days. If you haven’t registered yet, it’s not too late, and if you haven’t looked at the program recently, be sure to check out some of these exciting late-breaking additions…

Photo of Jason DouglasKEYNOTE:
What Google is Doing with Structured Data
Jason Douglas, Group Product Manager, Knowledge Graph, Google

Photos of Dan Brickley, R.V. Guha, Sandro HawkeHOT TOPIC PANEL:
WebSchemas: Schema.org and Vocabulary Collaboration

Dan Brickley, Developer Advocate, Google
R.V. Guha, Google Fellow, Google
Sandro Hawke, W3C Technical Staff, W3C/MIT

(More panelists TBA)


BREAKOUT SESSIONS:

Building Your SmartData Accelerator
Robert Kruse, Managing Partner, SmartDataAccelerator
Gene Mishchenko, Lead Information Architect, Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services

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Announcing the Winner of the Semantic Web.Com “Spotlight On Library Innovation”

One sector that has been very active in the adoption of Linked Data is that of libraries. In an effort to highlight this activity, SemanticWeb.com, supported by OCLC and LITA, put out a call last month for work that promoted or demonstrated the benefits of linked data for libraries.

Photo of Kevin FordAfter receiving a number of excellent nominations, we are pleased to announce that Kevin Ford, from the Network Development and MARC Standards Office at the Library of Congress, was selected to showcase his work with the Bibliographic Framework Initiative (BIBFRAME) and his continuing work on the Library of Congress’s Linked Data Service (loc.id). In addition to being an active contributor, Kevin is responsible for the BIBFRAME website; has devised tools to view MARC records and the resulting BIBFRAME resources side-by-side; authored the first transformation code for MARC data to BIBFRAME resources; and is project manager for The Library of Congress’ Linked Data Service. Kevin also writes and presents frequently to promote BIBFRAME, ID.LOC.GOV, and educate fellow librarians on the possibilities of linked data.

Congratulations to Kevin!

If you want to learn more about BIBFRAME and the role Linked Data is playing in the world of libraries, join us at Semantic Technology & Business Conference, June 2-5 where Kevin’s colleague from the Library of Congress, Nate Trail, will deliver a lightning talk on BIBFRAME, and Richard Wallis of the OCLC will present From Record to Graph – Exposing a Legacy.

Stanford Libraries Recognize France & Spain for International Innovation

Cynthia Haven of Stanford News reports, “The first winners of the Stanford Prize for Innovation in Research Libraries are the Bibliothèque nationale de France (National Library of France) and the Miguel de Cervantes Digital Library in Spain. The Stanford Libraries’ new annual award celebrates groundbreaking programs, projects and services for research libraries anywhere in the world. Commendations of merit went to Australia’s Griffith University and the New York Public Library. About two dozen proposals competed for the modest cash prize of $5,000, underwritten by Logitech, that went to each of the winning institutions.” Read more

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