Posts Tagged ‘linked open data’

Symplectic Takes Another Step In Helping Universities Engage In Research Collaboration And Discovery

sympintThis summer, Symplectic Limited become the first DuraSpace Registered Service Provider (RSP) for the VIVO Project, an open-source, open-ontology, open-process platform for hosting semantically structured information about the interests, activities and accomplishments of scientists and scholars. (See our coverage here.) “Universities want to capture all that their researchers do, collaborate and reuse the data the research brings out,” says Sabih Ali, head of brand at Symplectic. “A lot of them are looking to be a part of something like VIVO and join the whole semantic web technology movement, but they don’t have the capacity to do it themselves.”

Symplectic brings that to the table with its role as a services provider and the expertise in data quality, organization and transfer that it has thanks to being a developer of Elements, software that captures, collects and showcases institutional research, and which is used by many leading universities including Cambridge and Oxford. It also offers an open-source VIVO harvester for clients allows the ingestion of information into VIVO profiles using the rich data that Elements captures.

More recently, Symplectic has taken on the role of authorized services provider for Profiles Research Networking Software, as well. Profiles RNS is an NIH-funded open source tool to speed the process of finding researchers with specific areas of expertise for collaboration and professional networking. It’s based on the VIVO 1.4 ontology, with support for RDF, SPARQL, and Linked Open Data.

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Getty Releases More Linked Open Data: Thesaurus of Geographic Names

Linked Open Data - Getty VocabulariesLast winter, SemanticWeb reported that the Getty Research Institute had released the first of four Getty vocabularies as Linked Open Data. Recently, the Getty revealed that it had unveiled its second. James Cuno wrote, “We’re delighted to announce that the Getty Research Institute has released the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names (TGN)® as Linked Open Data. This represents an important step in the Getty’s ongoing work to make our knowledge resources freely available to all. Following the release of the Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT)® in February, TGN is now the second of the four Getty vocabularies to be made entirely free to download, share, and modify. Both data sets are available for download at vocab.getty.edu under an Open Data Commons Attribution License (ODC BY 1.0).”

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A Look At LOD2 Project Accomplishments

lod2pixIf you’re interested in Linked Data, no doubt you’re planning to listen in on next week’s Semantic Web Blog webinar, Getting Started With The Linked Data Platform (register here), featuring Arnaud Le Hors, Linked Data Standards Lead at IBM and chair of the W3C Linked Data Platform WG and the OASIS OSLC Core TC. It also may be on your agenda to attend this month’s Semantic Web Technology & Business Conference, where speakers including Le Hors, Manu Sporny, Sandro Hawke, and others will be presenting Linked Data-focused sessions.

In the meantime, though, you might enjoy reviewing the results of the LOD2 Project, the European Commission co-funded effort whose four-year run, begun in 2010, aimed at advancing RDF data management; extracting, creating and enriching structured RDF data; interlinking data from different sources; and authoring, exploring and visualizing Linked Data. To that end, why not take a stroll through the recently released Linked Open Data – Creating Knowledge Out of Interlinked Data, edited by LOD2 Project participants Soren Auer of the Institut für Informatik III Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität; Volha Bryl of the University of Mannheim, and Sebastian Tramp of the University of Leipzig?

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Easing The Way To Linked Open Data In The Geosciences Domain

ocenapixThe OceanLink Project is bringing semantic technology to the geosciences domain – and it’s doing it with the idea in mind of not forcing that community to have to become experts in semtech in order to realize value from its implementation. Project lead Tom Narock of Marymount University, who recently participated in an online webinar that discussed how semantics is being implemented to integrate ocean science data repositories, library holdings, conference abstracts, and funded research awards, noted that this effort is “tackling a particular problem in ocean sciences, but [can be part of a] more general change for researchers in discovering and integrating interdisciplinary resources, [when you] need to do federated and complex searches of available resources.”

The project has an interest in using more formal, stronger semantics – working with OWL, RDF, reasoners – but also an acknowledgement that a steeper learning curve comes with the territory. How to balance that with what the community is able to implement and use? The answer: “In addition to exposing our data using semantic technologies, a big part of Oceanlink is building cyber infrastructure that will help lessen the burden on our end users.”

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The Importance of the Semantic Web To Our Cultural Heritage

oldmasterpaintingEarlier this year The Semantic Web Blog reported that the Getty Research Institute has released the Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) as Linked Open Data. One of the external advisors to its work was Vladimir Alexiev, who leads the Data and Ontology Management group at Ontotext and works on many projects related to cultural heritage.

Ontotext’s OWLIM family of semantic repositories supports large-scale knowledge bases of rich semantic information, and powerful reasoning. The company, for example, did the first working implementation of CIDOC CRM search; CIDOC CRM is one of these rich ontologies for cultural heritage.

We caught up with Alexiev recently to gain some insight into semantic technology’s role in representing the cultural heritage sphere. Here are some of his thoughts about why it’s important for cultural institutions to adopt Linked Open Data and semantic technologies to enhance our digital understanding of cultural heritage objects and information:

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Studio Ousia Envisions A World Of Semantic Augmented Reality

Image courtesy: Flickr/by Filter Forge

Image courtesy: Flickr/by Filter Forge

Ikuya Yamada, co-founder and CTO of Studio Ousia, the company behind Linkify – the technology to automatically extract certain keywords and add intelligent hyperlinks to them to accelerate mobile search – recently sat down with The Semantic Web Blog to discuss the company’s work, including its vision of Semantic AR (augmented reality).

The Semantic Web Blog: You spoke at last year’s SEEDS Conference on the subject of linking things and information and the vision of Semantic AR, which includes the idea of delivering additional information to users before they even launch a search for it. Explain your technology’s relation to that vision of finding and delivering the information users need while they are consuming content – even just looking at a word.

Yamada: The main focus of our technology is extracting accurately only a small amount of interesting keywords from text [around people, places, or things]. …We also develop a content matching system that matches those keywords with other content on the web – like a singer [keyword] with a song or a location [keyword] with a map. By combining keyword extraction and the content matching engine, we can augment text using information on the web.

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194 Million Linked Open Data Bibliographic Work Descriptions Released by OCLC

OCLC WorldCat logoYesterday, Richard Wallis gave a peek into some exciting new developments in the OCLC’s Linked Open Data (LOD) efforts.  While these have not yet been formally announced by OCLC, they represent significant advancements in WorldCat LOD. Our reporting to date on LOD at WorldCat is here.

Most significantly, OCLC has now released 194 Million Linked Open Data Bibliographic Work descriptions. According to Wallis, “A Work is a high-level description of a resource, containing information such as author, name, descriptions, subjects etc., common to all editions of the work.” In his post, he uses the example of “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” as a Work.

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First of Four Getty Vocabularies Made Available as Linked Open Data

Getty Vocabularies - Linked Open Data logoJim Cuno, the President and CEO of the Getty, announced yesterday that the Getty Research Institute has released the Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) ® as Linked Open Data. Cuno said, “The Art & Architecture Thesaurus is a reference of over 250,000 terms on art and architectural history, styles, and techniques. It’s one of the Getty Research Institute’s four Getty Vocabularies, a collection of databases that serves as the premier resource for cultural heritage terms, artists’ names, and geographical information, reflecting over 30 years of collaborative scholarship.”

The data set is available for download at vocab.getty.edu under an Open Data Commons Attribution License (ODC BY 1.0). Vocab.getty.edu offers a SPARQL endpoint, as well as links to the Getty’s Semantic Representation documentation, the Getty Ontology, links for downloading the full data sets, and more.

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Ivan Herman Discusses Lead Role At W3C Digital Publishing Activity — And Where The Semantic Web Can Fit In Its Work

rsz_w3clogoThere’s a (fairly) new World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) activity, the Digital Publishing Activity, and it’s headed up by Ivan Herman, formerly the Semantic Web Activity Lead there. That activity was subsumed in December by the W3c Data Activity, with Phil Archer taking the role as Lead (see our story here).

Begun last summer, the Digital Publishing Activity has, as Herman describes it, “millions of aspects, some that have nothing to do with the semantic web.” But some, happily, that do – and that are extremely important to the publishing community, as well.

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Dandelion’s New Bloom: A Family Of Semantic Text Analysis APIs

rsz_dandyDandelion, the service from SpazioDati whose goal is to delivering linked and enriched data for apps, has just recently introduced a new suite of products related to semantic text analysis.

Its dataTXT family of semantic text analysis APIs includes dataTXT-NEX, a named entity recognition API that links entities in the input sentence with Wikipedia and DBpedia and, in turn, with the Linked Open Data cloud and dataTXT-SIM, an experimental semantic similarity API that computes the semantic distance between two short sentences. TXT-CL (now in beta) is a categorization service that classifies short sentences into user-defined categories, says SpazioDati.CEO Michele Barbera.

“The advantage of the dataTXT family compared to existing text analysis’ tools is that dataTXT relies neither on machine learning nor NLP techniques,” says Barbera. “Rather it relies entirely on the topology of our underlying knowledge graph to analyze the text.” Dandelion’s knowledge graph merges together several Open Community Data sources (such as DBpedia) and private data collected and curated by SpazioDati. It’s still in private beta and not yet publicly accessible, though plans are to gradually open up portions of the graph in the future via the service’s upcoming Datagem APIs, “so that developers will be able to access the same underlying structured data by linking their own content with dataTXT APIs or by directly querying the graph with the Datagem APIs; both of them will return the same resource identifiers,” Barbera says. (See the Semantic Web Blog’s initial coverage of Dandelion here, including additional discussion of its knowledge graph.)

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