Posts Tagged ‘LinkedIn’

Newsle Joins LinkedIn

newsle

Jonah Varon and Axel Hansen’s semantic news app Newsle has become part of LinkedIn, and so have Varon and Hansen (plus their engineering team.) According to Newsle, “We founded Newsle with a simple goal: to deliver important news about the people who matter to you. Three years and 2 million users later, we’re happy to say that we’re well on the way toward realizing that goal. LinkedIn is equally passionate about offering insights that can help professionals better do their jobs and will help us accelerate our efforts by making Newsle available to its members. We’re delighted that our team of engineers — Liz, Farid, Shane, and Nick — will be making the move with us to LinkedIn. We’ll keep Newsle online as a standalone service as we combine all the functionality  with LinkedIn’s core services.” Read more

The Supply Chain Is One Big Graph In Start-up Elementum’s Platform

rsz_elementum_transport_appStartup Elementum wants to take supply chains into the 21st century. Incubated at Flextronics, the second largest contract manufacturer in the world, and launching today with $44 million in Series B funding from that company and Lightspeed Ventures, its approach is to get supply chain participants – the OEMs that generate product ideas and designs, the contract manufacturers who build to those specs, the component makers who supply the ingredients to make the product, the various logistics hubs to move finished product to market, and the retail customer – to drop the one-off relational database integrations and instead see the supply chain fundamentally as a complex graph or web of connections.

“It’s no different thematically from how Facebook thinks of its social network or how LinkedIn thinks of what it calls the economic graph,” says Tyler Ziemann, head of growth at Elementum. Built on Amazon Web Services, Elementum’s “mobile-first” apps for real-time visibility, shipment tracking and carrier management, risk monitoring and mitigation, and order collaboration have a back-end built to consume and make sense of both structured and unstructured data on-the-fly, based on a real-time Java, MongoDB NoSQL document database to scale in a simple and less expensive way across a global supply chain that fundamentally involves many trillions of records, and flexible schema graph database to store and map the nodes and edges of the supply chain graph.

“Relational database systems can’t scale to support the types of data volumes we need and the flexibility that is required for modeling the supply chain as a graph,” Ziemann says.

Read more

LinkedIn: The Road To The First Global Economic Graph

We’ve all heard the term Knowledge Graph. Now, a new study has been released from faberNovel that puts the spotlight on LinkedIn and how it is “silently drawing what might be the first global economic graph.”

faberNovel’s LinkedIn, The Serious Network (June 2013) features the quote by LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner of the platform’s ambitions to develop the world’s first economic graph: “We want to digitally map the global economy, identifying the connections between people, jobs, skills, companies and professional knowledge – and spot in real time the trends pointing to economic opportunities.”

It’s already gone far in this direction. How? As Daniel Tunkelang, who now leads LinkedIn’s efforts around query understanding, last year explained at SemTechBiz West, “the sweet spot is in the semi-structured [data] space.”

Read more

Blackberry 10 Debuts, Smart Touch-Screen Keyboard Is Onboard, As Is New Employee Alicia Keys

Blackberry president and CEO Thorsten Heins with new global creative director Alicia Keys.

The new and long-awaited Blackberry 10 line from Research In Motion (RIM) makes its debut today. The company that once defined the smart phone market has a lot riding on it, and it remains to be seen if the new models debuting today will revive its fortunes. It’s already revived its name: Thorsten Heins, President and CEO, revealed at the launch today that “from this day forward, RIM becomes Blackberry.”

The two models that kick off its re-engineered approach to mobile computing are the Blackberry Q10 with a hybrid touch-screen/keyboard and the Z10 with a full touch-screen and onscreen keyboard, powered by the Blackberry 10 platform. Of the Q10, Heins said, “We built this for all those people who told us, ‘we just have to have a physical keyboard typing experience’.” Given Blackberry users’ well-known attachment to traditional keyboards, getting the onscreen keyboard right is going to be a big concern for tried-and-true Blackberry users.

As on the Blackberry Playbook before it, SwiftKey – the best-selling Android app of 2012— is reportedly behind the virtual keyboard technology on the new models. Though that vendor wasn’t named in the launch presentation during the demo of the touch-screen keyboard capabilities, the features Blackberry demonstrated pointed to the company’s leveraging the cross-platform SwiftKey software development kit for at least some of the new devices’ capabilities.

And what’s behind SwiftKey is natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning technology to speed up touch-screen typing.

Read more

Singly “App Fabric” Platform Helps Developers Deeply Connect To Other Apps So Users Can Connect With All Their Data

Singly, which has as its mission connecting people more closely with their data everywhere it lives, now is opening up the beta of its development platform to help developers create the apps that can make that happen.

As co-founder and CEO Jason Cavnar describes Singly’s work, “it is an app fabric product” that gives developers a way to build applications without having to worry about making all the different connection points into the other applications they want their products to talk to. “That’s handled as a service for them. Like Amazon Web Services is for the infrastructure layer, we would like to be a trusted partner in the data layer,” he says.

“It’s really about a person’s life and experiences – sharing that wherever it is in other applications into a new one and that new one generating things to share back out,” says fellow co-founder and CTO Jeremie Miller, who invented Jabber/XMPP technologies and was the primary developer of jabberd 1.0, the first XMPP server. APIs are prominent in Singly’s approach to unlocking that data, but Miller sees some parallels between its own mission and that of the semantic web – a concept whose potential he’s always been excited about, he says, but which he doesn’t think has caught on as he’d hoped.

Read more

Wolfram|Alpha Dives Into Facebook Analytics

Heading into the Labor Day weekend, Wolfram|Alpha released a new feature that lets users perform personal analytics with Facebook data, for free. Users can head here and type in “Facebook Report” for an analysis of their Facebook data.

Stephen Wolfram, the creator of the computational knowledge engine, alerted the world to the news in this blog post. “When you type “facebook report,” Wolfram|Alpha generates a pretty seriously long report—almost a small book about you, with more than a dozen major chapters, broken into more than 60 sections, with all sorts of drill-downs, alternate views, etc.,” he writes.

Read more

Scale, Structure, and Semantics at SemTechBiz

Daniel Tunkelang, principal data scientist at LinkedIn has shared the slides from his SemTechBiz SF presentation: Scale, Structure, and Semantics. He prefaces the presentation, “[Friday] morning I had the pleasure to present a keynote address at the Semantic Technology & Business Conference (SemTechBiz). I’ve had a long and warm relationship with the semantic technology community — especially with Marco Neumann and the New York Semantic Web Meetup. But I’m not exactly a fanboy of the semantic web, and I wasn’t sure how the audience would respond to some of my more provocative assertions. Fortunately the reception was very positive. Several people approached me afterwards to thank me for presenting a balanced argument for combining big data with structured representations and for raising HCIR issues.” Read more

Daniel Tunkelang talks about LinkedIn’s data graph

Daniel Tunkelang, Principal Data Scientist at LinkedIn, delivered the final keynote at SemTechBiz in San Francisco this morning, exploring the way in which “semantics emerge when we apply the right analytical techniques to a sufficient quality and quantity of data.”

Daniel began by offering his key takeaways for the presentation;

  • Communication trumps knowledge representation.
  • Communication is the problem and the solution. Read more

The Semantic Link with Guest, Daniel Tunkelang – April, 2012

Paul Miller, Bernadette Hyland, Ivan Herman, Eric Hoffer, Andraz Tori, Peter Brown, Christine Connors, Eric Franzon

On Friday, April 13, a group of Semantic thought leaders from around the globe met with their host and colleague, Paul Miller, for the latest installment of the Semantic Link, a monthly podcast covering the world of Semantic Technologies. This episode includes a discussion about various approaches to building semantic systems, and “the Linkers” were joined by special guest, Daniel Tunkelang, Principal Data Scientist, LinkedIn. Daniel — who will deliver a keynote address at the June Semantic Technology & Business Conference — shared insights gained over many years working at LinkedIn, Endeca, and Google, and IBM among others.
Read more

What is a Data Scientist?

In a recent interview Daniel Tunkelang, the principal data scientist at LinkedIn shared his thoughts on what a data scientist is. Tunkelang said, “I’m a big fan of Hilary Mason, chief scientist at bit.ly, so I’ll cite her definition: a data scientist is someone who can obtain, scrub, explore, model and interpret data, blending hacking, statistics and machine learning. Data scientists not only are adept at working with data, but appreciate data itself as a first-class product. At LinkedIn, products pioneered by data scientists, such as People You May Know, harness the power of data to create value for users.” Read more

NEXT PAGE >>