Posts Tagged ‘MIT’

Twitter Invests $10M to Better Understand Online Interactions

TwitterAnu Passary of Tech Times reports, “Microblogging site Twitter is gearing up to partner with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on a new project, which hopes to gain a better understanding of online interactions. Twitter is investing $10 million for the development of the Laboratory for Social Machines (LSM) over a five-year period. The new MIT Lab will produce a new social networking platform, analytic tools and also mobile apps that will connect individuals better. The LSM will be able to access Twitter’s live streams of tweets and the site’s public archives right from the time Twitter began. The project will focus on the creation of novel technology that can understand ‘semantic and social patterns’.” Read more

New Activity Recognition Algorithm Can Figure Out What’s Happening in a Video

13564816965_19f9c9286e

Larry Hardesty of MIT News Office reports, “With the commodification of digital cameras, digital video has become so easy to produce that human beings can have trouble keeping up with it. Among the tools that computer scientists are developing to make the profusion of video more useful are algorithms for activity recognition — or determining what the people on camera are doing when. At the Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition in June, Hamed Pirsiavash, a postdoc at MIT, and his former thesis advisor, Deva Ramanan of the University of California at Irvine, will present a new activity-recognition algorithm that has several advantages over its predecessors.” Read more

MIT, UW Researchers Develop System that Can Solve Word Problems

mit

Alexander Saltarin of Tech Times reports, “Computer science researchers have developed a new computer system that has the capability of solving word problems automatically. The new system was developed by researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) with the help of other researchers from the University of Washington. Most of the research to develop the new system was conducted at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in the MIT. Linguistic problems have always been a tricky subject for computer scientists. Unlike math, which is considered by many experts as a pure and accurate ‘language,’ computers often have difficulties in understanding the sometimes vague and confusing languages that humans use on a daily basis. However, the new computer system can actually be used to solve word problems often seen in basic math lessons at schools.” Read more

Semantic Technology Jobs: MIT

MIT

MIT is looking for a Research Software Engineer, NLP in Cambridge, MA. The post states, “The lab will develop technologies and methods to enable new modes of social engagement in news, politics, and government.  Will help the lab build a high performance data pipeline designed to ingest and analyze large-scale streams of heterogeneous media data. Responsibilities include creating language models from petabytes of text data using Hadoop, working closely with researchers to implement algorithms that power research experiments, and measuring and continually optimizing performance of NLP (neuro-linguistic programming) algorithms.  Will report to Professor Deb Roy.” Read more

IBM Teams with Top Universities to Research Cognitive Systems

ibm

R&D Magazine reports that “IBM has announced a collaborative research initiative with four leading universities to advance the development and deployment of cognitive computing systems—systems like IBM Watson that can learn, reason and help human experts make complex decisions involving extraordinary volumes of fast-moving data. Faculty at the four schools—Carnegie Mellon University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, New York University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute—will study enabling technologies and methods for building a new class of systems that better enable people to interact with Big Data in what IBM has identified as a new era of computing.” Read more

Building a Disaster-Relief App Quickly with RDF

MIT

Larry Hardesty of RD Mag reports, “Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and the Qatar Computing Research Institute have developed new tools that allow people with minimal programming skill to rapidly build cellphone applications that can help with disaster relief. The tools are an extension of the App Inventor, open-source software that enables nonprogrammers to create applications for devices running Google’s Android operating system by snapping together color-coded graphical components. Based on decades of MIT research, the App Inventor was initially a Google product, but it was later rereleased as open-source software managed by MIT.” Read more

Why Your Business Needs To Get Going With Linked Data

Semantic Technology & Business Conference - NYC, October 2-3, 2013Any data-driven industry – and these days, that’s almost all of them – knows the challenges around bringing together data from many systems and from across many years to make use of it. There’s too much focus on making copies and transforming information, rather than getting value out of it.

It doesn’t have to be that way. Broad benefits await when an organization looks to how subscribing to the Linked Data model changes the game, offering a far more mature and sustainable approach to working with data than typical platform upgrades or conversion projects.

At the upcoming Semantic Technology & Business Conference in New York City in October, K. Krasnow Waterman will deliver the opening keynote focused on how and why Linked Data is a value to businesses in so many respects, including driving revenues and easing risk management and compliance requirements. “If you take that first step and make [Linked Data] your project, the value associated with it is so much greater than the next platform upgrade, because it unleashes all this opportunity to do things with data that you haven’t been able to do before,” says Krasnow Waterman, a visiting fellow at MIT whose work includes having created Linked Data Product Lab and Linked Data Ventures program, a web technology and entrepreneurship course, and CEO of LawTechIntersect, which offers data/technology management and policy consulting for private companies and government agencies.

At hand is the opportunity to manipulate your data across multiple data sources and have it lead to other data. “A great feature of Linked Data is the ability of data to reference other data,” says Krasnow Waterman. “So as you are tagging it and as people are supplementing it, that takes on an assistive capability that you simply don’t get from any other structured data that I know.”

Read more

AI System with the Common Sense of a Four Year Old

Pete Swabey of Information Age reports, “Computers, as we have all experienced, can seem highly intelligent and infuriatingly ignorant at the same time. One reason is that they lack even the most straightforward understanding of the way the world works. In artificial intelligence, this understanding is referred to as ‘common sense’. It has been described as ‘common knowledge about the world that is possessed by every schoolchild and the methods for making obvious inferences from this knowledge’. There are number of AI systems that seek to advance the common sense of computers. Perhaps the most famous is IBM’s Watson, a question answering system that learns facts and relationships about the world from encyclopaedias and the Internet.” Read more

Universities Put Cash Towards Helping HomeGrown Tech Startups Along

Image Photo Courtesy Flickr/401(K) 2012

Universities play an important role in advancing the technology ecosystem, semantic technology included. Look for starters at work done at The Tetherless World Constellation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Wright State University’s Kno.e.sis Ohio Center of Excellence in Knowledge-enabled Computing, MIT, and the Digital Enterprise Research Institute located at the National University of Ireland, Galway.

In addition to driving technology ever forward, institutions like these and others also provide a home for incubating good ideas that could become good businesses. Music discovery service Seevl and the enterprise-focused SindiceTech are two examples of semantic spin-outs from DERI, for instance, while MIT Media Lab gave birth to commercial properties with semantic underpinnings including music intelligence platform The Echo Nest. The Kno.e.sis Center points work it’s doing in the commercial direction, too: Its LinkedIn profile description notes that its “work is predominantly multidisciplinary, and multi-institutional, often involving industry collaborations and significant systems developing, with an eye towards real-world impact, technology licensing, and commercialization.”

Given the projects with commercial prospects underway within their own houses, it would seem there’s opportunity for universities themselves to look for even more ways to contribute to that success. And that’s just what the University of Minnesota is doing: This week it said that it’s launching a $20 million seed fund over a ten-year timeframe to support the innovative ideas to which its campus plays host.

Read more

Nara Neural Networking Dining Personalization Service Goes Mobile, Adds Cities, And Targets New Categories With Partners

Early in the summer, The Semantic Web Blog introduced readers to Nara, an advanced neural networking service to automate, personalize and curate web dining experiences for users. (See that story here.)

The service is moving ahead with the launch today of its mobile version, as well as in other respects. “We’re now doing a full-on consumer launch of a polished product on both the web and mobile [platforms],” says CTO Nathan Wilson. “People really are clamoring for the mobile component, especially for this [dining] use case.” Versions for both the iPhone’s iOS and Android operating systems are available.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>