Posts Tagged ‘mobile’

The Supply Chain Is One Big Graph In Start-up Elementum’s Platform

rsz_elementum_transport_appStartup Elementum wants to take supply chains into the 21st century. Incubated at Flextronics, the second largest contract manufacturer in the world, and launching today with $44 million in Series B funding from that company and Lightspeed Ventures, its approach is to get supply chain participants – the OEMs that generate product ideas and designs, the contract manufacturers who build to those specs, the component makers who supply the ingredients to make the product, the various logistics hubs to move finished product to market, and the retail customer – to drop the one-off relational database integrations and instead see the supply chain fundamentally as a complex graph or web of connections.

“It’s no different thematically from how Facebook thinks of its social network or how LinkedIn thinks of what it calls the economic graph,” says Tyler Ziemann, head of growth at Elementum. Built on Amazon Web Services, Elementum’s “mobile-first” apps for real-time visibility, shipment tracking and carrier management, risk monitoring and mitigation, and order collaboration have a back-end built to consume and make sense of both structured and unstructured data on-the-fly, based on a real-time Java, MongoDB NoSQL document database to scale in a simple and less expensive way across a global supply chain that fundamentally involves many trillions of records, and flexible schema graph database to store and map the nodes and edges of the supply chain graph.

“Relational database systems can’t scale to support the types of data volumes we need and the flexibility that is required for modeling the supply chain as a graph,” Ziemann says.

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What’s Real In Personalized Mobile Healthcare

rsz_rxNews came this week that a man accused of defrauding a financial group out of close to a million dollars around an investment in a fictional mobile medical device tablet is scheduled to sign a plea agreement admitting that he committed mail fraud. The man, Howard Leventhal, had been promoting the Star Trek-influenced McCoy Home Health Care Tablet as a device that can instantaneously deliver detailed patient information to medical providers. (The product is discussed on the company’s still-surviving web site here.) He was arrested for the fraud in October and has been out on bail.

The interesting thing about this case is that the fake he was perpetrating isn’t very far removed from reality regarding the role mobile apps and systems will play in healthcare. There of course are plenty of mobile apps already available that help users do everything from monitoring their hearts to recording their blood-oxygen level during the night to see whether they have sleep apnea. Research and Markets, for example, says the wireless health market currently will grow to nearly $60 billion by 2018, up from $23.8 billion, with remote patient monitoring applications and diagnostics helping to drive the growth. But where things really get interesting is when mobile health takes on questions of semantic interoperability of accumulated data, and assessing its meaning.

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Semantic Technology Drives Agile Business (White Paper)

Cognizant White Paper coverWe are pleased to publish a new white paper for free download, “How Semantic Technology Drives Agile Business,” from Thomas Kelly, a Director in Cognizant’s Enterprise Information Management practice.

Kelly’s experience and pragmatic approach to Enterprise Data Management shows through in this paper.  As Kelly posits in the introduction, “To achieve sustainable competitive advantage and facilitate operational agility, organizations must speed the time to business value of newly acquired data assets from months to weeks or days. Semantic technology provides the architectural foundation for getting there.”

Kelly addresses how the pace of business today is increasing while becoming more complex with considerations like big data and mobile. He points out that traditional Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence approaches simply cannot keep up with that pace. The solution he points to is Semantic Technologies, and he covers how they improve on both DW and BI while delivering “Smart Data” integration and analytics.

Download a free copy of the full white paper by filling out the form below:

About the Author

Photo of Thomas KellyThomas Kelly is a Director in Cognizant’s Enterprise Information Management (EIM) Practice and heads its Semantic Technology Center of Excellence, a technology specialty of Cognizant Business Consulting. He has 20 plus years of technology consulting experience in leading data warehousing, business intelligence, and big data projects, focused primarily on the life sciences and healthcare industries.

 

Microsoft, Nokia, and What this Means for Yahoo!

Photo of David AmerlandDavid Amerland, author of Google Semantic Search and speaker at the upcoming Semantic Technology & Business Conference in New York, has given his take on Microsoft’s acquisition of Nokia’s Devices & Services division. In his analysis, he talks about the Semantic Web and how the company that stands to lose the most in this deal is neither Microsoft nor Nokia, but Yahoo!

Amerland posits, “In the semantic web there are specific vectors driving growth that revolve around relevance and the end-user experience. In order to guarantee both you need a means to constantly acquire quality data and control the environment. Apple gets this to the extent that it locks out virtually all third-party providers from its iPhones and iOs, Facebook got it which is why it launched its own app designed to help it take over users’ phones and Google gets it having recently launched Moto X, in addition to the Android environment being present in many third-party phones.”

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Taking Semantic Tech To The Enterprise Mobile E-Learning Crowd

Recently launched in the Apple store for iPad tablets is a free version of Epsilon, a semantically-enriched mobile e-learning app from SemantiStar, the company that was previously involved in the development of the iPad news reader app StreamGlider. (See our coverage of that product here). Epsilon, as SemantiStar CEO Bill McDaniel puts it, provides an example of the company’s primary goal, which is to put semantic technology into traditional enterprise applications.

Building on research SemantiStar was involved in with DERI a few years back about what semantic pieces of technology would make e-learning better, the Epsilon mobile app is positioning itself to be the delivery vehicle for enterprises’ courseware, regardless of what their learning management system or repository may be. It has core support for Moodle format courses, but Epsilon can be attached to any LMS as long as there is an open API. The free, downloadable version is the entryway to the subscription-based enterprise version available directly from the company.

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Now You Can Talk To Your TV — And Get A Response

Seen anything good on TV lately? If the answer is ‘No,’ then maybe the problem is that you and your TV just aren’t communicating as well as you could be. The same may be said of your experience across other viewing mediums, like smartphones, tablets and PCs.

Veveo wants to change the picture, so to speak. “We want the TV to be as friendly as possible so you and the TV can have a really productive relationship,” says CMO Sam Vasisht. The company, which earlier this month exhibited its Conversational Interface Technology at TV Connect 2013 in London, says there’s a need for a universal interface based on natural language capability, so that people more intuitively can grasp what is available from where in a world of fragmented content sources, including how to better search for that content and manage their viewing experiences with greater speed and ease.

“Voice is probably the most natural way for us to deliver this experience,” says Vasisht. Veveo wants to be the platform that enables service providers and OEMs and video programmers to give their audiences the power of speech. Read more

Zemanta Debuts Content Discovery Network

Zemanta, a semantic service that extracts entities within the text of a publisher’s content and suggests related media, links and tags to add to a work as it’s being written, has launched a content discovery network to complement its suggested recommendations for which authors create original content.

The focus here is on providing editorial control. Publishers can feature content recommendations from their site, other web sites (Zemanta has 300,000 publishers in its network), and advertisers, taking advantage of the option to let Zemanta’s semantic algorithms automatically make those selections for them or to take the manual content selection route. Another option is to blacklist sites that they don’t consider appropriate content sources.

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Text and Sentiment Analytics Team In Servicing The Customer Experience

Did you ever take a survey and wonder if anyone actually was paying attention to your input? Here’s a tip: If it’s more than 20 questions, ignore it, advises Sam Keninger, director of product marketing at customer experience vendor Medallia.

“That’s the old market research way of doing things, and [the resulting big report compiled by market researchers] ends up in a binder on someone’s desk and no one will read it,” he says. A shorter survey – about a page long, and generally with a question about whether you’d recommend the product or service – signifies that attention will be paid.

Why? “The survey is an extension of the customer experience itself, so the shorter it can be the better,” Keninger says. And surveys can be shorter – and more effective at telling the company what it needs to know in real-time – when they can depend more on free-form text responses. They can do that when they can leverage both text and sentiment analytic engines to understand which topics are trending and to identify emerging issues, and ideally route those in real time to the front-lines where workers understand and can take action to fix the underlying problems.

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Making Captured Data Meaningful In the Age of Mobile, Participatory Health

There’s a new term in town: Participatory mHealth. As defined by Deborah Estrin, Professor of Computer Science at CornellNYC Tech and co-founder of Open mHealth, it “is taking what was previously unmeasured and uncaptured behavior – [things] that were previously ephemeral — and turn that into data.” Such information can be as valuable to treating conditions as is data collected by the instruments and diagnostics tools in formal health care settings, and perhaps can be a more reliable indicator of how a person’s health really is faring than their response to a doctor’s question at exam time. Those answers, after all, can be influenced by so many things – how they’re feeling that morning, for instance, vs. how they’ve generally felt since the last time they spoke to their healthcare provider.

With so many people today in possession of a smart phone with built-in GPS capabilities, there’s a new opportunity to capture so much data about what individuals do – especially those with chronic conditions – as well as the distance parameters related to where they’re doing it, the times they set out for an activity, how they’re feeling at various times during the day, and a whole lot more. “Chronic disease in some ways is the killer app for this kind of mobile health technology,” Estrin noted, since most of the care for dealing with chronic conditions occurs outside the clinical setting.

The capture is the easy part, says Estrin – much of it can be automated or be entered via a simple click, for instance. “The heavy lifting is in the analysis, in fusing and pulling out what is interesting from those data streams,” Estrin told an audience at the Semantic Technology & Business Conference in New York City on Wednesday.

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OpenMenu Serves Up Structured Data Standards For the Restaurant Industry

What’s on the markup menu for the restaurant industry?

Among the schema.org tags for marking up web pages is one for restaurants, which includes item properties for priceRange, servesCuisine, place, and menu, among others. Restaurants that use the markup language to structure their data are promised search engine optimization (SEO) benefits when hungry consumers want to see what’s on the menu at moderately-priced nearby Italian eateries, for example. They might also or alternately use the GoodRelations ontology for e-commerce to better accommodate search engines, as well as mobile and desktop apps, with service details of hours, payment options, and daily menus that are accessible in up to 50 languages.

OpenMenu has a value proposition around structured data for restaurant owners, too: Providing increased exposure to Internet, mobile and web apps, via what it aims to be a global and open standard for storing, sharing and using their menus over the Internet. The technical details are described at its OpenMenu.org site. Initially launched in 2010, it recently updated the format to Version 1.6 and currently counts about 75,000 menus as part of its landscape – 5,000 of them actively maintained and growing at a couple of thousand a week, according to CEO and founder Chris Hanscom.

Third-party developers can harness the data too, to build applications that interact with menus, like OpenMenu Search, a way for a search engine to drill down through a restaurant’s information to the menu and menu items.

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