Posts Tagged ‘music discovery’

Echo Nest Chooses Your Playlist, and Knows Who You’ll Vote For

echo nest

Tom Vanderbilt of Wired recently wrote, “The Echo Nest helps music services from Spotify to Rdio and Rhapsody suggest tunes you’ll like. But your playlists also teach its algorithms what movies you’ll watch — and even how you’ll vote… The Echo Nest claims it reaches around 100 million listeners per month, by powering music discovery services such as Spotify, Rdio, Rhapsody and VEVO, and delivering musical connections where none may have existed before… Staring at the sprawling projection up on the wall, which resembles Mark Lombardi’s unsettlingly internecine drawings of political conspiracies, one finds Polish reggae wedged roughly between Romanian pop and K-hop (or Korean hip-hop), closer in musical space to Chicago soul than it is to Finnish hip-hop.” Read more

Music Discovery Service seevl.fm Launches

screen shot of seevl.fm search: Lou ReedThis week marked the public launch of seevl.fm.

SemanticWeb.com has tracked seevl’s development through various incarnations, including a YouTube plugin and as a service for users of Deezer (available as a Deezer app). This week’s development, however, sees the service emerge as a stand-alone, cross-browser, cross-platform, mobile-ready service; a service that is free and allows for unlimited search and discovery. So, what can one do with seevl?

Following the death of Lou Reed this week, I (not surprisingly) saw mentions of the artist skyrocket across my social networks. People were sharing memories and seeking information — album and song titles, lyrics, biographies, who influenced Reed, who Reed influenced, and a lot of people simply wanted to listen to Reed’s music.  A quick look at the seevl.fm listing for Lou Reed shows a wealth of information including a music player pre-populated with some of the artist’s greatest hits.

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Decibel Makes Sweet Music With Neo4j Graph Database

At Decibel, provider of metadata-driven music discovery APIs, Neo4j has a featured role in a learning project that is the start of a plan to replace the relational database of 5 million tracks from 1.1 million albums by 300,000 artists – and the world of connections around that data – with a NoSQL graph database. With Decibel’s APIs, customers like the Blue Note Records jazz label, in partnership with developer Groovebug, have turned their record collections into a virtual record store, including track listings, individual track participations, recording session venues and dates.

With the APIs that tap into Decibel and fold into their own programs, developers at record labels, MP3 services and other digital music/entertainment or other venues can connect everything from the debut date of the bootleg Thin Lizzy album, Remembering Part 1, to its number of tracks on it to Sade’s 2011 coverage of Still in Love With You, to accommodate music-lovers’ search and discovery experiences. Or they’ll be able to surface that a piece of classical music in German is the same as another piece referenced by its French name, or that a musician that has gone by three different names in his career is one and the same.

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Music To Your Ears: Seevl Takes First Step To Become Cross-Platform Music Discovery Service

Seevl, the free music discovery service that leverages semantic technology to help users conduct searches across a world of facts-in-combination to find new musical experiences and artist information, has launched an app for Deezer that will formally go live Monday.  (See our in-depth look at Seevl here, and a screencast of how the service works here.) Deezer is a music streaming service available in more than 150 countries – not the U.S. yet, though – that claims more than 20 million users.

Seevl, which late last year updated its YouTube plug-in with more music discovery features and better integration with the YouTube user interface, models its data in RDF. In a blog post earlier this year, founder and CEO Alexandre Passant explained how the Seevl service uses Redis for simple key-value queries and SPARQL for some more complex operations, like recommendations or social network analysis, as well as provenance. As for the new Deezer app, it provides the same features as the YouTube app for easily navigating and discovering music among millions of tracks, Passant tells the Semantic Web Blog.

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Seevl Accepted to Dogpatch Labs Incubation Centre

Conor Harrington of Galway Independent reports, “A spin-out company from NUI Galway’s Digital Enterprise Research Institute (DERI) has been accepted into the prestigious incubation centre, Dogpatch Labs, which has its European headquarters in Dublin. Seevl, is a music discovery tool which contextualises users’ music listening experience online and then allows them to discover new music, and is designed to benefit both those who listen to and who create music. It was founded two years ago by two researchers at DERI, Dr Alexandre Passant and Julie Letierce, taking on a third employee last year.” Read more

Seevl – Part I: What Spotify is Missing

Vinyl“Hello my name is Eric and I am addicted to music.” Needless to say, I was thrilled when I received one of the early invitations to join Spotify (http://Spotify.com) when it launched recently in the US (if you’re not familiar with Spotify, here’s a good introduction). The service offers a catalog of +15,000,000 tracks, and the audio quality has been consistently excellent.

However, there is one area where I find Spotify severely lacking – discovery.  Fortunately, I work in the Semantic Web world, and I recently had the opportunity to play around with Seevl.net, a music discovery service that leverages semantic technology.  It’s impressive, and I often find myself using Seevl.net to augment Spotify.

So what is Seevl?
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seevl ‘Reinvents Music Discovery’

Alexandre Passant of DERI Galway recently launched a new web service called seevl, and will speak about it further at June’s SemTech Conference. According to Passant, seevl “reinvents music discovery. We provide new ways to explore the cultural and musical universe of your favorite artists and to discover new ones by understanding how they are connected. In addition, we let you comment every piece of data about them.” Read more