Posts Tagged ‘neuroscience’

Google Buys DeepMind Technologies, Growing Its Deep Learning Portfolio And Expertise

deepmindGoogle’s letting the cash flow. Fresh off its $3.2 billion acquisition of “conscious home” company Nest, which makes the Nest Learning Thermostat and Protect smoke and carbon monoxide detector, it’s spending some comparative pocket change — $400 million – on artificial intelligence startup DeepMind Technologies.

The news was first reported at re/code here, where one source describes DeepMind as “the last large independent company with a strong focus on artificial intelligence.” The London startup, funded by Founders Fund, was founded by Demis Hassabis, Shane Legg and Mustafa Suleyman, with the stated goal of combining machine learning techniques and neuroscience to build powerful general purpose learning algorithms.

Its web page notes that its first commercial applications are in simulations, e-commerce and games, and this posting for a part-time paid computer science internship from this past summer casts it as “a world-class machine learning research company that specializes in developing cutting edge algorithms to power massively disruptive new consumer products.”

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Helping Students, And Companies, Tackle Jobs And Talent Challenges

rsz_pyimageIt’s not only in June that we’ll see a new crop of graduates emerging from university and post-grad programs. Many students also don cap-and-gown for December ceremonies – a prelude to wearing regular or casual business attire, they hope.

Of course, matching up with the right job is always a challenging prospect. That’s true on many fronts – the slow economy, for one, but also just figuring out what the ideal career fit will be. Pymetrics is hoping to help solve that problem, with its recent announcement of a career assessment and recruiting platform that draws on neuroscience games-based assessment – a nice touch for the crowd that largely grew up with Playstations, Gameboys, iPods, Xboxes and the rest of the digital gaming gang – and machine learning.

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Nara Neural Networking Dining Personalization Service Goes Mobile, Adds Cities, And Targets New Categories With Partners

Early in the summer, The Semantic Web Blog introduced readers to Nara, an advanced neural networking service to automate, personalize and curate web dining experiences for users. (See that story here.)

The service is moving ahead with the launch today of its mobile version, as well as in other respects. “We’re now doing a full-on consumer launch of a polished product on both the web and mobile [platforms],” says CTO Nathan Wilson. “People really are clamoring for the mobile component, especially for this [dining] use case.” Versions for both the iPhone’s iOS and Android operating systems are available.

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Where To Eat? Let Neural Network Computing Help You Decide

Dollars to donuts most folks haven’t ever found a place to eat courtesy of neural networking technology before. Generally, Internet searches for spots to have a bite come courtesy of friends’ Facebook recommendations, services like Yelp, and even some semantically-powered offerings such as BooRah, now an Intuit company.

But the collection of neuroscientists, computer scientists, astrophysicists, and creative artists behind Nara, launching into public beta today, have taken the advanced neural networking route to automate, personalize and curate web dining experiences for users – though there’s more to come on the future menu. President and CEO Tom Copeman says of the company, which in April secured $3.6 million of a $4.5 million equity offering, that its cutting-edge neural network and proprietary and patented algorithms and process for analyzing tons of web data, and personalizing it, including considering user feedback on the suggestions it offers, is creating a whole new category.

That is the pure-play digital lifestyle brand that “creates an emotional connection between us and the Web. We’re trying to change how people think about the web, and from sense of what it means to me, and makes sense to me, and how personal it is to me.”

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