Posts Tagged ‘New York Times’

Georgia Tech Embraces MOOC Model For MS In Computer Science

Now you can get a master’s degree in Computer Science from a prestigious university online. The New York Times has reported that the Georgia Institute of Technology is planning to offer the CS degree via the MOOC (massive open online course) model.

According to the Georgia Tech MS Computer Science program of study website, students can choose specializations in topics such as computational perception and robotics, which includes courses in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and autonomous multi-robot systems among student choices; interactive intelligence, which include courses in knowledge-based AI and natural language; or machine learning, which offers electives in the topic for theory, trading and finance, among other options.

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A Look Back at the 2012 TimesOpen Events

Greg Bates of Programmable Web reports, “The Gray Lady is getting her code on. In Andre Behrens’s New York Times blog, Open, billed as ‘All the code that’s fit to print,’ he recounts events on coding and science held in 2012. Two of the notable events were the well-attended one on Big Data and Smarter Scaling and their Open Source Science Fair. Three speakers graced the Big Data event: Andrew Montalenti the CTO of Parse.ly… James Boehmer, Manager of Search Technology at the New York Times; and Allan Beaufour, CTO of Chartbeat.” Read more

New York Times Working on a Linked Data Search Engine

Aaron Bradley of SEOSkeptic reports, “On Beet.TV, Andy Plesser recently featured a short but fascinating video of Michael Zimbalist, Vice President of Research and Development Operations at the New York Times, talking with Joanna O’Connell of Forrester about a prototype linked data search engine being developed by the Times. Zimbalist begins by talking about the great asset that is the New York Times Index, and the relationship between the Index’s metadata and linked data.” Read more

Dynamic Semantic Publishing for Beginners, Part 2

Even as semantic web concepts and tools are underpinning revolutionary changes in the way we discover and consume information, people with even a casual interest in the semantic web have difficulty understanding how and why this is happening.  One of the most exciting application areas for semantic technologies is online publishing, although for thousands of small-to-medium sized publishers, unfamiliar semantic concepts are too intimidating to grasp the relevance of these technologies. This three-part series is part of my own journey to better understand how semantic technologies are changing the landscape for publishers of news and information.  Read Part 1.

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News and Media Organizations were well represented at the Semantic Technology and Business Conference in San Francisco this year.  Among the organizations presenting were the New York Times, the Associated Press (AP), the British Broadcasting Co. (BBC), Hearst Media Co., Agence France Press (AFP), and Getty Images.

It was interesting to note that, outside of the New York Times, which has been publishing a very detailed index since 1912, many news organizations presenting at the conference did not make the extensive classification of content a priority until the last decade or so.  It makes sense that, in a newspaper publishing environment, creating a detailed and involved index that guides every reader directly to a specific subject mentioned in the paper must not have seemed as critical as it does now– it’s not as though the reader was likely to keep the newspaper for future reference material– so the work of indexing news content by subject as a reference was left for the most part for librarians to do well after an article was published.

In the early days of the internet, categorization of content (where it existed) was limited to simple taxonomies or to free tagging.  News organizations made rudimentary attempts to identify subjects covered by content, but  did not provide much information  about relationships between these subjects.   Search functions matched the words in the search to the words in the content of the article or feature.   Most websites still organize their content this way.

The drawbacks of this approach to online publishing is that it doesn’t make the most of the content “assets” publishers possess.    Digital content has the potential to be either permanent or ephemeral– it can exist and be accessed by a viewer for as long as the publisher chooses to keep it, and many news organizations are beginning to realize the value of giving their material a longer shelf life by presenting it in different contexts.   If you have just read an article about, say, Hillary Clinton, you would might be interested in a related story about the State Department, or perhaps her daughter Chelsea, or her husband Bill….   But how would any content management system be able to serve up a related story if no one had bothered to indicate somewhere what the story is about and how these people and/or concepts are related to one another?

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Expert Schema.org Panel Finalized for #SemTechBiz San Francisco Program

Q: What do Google, Microsoft, Yahoo!, Yandex, the New York Times, and The Walt Disney Company have in common?

A: schema.org

On June 2, 2011, schema.org was launched with little fanfare, but it quickly received a lot of attention. Now, almost exactly one year later, we have assembled a panel of experts from the organizations listed above to discuss what has happened since and what we have to look forward to as the vocabulary continues to grow and evolve, including up-to-the-minute news and announcements. The panel will take place at the upcoming Semantic Technology and Business Conference in San Francisco.

Moderated by Ivan Herman, the Semantic Web Activity Lead for the World Wide Web Consortium, the panel includes representatives from each of the core search engines involved in schema.org, and two of the largest early implementers: The New York Times and Disney. Among the topics we will discuss will be the value proposition of using schema.org markup, publishing techniques and syntaxes, vocabularies that have been mapped to schema.org, current tools and applications, existing implementations, and a look forward at what is planned and what is needed to encourage adoption and consumption.

Panelists:

photo of Ivan Herman Moderator: Ivan Herman
Semantic Web Activity Lead,
World Wide Web Consortium
Photo of Dan Brickley Dan Brickley
Contractor,
schema.org at Google
Photo of John Giannandrea John Giannandrea
Director Engineering,
Google
Photo of Peter Mika Peter Mika
Senior Researcher,
Yahoo!
Photo of Alexander Shubin Alexander Shubin
Product Manager,
Head of Strategic Direction,
Yandex
Photo of Mike Van Snellenberg Mike Van Snellenberg
Principal Program Manager,
Microsoft/Bing
Photo of Evan Sandhaus Evan Sandhaus
Semantic Technologist,
New York Times Company
Photo of Jeffrey Preston Jeffrey W. Preston
SEO Manager,
Disney Interactive Media Group

These panelists, along with the rest of the more than 120 speakers from SemTechBiz, will be on-hand to answer audience questions and discuss the latest work in Semantic Technologies. You can join the discussion by registering for SemTechBiz – San Francisco today (and save $200 off the onsite price)

 

Smart Ad Sophistication Lacking in News Industry, To Its Peril

The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism State of the News Media 2012 report was just published, and among the findings is that efforts by most top news sites to monetize the web in their own right are still limited. Few news companies, it reports, “have made much progress in some key new digital areas. Among the top news websites, there is little use of the digital advertising that is expected to grow most rapidly, so-called “smart,” or targeted, advertising.”

 

 

Failing to make a lot more hay from digital ads is problematic for traditional news companies given the decline in print circulation and in its ad revenue, too. The report says that in 2011, losses in print advertising dollars outpaced gains in digital revenue by a factor of roughly 10 to 1, which it calls an even worse ratio than in 2010.

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Elsevier Competition Results in Some New Apps For Sciverse — And Science

Get ready for some new apps for Elsevier’s Sciverse framework. Last year Elsevier, which has one of the largest vaults of scientific data in the world, launched its Sciverse Applications module. This provided a way for researchers and scientists to develop and share customized solutions that improve search and discovery of its wealth of integrated content and meta-data in the SciVerse hub of ScienceDirect, SciVerse Scopus, Sciverse SciTopics, and targeted web content.

Now it’s announced the winners of its Apps For Science competition, social and semantic ones that plug into the framework among them (see above). Elsevier recognizes that when it comes to meeting researchers’ search and discovery needs, it can’t do it all alone. “We’re not going to come up with all the solutions ourselves, so a key goal is to collaborate with developers and researchers to provide tools,” says Rafael Sidi, Vice President Product Management, Applications Marketplace and Developer Network, Elsevier

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USA Today Opens Up its Data

A recent article reports, “Many newspapers and other traditional media entities still think of themselves as delivering their content in a specific package… But few are thinking about their businesses in radically different ways — as content-generating engines with multiple delivery methods, or as platforms for data, around which other things can be built. USA Today appears to be moving in this direction, by opening up its data for others to use and even commercialize, following in the footsteps of The Guardian and its ground-breaking open platform.” Read more

Semantic Web Jobs: The New York Times

The New York Times Company is looking for a Web Developer in New York, NY. The post states, “NYTimes.com is looking for an experienced and self-motivated Web Developer to drive implementiation of our SEO initiatives. This position will deal with all aspects affecting SEO including server configuration, site performance, and monitoring tools. Other responsibilities include ongoing site maintenance and technical documentation. Strong communication skills are a must as this position interacts heavily with many departments within NYTimes.com.” Read more

rNews 1.0 is an Official Standard!

[UPDATE - November 9, 2011: the IPTC rNews version 1.0 documentation is now available.]

rNews presentastion at Schema.org event

Evan Sandhaus, New York Times (seated) and Andreas Gebhard, Getty Images, present rNews.

Today (Oct. 7, 2011), at a gathering of the International Press Telecommunications Council (IPTC), rNews took the step from being a proposal to being a formal standard. rNews was created by the IPTC and made its public debut earlier this year as a proposal for using RDFa to annotate news-specific metadata in HTML documents.

Congratulations to the IPTC and the leaders of the rNews standardization effort: Andreas Gebhard (Getty Images), Evan Sandhaus (New York Times), and Stuart Myles (Associated Press).

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