Posts Tagged ‘Ontology’

Cognitive Computing And Semantic Technology: When Worlds Connect

ccimageIn mid-July Dataversity.net, the sister site of The Semantic Web Blog, hosted a webinar on Understanding The World of Cognitive Computing. Semantic technology naturally came up during the session, which was moderated by Steve Ardire, an advisor to cognitive computing, artificial intelligence, and machine learning startups. You can find a recording of the event here.

Here, you can find a more detailed discussion of the session at large, but below are some excerpts related to how the worlds of cognitive computing and semantic technology interact.

One of the panelists, IBM Big Data Evangelist James Kobielus, discussed his thinking around what’s missing from general discussions of cognitive computing to make it a reality. “How do we normally perceive branches of AI, and clearly the semantic web and semantic analysis related to natural language processing and so much more has been part of the discussion for a long time,” he said. When it comes to finding the sense in multi-structured – including unstructured – content that might be text, audio, images or video, “what’s absolutely essential is that as you extract the patterns you are able to tag the patterns, the data, the streams, really deepen the metadata that gets associated with that content and share that metadata downstream to all consuming applications so that they can fully interpret all that content, those objects…[in] whatever the relevant context is.”

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Alta Plana Takes The Pulse Of Text Analytics

wordcloudSeth Grimes, president and principal consultant of Alta Plana Corp. and founding chair of the Sentiment Analysis Symposium, has put together a thorough new report, Text Analytics 2014: User Perspectives on Solutions and Providers. Among the interesting findings of the report is that “growth in text analytics, as a vendor market category, has slackened, even while adoption of text analytics, as a technique, has continued to expand rapidly.”

Grimes explains that in a fragmented market, consisting of everything from text analytics services to solution-embedded technologies, the opportunities for users to practice text analytics is strong, but that increasingly text analytics is not the main focal point of the solutions being leveraged.

Reflecting the diversity of options, respondents listed among their providers a number of open-source offerings such as Apache OpenNLP and GATE, API services such as AlchemyAPI and Semantria, and enterprise software solution and business suite providers like SAP. The word cloud above was generated by Alta Plana at Wordle.net to show how users responded to the question of companies they know provide text/content analytics functionality. Nearly 50 percent of users are likely to recommend their most important provider.

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Introducing the New UMBEL Concept Tagger Web Service

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On his personal website, Frederick Giasson reports, “We just released a new UMBEL web service endpoint and online tool: the Concept Tagger Plain. This plain tagger uses UMBEL reference concepts to tag an input text. The OBIE (Ontology-Based Information Extraction) method is used, driven by the UMBEL reference concept ontology. By plain we mean that the words (tokens) of the input text are matched to either the preferred labels or alternative labels of the reference concepts. The simple tagger is merely making string matches to the possible UMBEL reference concepts.” Read more

Cognitum Points To Use Cases For Semantic Knowledge Engineering

fl24Cognitum’s year got off to a good start, with an investment from the Giza Polish Ventures Fund, and it plans to apply some of that funding to building its sales and development teams, demonstrating the approaches to and benefits of semantic knowledge engineering, and focusing on big implementations for recognizable customers. The company’s products include Fluent Editor 2 for editing and manipulating complex ontologies via controlled natural language (CNL) tools, and its NLP-fronted Ontorion Distributed Knowledge Management System for managing large ontologies in a distributed fashion (both systems are discussed in more detail in our story here). “The idea here is to open up semantic technologies more widely,” says CEO Pawel Zarzycki.

To whom? Zarzycki says the company currently has pilot projects underway in the banking sector, which see opportunities to leverage ontologies and semantic management frameworks that provide a more natural way for sharing and reusing knowledge and expressing business rules for purposes such as lead generation and market intelligence. In the telco sector, another pilot project is underway to support asset management and impact assessment efforts, and in the legal arena, the Poland-based company is working with the Polish branch of international legal company Eversheds on applying semantics to legal self-assessment issues. Having a semantic knowledge base can make it possible to automate the tasks behind assessing a legal issue, he says, and so it opens the door to outsourcing this job directly to the entity pursuing the case, with the lawyer stepping in mostly at the review stage. That saves a lot of time and money.

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The Office of Financial Research To Look Hard At FIBO For Financial Instrument Reference Database

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Image Courtesy: Flickr/ .reid

Ontologies are getting a thumbs up to serve as the basis for the Office of Financial Research’s Instruments database. Last week, the Data & Technology Subcommittee of the OFR Financial Research Advisory Committee (FRAC) recommended that the OFR “adopt the goal of developing and validating a comprehensive ontology for financial instruments as part of its overall effort to meet its statutory requirement to ‘prepare and publish’ a financial instrument reference database.”

The Instruments database will define the official meaning of financial instruments for the financial system — derivatives, securities, and so on. The recommendation by the subcommittee is that the OFR conduct its own evaluation of private sector initiatives in this area, including the Financial Industry Business Ontology (FIBO), to assess whether and how ontology can support transparency and financial stability analysis.

FIBO, which The Semantic Web Blog discussed in detail most recently here, is designed to improve visibility to the financial industry and the regulatory community by standardizing the language used to precisely define the terms, conditions, and characteristics of financial instruments; the legal and relationship structure of business entities; the content and time dimensions of market data; and more. The effort is spearheaded by the Object Management Group and the Enterprise Data Management (EDM) Council.

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Semantic Annotation Comes To Home Automation

Courtesy: Flickr/ Moyan_Brenn

Courtesy: Flickr/ Moyan_Brenn

Everyone knows The Clapper for turning electric equipment on and off, right? Sing along: “Clap-on, clap-off….The Clapper.”

Things have come a long way since then, with security, energy management, and more coming along to help turn the average house into a smarter home. Now comes a chance to take things to another level, with semantic-based resource discovery and orchestration in home and building automation. Research led by Michele Ruta, assistant professor at Technical University of Bari, takes on the challenge of bringing together the worlds of semantic web and automation in order to improve what Ruta says are very poor user interaction scenarios.

How? In home automation solutions today, he says, the user is limited to very basic scenarios and very static interaction that requires pre-programming the capabilities the home can assume. “It should be possible to have dynamic interaction, more intelligent interaction with the user, and decisions should be done according to user interest, to a user’s profile,” Ruta says. Semantic technology can be called upon to annotate users’ profiles, interests, and needs against home automation profile options, and make the match between them, he says.

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Off Semantic Tech Goes Into The Wild Blue Yonder

rsz_amprimeLook, up in the sky! It’s a bird, it’s a plane, no – it’s an Amazon drone!

Admittedly, Amazon Prime Air’s unmanned aerial vehicles in commercial use are still a little ways off. But such technology – along with other recent innovations, such as the use of unmanned aircraft in crop-dusting or even Department of Homeland Security border applications, or future capabilities to extend the notion of auto-piloting in passenger airplanes using autonomous machine logic to control airspace and spacing between planes –needs to be accounted for in terms of its impact on the air space. The Next-Generation Air Transportation System is taking on the change in the management and operation of the national air transportation system.

And semantic technology, natural language processing, and machine learning, too, will have a hand in helping out, by fostering collaboration among the agencies that will be working together to develop the system, including the Federal Aviation Administration, the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, under the coordination of the Joint Planning and Development Office. These agencies will need to leverage each other’s knowledge and research, as well as ensure – as necessary – data privacy.

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Interest Grows In Riding The Semantic Wave

Image Courtesy: Flickr/ Peter Kaminski

Image Courtesy: Flickr/ Peter Kaminski

Industry leaders in sectors including banking and financial services look to have high hopes for semantic technology. They’re thinking about FIBO (Financial Industry Business Ontology) and leveraging semantic technology for more traditional types of data integration and analytics projects. At Cognizant, Thomas Kelly, a director in its Enterprise Information Management practice – and the author of this white paper on How Semantic Technology Drives Agile Business – sees the positive development that clients in the Fortune 500 space like these “are maturing in their use of semantic technology, from a project focus to more enterprise initiatives.”

The interest in FIBO, he says, is representative of an overall interest across in industries in leveraging industry ontologies as mechanisms to help companies better standardize, align and learn from the output of industry-wide efforts. The attention that industry analysts, including Gartner, have put on the semantic web in the last year – not to mention regulators beginning to consider its use in sharing information on a regulatory basis – have helped increase interest by commercial organizations, Kelly notes. That’s also evident in the life sciences sector, as another example, with the efforts of the FDA/PhUSE  Semantic Technology Working Group Project to include a draft set of existing CDISC standards in RDF.

The pickup in attention to many things semantic ties to the different perspectives that organizations need to manage about their data, which include “how they currently think of their data, how it is currently perceived in managing business operations; and where they are looking to go in the future that makes it more inclusive of what’s going on in the world outside their walls – that is, how the rest of the industry looks at this data and uses it to support their business processes,” he says.

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Hello 2014 (Part 2)

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Courtesy: Flickr/faul

Picking up from where we left off yesterday, we continue exploring where 2014 may take us in the world of semantics, Linked and Smart Data, content analytics, and so much more.

Marco Neumann, CEO and co-founder, KONA and director, Lotico: On the technology side I am personally looking forward to make use of the new RDF1.1 implementations and the new SPARQL end-point deployment solutions in 2014 The Semantic Web idea is here to stay, though you might call it by a different name (again) in 2014.

Bill Roberts, CEO, Swirrl:   Looking forward to 2014, I see a growing use of Linked Data in open data ‘production’ systems, as opposed to proofs of concept, pilots and test systems.  I expect good progress on taking Linked Data out of the hands of specialists to be used by a broader group of data users.

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Hello 2014

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Courtesy: Flickr/Wonderlane

Yesterday we said a fond farewell to 2013. Today, we look ahead to the New Year, with the help, once again, of our panel of experts:

Phil Archer, Data Activity Lead, W3C:

For me the new Working Groups (WG) are the focus. I think the CSV on the Web WG is going to be an important step in making more data interoperable with Sem Web.

I’d also like to draw attention to the upcoming Linking Geospatial Data workshop in London in March. There have been lots of attempts to use Geospatial data with Linked Data, notably GeoSPARQL of course. But it’s not always easy. We need to make it easier to publish and use data that includes geocoding in some fashion along with the power and functionality of Geospatial Information systems. The workshop brings together W3C, OGC, the UK government [Linked Data Working Group], Ordnance Survey and the geospatial department at Google. It’s going to be big!

[And about] JSON-LD: It’s JSON so Web developers love it, and it’s RDF. I am hopeful that more and more JSON will actually be JSON-LD. Then everyone should be happy.

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