Posts Tagged ‘OpenTable’

Power To Your Own Data: Haggle Helps You Make Deals

haggleFormer Personalized Media CEO Rajiv Salimath hosts a launch party March 1 for his latest venture, Haggle. What Haggle’s about, he says, is letting people use their own data to show venues – starting with restaurants – how they’re a valuable customer, and turn that to their purchasing advantage.

Users can apply today for their shot at getting personalized pricing via the Haggle mobile app through realtime digital interactions with businesses that have also signed onto the platform. By launch that should include some 75 restaurants in New York, with the goal of hitting 100 to 150 there and another 150 in the San Francisco area in the spring.

How it works, Salimath says, is that users give the app access to their social data, which it crunches and gives back to them. “We take all your social and digital data and convert it to real-world metrics that matter,” he says. “We give you the data to negotiate with businesses.” It calculates four scores including social influence, loyalty to a particular spot, history of going to places of that type generally (seafood restaurants, for instance), and purchasing power, and based on those scores a screen swipe for the locale reveals the personalized discount that venue is willing to give the user – which he or she may attempt to further negotiate online. All the user needs to do is show the screen to the wait staff for the discount to be applied to the bill.

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Reason To Be Thankful: Being Named A Fast-Growing Tech Company

rsz_thankful_imageIt’s got to be a happy Thanksgiving for a number of tech companies that made their way to Deloitte’s recently-released Technology Fast 500. The 2013 ranking of the fastest-growing tech companies based in North America also has something to show for anyone who’s doubted that there’s money to be made taking advantage of semantic and other Web 3.0 concepts, a look at the list should show it’s time for the doubting to stop.

Have a look at some of the winners with their overall rankings:

#2 Acquia. Drupal claims the title of being the first mainstream content management system to support semantic web technology in its core. The Drupal-powered project Acquia was co-founded by Drupal creator Dries Buytaert to provide cloud, SaaS, and other services to organizations building websites on Drupal – and has on staff software engineer Stéphane Corlosquet, who had a big hand in bringing those semantic capabilities to Drupal’s core. In fact, Corlosquet spoke at the most recent SemTechBiz about Acquia as an example of a Drupal-powered project managing its content as Linked Data.

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Where Schema.org Is At: A Chat With Google’s R.V. Guha

 

rvg Interested in how schema.org has trended in the last couple of years since its birth? If you were at The International Semantic Web Conference event in Sydney a couple of weeks back, you may have caught Google Fellow Ramanathan V. Guha — the mind behind schema.org — present a keynote address about the initiative.

Of course, Australia’s a far way to go for a lot of people, so The Semantic Web Blog is happy to catch everyone up on Guha’s thoughts on the topic.

We caught up with him when he was back stateside:

The Semantic Web Blog: Tell us a little bit about the main focus of your keynote.

Guha: The basic discussion was a progress report on schema.org – its history and why it came about a couple of years ago. Other than a couple of panels at SemTech we’ve maintained a rather low profile and figured it might be a good time to talk more about it, and to a crowd that is different from the SemTech crowd.

The short version is that the goal, of course, is to make it easier for mainstream webmasters to add structured data markup to web pages, so that they wouldn’t have to track down many different vocabularies, or think about what Yahoo or Microsoft or Google understands. Before webmasters had to champion internally which vocabularies to use and how to mark up a site, but we have reduced that and also now it’s not an issue of which search engine to cater to.

It’s now a little over two years since launch and we are seeing adoption way beyond what we expected. The aggregate search engines see about 15 percent of the pages we crawl have schema.org markup. This is the first time we see markup approximately on the order of the scale of the web….Now over 5 million sites are using it.  That’s helped by the mainstream platforms like Drupal and WordPress adopting it so that it becomes part of the regular workflow. Read more

Querying the Whole Web of Data: a vision

Internet Splat MapThe holy grail of the Semantic Web is to have intelligent agents that will be able to do all types of stuff for us, similar to what Siri is starting to do. Imagine my Semantic Web agent knows that I’ll be traveling to Bonn, Germany and will make a reservation at a restaurant that it thinks that I would like and that a friend has recommended. Theoretically, this is possible if all the data on the Web was published as Linked Data. Just imagine TripIt data linked to Facebook and to DBpedia which in turn is linked to Yelp and OpenTable. My Semantic Web agent would be able to query all of this data together and pull it off. Technically, the technology exists to allow this to happen. The only things that are missing are:

  1. data published as Linked Data on the Web, including links between data from different sources, and
  2. a way to query everything together. I’m personally excited about the second issue: querying the Web as if it were a gigantic database.

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