Posts Tagged ‘OWL’

Easing The Way To Linked Open Data In The Geosciences Domain

ocenapixThe OceanLink Project is bringing semantic technology to the geosciences domain – and it’s doing it with the idea in mind of not forcing that community to have to become experts in semtech in order to realize value from its implementation. Project lead Tom Narock of Marymount University, who recently participated in an online webinar that discussed how semantics is being implemented to integrate ocean science data repositories, library holdings, conference abstracts, and funded research awards, noted that this effort is “tackling a particular problem in ocean sciences, but [can be part of a] more general change for researchers in discovering and integrating interdisciplinary resources, [when you] need to do federated and complex searches of available resources.”

The project has an interest in using more formal, stronger semantics – working with OWL, RDF, reasoners – but also an acknowledgement that a steeper learning curve comes with the territory. How to balance that with what the community is able to implement and use? The answer: “In addition to exposing our data using semantic technologies, a big part of Oceanlink is building cyber infrastructure that will help lessen the burden on our end users.”

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The Web Is 25 — And The Semantic Web Has Been An Important Part Of It

web25NOTE: This post was updated at 5:40pm ET.

Today the Web celebrates its 25th birthday, and we celebrate the Semantic Web’s role in that milestone. And what a milestone it is: As of this month, the Indexed Web contains at least 2.31 billion pages, according to WorldWideWebSize.  

The Semantic Web Blog reached out to the World Wide Web Consortium’s current and former semantic leads to get their perspective on the roads The Semantic Web has traveled and the value it has so far brought to the Web’s table: Phil Archer, W3C Data Activity Lead coordinating work on the Semantic Web and related technologies; Ivan Herman, who last year transitioned roles at the W3C from Semantic Activity Lead to Digital Publishing Activity Lead; and Eric Miller, co-founder and president of Zepheira and the leader of the Semantic Web Initiative at the W3C until 2007.

While The Semantic Web came to the attention of the wider public in 2001, with the publication in The Scientific American of The Semantic Web by Tim Berners-Lee, James Hendler and Ora Lassila, Archer points out that “one could argue that the Semantic Web is 25 years old,” too. He cites Berners-Lee’s March 1989 paper, Information Management: A Proposal, that includes a diagram that shows relationships that are immediately recognizable as triples. “That’s how Tim envisaged it from Day 1,” Archer says.

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Keep On Keeping On

“There is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage than the creation of a new order of things…. Whenever his enemies have the ability to attack the innovator, they do so with the passion of partisans, while the others defend him sluggishly, so that the innovator and his party alike are vulnerable.”
–Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince (1513)

Atlanta's flying car laneIn case you missed it, a series of recent articles have made a Big Announcement:

The Semantic Web is not here yet.

Additionally, neither are flying cars, the cure for cancer, humans traveling to Mars or a bunch of other futuristic ideas that still have merit.

A problem with many of these articles is that they conflate the Vision of the Semantic Web with the practical technologies associated with the standards. While the Whole Enchilada has yet to emerge (and may never do so), the individual technologies are finding their way into ever more systems in a wide variety of industries. These are not all necessarily on the public Web, they are simply Webs of Data. There are plenty of examples of this happening and I won’t reiterate them here.

Instead, I want to highlight some other things that are going on in this discussion that are largely left out of these narrowly-focused, provocative articles.

First, the Semantic Web has a name attached to its vision and it has for quite some time. As such, it is easy to remember and it is easy to remember that it Hasn’t Gotten Here Yet. Every year or so, we have another round of articles that are more about cursing the darkness than lighting candles.

In that same timeframe, however, we’ve seen the ascent and burn out failure of Service-Oriented Architectures (SOA), Enterprise Service Buses (ESBs), various MVC frameworks, server side architectures, etc. Everyone likes to announce $20 million sales of an ESB to clients. No one generally reports on the $100 million write-downs on failed initiatives when they surface in annual reports a few years later. So we are left with a skewed perspective on the efficacy of these big “conventional” initiatives.

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Hello 2014 (Part 2)

rsz_lookahead2

Courtesy: Flickr/faul

Picking up from where we left off yesterday, we continue exploring where 2014 may take us in the world of semantics, Linked and Smart Data, content analytics, and so much more.

Marco Neumann, CEO and co-founder, KONA and director, Lotico: On the technology side I am personally looking forward to make use of the new RDF1.1 implementations and the new SPARQL end-point deployment solutions in 2014 The Semantic Web idea is here to stay, though you might call it by a different name (again) in 2014.

Bill Roberts, CEO, Swirrl:   Looking forward to 2014, I see a growing use of Linked Data in open data ‘production’ systems, as opposed to proofs of concept, pilots and test systems.  I expect good progress on taking Linked Data out of the hands of specialists to be used by a broader group of data users.

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TopQuadrant Launches TopBraid Enterprise Vocabulary Net 4.3

TopQuadrant

RALEIGH, N.C.–(BUSINESS WIRE)– TopQuadrant™, a leading semantic data integration company, today announced the release of version 4.3 of TopBraid Enterprise Vocabulary Net (TopBraid EVN), a web-based solution that simplifies the development and management of interconnected vocabularies. With the latest release, TopBraid EVN can now be used to edit arbitrary RDFS/OWL ontologies and acts as a powerful platform for other semantic editing environments. Read more

Semantic Web Jobs: Automation Technologies, Inc.

Automation Technologies Inc. LogoAutomation Technologies, Inc. is looking for a “Senior Java Developer with an Ontology background” in the Fort George Meade, Maryland area. The position requires an Active Top Secret/SCI (TS/SCI) with Polygraph Clearance.   This is an additional position added to the ATI team.

While the main role is Java development, the person in this role “partners with senior customer leadership to provide strategic support to help organizations improve performance by using ontologies, triple stores and reasoning for analyzing situations, identifying gaps, and proposing solutions. Serves as a performance change agent; influences stakeholder decisions by “selling” strategic performance concepts. Uses a variety of performance strategies, tools, and interventions (i.e., organizational development, needs or trend analysis, needs assessment, training evaluation, etc.) to implement change, monitor solution implementation, and assure organizational success. Develops networks and alliances, and collaborates across boundaries with a wide range of stakeholders. Serves as an expert resource for customer executives. ”

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Semantic Web Job: Healthline

Healthline Networks LogoHealthline Networks is seeking an Informatics Sr. Java Software Engineer in San Francisco, California. This position offers the opportunity to “Work with dynamic Engineering and Medical Informatics Teams to enhance Healthline’s medical ontology. Healthline is a web health technology company, employing tools for the future.” The Responsibilities include: “Design and implement algorithms for integrating medical standard dictionaries into Healthline ontology; Develop data mining processes to create our Semantic Network; Work on an authoring tool that allows Medical Informatics Specialists to successfully and easily edit our ontology; Read more

A Look Into Learning SPARQL With Author Bob DuCharme

Cover of Learning SPARQL - Second Edition, by Bob DuCharmeThe second edition of Bob DuCharme’s Learning SPARQL debuted this summer. The Semantic Web Blog connected with DuCharme – who is director of digital media solutions at TopQuadrant, the author of other works including XML: The Annotated Specification, and also a welcome speaker both at the Semantic Technology & Business Conference and our Semantic Web Blog podcasts – to learn more about the latest version of the book.

Semantic Web Blog: In what I believe has been two years since the first edition was published, what have been the most significant changes in the ‘SPARQL space’ – or the semantic web world at large — that make this the right time for an expanded edition of Learning SPARQL?

DuCharme: The key thing is that SPARQL 1.1 is now an actual W3C Recommendation. It was great to see it so widely implemented so early in its development process, which justified the release of the book’s first edition so long before 1.1 was set in stone, but now that it’s a Recommendation we can release an edition of the book that is no longer describing a moving target. Not much in SPARQL has changed since the first edition – the VALUES keyword replaced BINDINGS, with some tweaks, and some property path syntax details changed – but it’s good to know that nothing in 1.1 can change now.

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The Business Value of Reasoning with Ontologies

[Editor's note: this guest post was co-written by Héctor Pérez-Urbina (Clark & Parsia) and Juan Sequeda (Capsenta)]

Image of a human brain with computer data overlay.Important enterprise business logic is often buried deep within a complex ecosystem of applications. Domain constraints and assumptions, as well as the main actors and the relations with one another, exist only implicitly in thousands of lines of code distributed across the enterprise.

Sure, there might be some complex UML diagrams somewhere accompanied by hundreds of pages of use case descriptions; but there is no common global representation of the domain that can be effectively shared by enterprise applications. When the domain inevitably evolves, applications must be updated one by one, forcing developers to dive into long-forgotten code to try to make sense of what needs to be done. Maintenance in this kind of environment is time-consuming, error-prone, and expensive.

The suite of semantic technologies, including OWL, allows the creation of rich domain models (a.k.a., ontologies) where business logic can be captured and maintained. Crucially, unlike UML diagrams, OWL ontologies are machine-processable so they can be directly exploited by applications.

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Introduction to: Reasoners

Name Tag: Hello, we are ReasonersReasoning is the task of deriving implicit facts from a set of given explicit facts. These facts can be expressed in OWL 2 ontologies and stored RDF triplestores. For example, the following fact: “a Student is a Person,” can be expressed in an ontology, while the fact: “Bob is a Student,” can be stored in a triplestore. A reasoner is a software application that is able to reason. For example, a reasoner is able to infer the following implicit fact: “Bob is a Person.”

Reasoning Tasks

Reasoning tasks considered in OWL 2 are: ontology consistency, class satisfiability, classification, instance checking, and conjunctive query answering.

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