Posts Tagged ‘OWL’

2014 Year In Review: Thanks For The Good Times, Part 2

Image courtesy: https://www.flickr.com/photos/antmo/

Image courtesy: https://www.flickr.com/photos/antmo/

Today we continue our look back at the best of times for The Semantic Web and related fields in 2014 (see here for our first story in this series):

Ian Hersey, Saffron Chief Product Officer:

Cognitive Computing in 2014 has certainly captured a lot of buzz, thanks in part to IBM’s strong push on Watson, but also largely thanks to consumer trends – both wearables and the rising use and sophistication of consumer agent interfaces on mobile devices such as Google Now, Microsoft Cortana and Siri (not to mention the Lowe’s robot). These systems are not truly cognitive, but in their limitations they illustrate to the consumer the art of the possible, and frequently consumer shifts drive enterprise IT shifts.

Currently, though, the promise of rich experiential data from the Internet of Things (consumer and industrial) is still a largely untapped opportunity for enterprises. Product companies from appliance manufactures to automakers to aircraft manufacturers have provisioned their products with sometimes tens of thousands of sensors, but they are as yet unable to intelligently tap into insights these sensors can provide — not just individually but in the aggregate.

Arnaud Le Hors, IBM Software Group Senior Technical Staff Member, Open Web Standards: Read more

2014 Year In Review: Thanks For The Good Times, Part 1

Image courtesy: https://www.flickr.com/photos/antmo/

Image courtesy: https://www.flickr.com/photos/antmo/

As has been our tradition these last few years, The Semantic Web Blog steps back for experts in it and in related spaces to give us their opinion of the highlights of 2014. Here is Part 1:

Vladimir Alexiev, OntotextData and Ontology Management Lead:

Strong interest and commitment by the Cultural Heritage community to LOD (see this story); – emergence of a Linguistic LD cloud; much enlarged and improved DBpedia data sets; new European Community research instruments in Horizon 2020 that promote commercial innovation and startups.

 

Phil Archer, W3C  Activity Lead:

Easy. JSON-LD.I know I’m cheating as it was developed a good while ago, but it became a W3C Rec in January 2014 and it is a game changer for the Semantic Web. The publishing industry likes it, schema.org likes it, even developers who come out in a serious rash at the mention of triples like it because they can ignore the LD (Linked Data) part if they want.

It’s also helping the other ongoing growth story, which is schema.org. If it isn’t already, it’s becoming the format of choice for annotating new pages; you can put it all in a block at the top and not have to integrate it within the HTML. That’s a lot easier for some people to work with. And schema.org is expanding its scope too. The work on actions ties in with Activity Streams (and therefore Cards [containers for content]). It’s all part of the ongoing move from desktop to mobile, from Web pages to tasks and services. Since that’s all dependent on links, and those links can be encoded in JSON-LD, the potential for the growth of the Linked Data side of the Semantic Web is substantial.

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What’s Next In Knowledge-Driven Finance?

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Photo courtesy: https://www.flickr.com/photos/free-stock/

Next week in the U. K. members of the financial industry will be coming together at The Universal Strategy: Knowledge-Driven Finance Event, hosted by semantic technology vendor Ontotext. The event, says independent consultant in semantics and event organizer Jarred McGinnis, is aimed at giving participants “a snout to tail view of semantics in finance.”

The use cases, he says, are there, and to that end the panel will include presentations by Financial Times CTO John O’Donovan, who will discuss issues including how the publisher’s semantic approach is driving smarter topic pages. (The event actually takes place at The Financial Times site.) Also scheduled to be present is Mike Bennett, director at Hypercube and Semantics Lead at The EDM Council, which is a cross-industry group developing the Financial Industry Business Ontology (FIBO), and John Schlesinger, Chief Enterprise Architect at Temenos, which develops software for retail banking companies, including solutions that will leverage triple stores.

In a preview of his talk, Bennett spoke to The Semantic Web Blog that about the current state of FIBO affairs.

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Semantic Web Job: Information Solution Architect

Jeppesen logoJeppesen is seeking an information solution architect. The job description states: “This person will serve as an Information Architect for development of a large, geospatial data management system. Specifically, this person will specify and implement approaches to ensure efficient access, editing, and transaction management for geospatial data and work in the database and access layer of the system. This involves tuning the Physical Data Model and optimization for performance with Oracle 12c Spatial and Graph, Oracle Workspace Manager, and custom developed data access frameworks and services in Java.  This person will interact with data modeling, database administration, data center/IT, and software engineering teams.” Read more

Cognitive Computing And Semantic Technology: When Worlds Connect

ccimageIn mid-July Dataversity.net, the sister site of The Semantic Web Blog, hosted a webinar on Understanding The World of Cognitive Computing. Semantic technology naturally came up during the session, which was moderated by Steve Ardire, an advisor to cognitive computing, artificial intelligence, and machine learning startups. You can find a recording of the event here.

Here, you can find a more detailed discussion of the session at large, but below are some excerpts related to how the worlds of cognitive computing and semantic technology interact.

One of the panelists, IBM Big Data Evangelist James Kobielus, discussed his thinking around what’s missing from general discussions of cognitive computing to make it a reality. “How do we normally perceive branches of AI, and clearly the semantic web and semantic analysis related to natural language processing and so much more has been part of the discussion for a long time,” he said. When it comes to finding the sense in multi-structured – including unstructured – content that might be text, audio, images or video, “what’s absolutely essential is that as you extract the patterns you are able to tag the patterns, the data, the streams, really deepen the metadata that gets associated with that content and share that metadata downstream to all consuming applications so that they can fully interpret all that content, those objects…[in] whatever the relevant context is.”

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Semantically Aligned Design Principles At Core of Australian Electronic Health Records Platform

site-header-10th-blog-304x200At the upcoming Semantic Technology & Business Conference in San Jose, Dr. Terry Roach, principal of  CAPSICUM Business Architects, and Dr. Dean Allemang, principal consultant at Working Ontologist, will host a session on A Semantic Model for an Electronic Health Record (EHR). It will focus on Australia’s electronic-Health-As-A-Service  (eHaas) national platform for personal electronic health records, provided by the CAPSICUM semantic framework for strategically aligned business architectures.

Roach and Allemang participated in an email interview with The Semantic Web Blog to preview the topic:

The Semantic Web Blog: Can you put the work you are doing on the semantic EHR model in context: How does what Australia is doing with its semantic framework compare with how other countries are approaching EHRs and healthcare information exchange?

Roach and Allemang: The eHaaS project that we have been working on has been an initiative of Telstra, a large, traditional telecommunications provider in Australia. Its Telstra Health division, which is focused on health-related software investments, for the past two years has embarked on a set of strategic investments in the electronic health space. Since early 2013 it has acquired and/or established strategic partnerships with a number of local and international healthcare software providers ranging from hospital information systems [to] mobile health applications [to] remote patient monitoring systems to personal health records [to] integration platforms and health analytics suites.

At the core of these investments is a strategy to develop a platform that captures and maintains diverse health-related interactions in a consolidated lifetime health record for individuals. The eHaaS platform facilitates interoperability and integration of several health service components over a common secure authentication service, data model, infrastructure, and platform. Starting from a base of stand-alone, vertical applications that manage fragmented information across the health spectrum, the eHaaS platform will establish an integrated, continuously improving, shared healthcare data platform that will aggregate information from a number of vertical applications, as well as an external gateway for standards-based eHealth messages, to present a unified picture of an individual’s health care profile and history.

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Easing The Way To Linked Open Data In The Geosciences Domain

ocenapixThe OceanLink Project is bringing semantic technology to the geosciences domain – and it’s doing it with the idea in mind of not forcing that community to have to become experts in semtech in order to realize value from its implementation. Project lead Tom Narock of Marymount University, who recently participated in an online webinar that discussed how semantics is being implemented to integrate ocean science data repositories, library holdings, conference abstracts, and funded research awards, noted that this effort is “tackling a particular problem in ocean sciences, but [can be part of a] more general change for researchers in discovering and integrating interdisciplinary resources, [when you] need to do federated and complex searches of available resources.”

The project has an interest in using more formal, stronger semantics – working with OWL, RDF, reasoners – but also an acknowledgement that a steeper learning curve comes with the territory. How to balance that with what the community is able to implement and use? The answer: “In addition to exposing our data using semantic technologies, a big part of Oceanlink is building cyber infrastructure that will help lessen the burden on our end users.”

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The Web Is 25 — And The Semantic Web Has Been An Important Part Of It

web25NOTE: This post was updated at 5:40pm ET.

Today the Web celebrates its 25th birthday, and we celebrate the Semantic Web’s role in that milestone. And what a milestone it is: As of this month, the Indexed Web contains at least 2.31 billion pages, according to WorldWideWebSize.  

The Semantic Web Blog reached out to the World Wide Web Consortium’s current and former semantic leads to get their perspective on the roads The Semantic Web has traveled and the value it has so far brought to the Web’s table: Phil Archer, W3C Data Activity Lead coordinating work on the Semantic Web and related technologies; Ivan Herman, who last year transitioned roles at the W3C from Semantic Activity Lead to Digital Publishing Activity Lead; and Eric Miller, co-founder and president of Zepheira and the leader of the Semantic Web Initiative at the W3C until 2007.

While The Semantic Web came to the attention of the wider public in 2001, with the publication in The Scientific American of The Semantic Web by Tim Berners-Lee, James Hendler and Ora Lassila, Archer points out that “one could argue that the Semantic Web is 25 years old,” too. He cites Berners-Lee’s March 1989 paper, Information Management: A Proposal, that includes a diagram that shows relationships that are immediately recognizable as triples. “That’s how Tim envisaged it from Day 1,” Archer says.

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Keep On Keeping On

“There is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage than the creation of a new order of things…. Whenever his enemies have the ability to attack the innovator, they do so with the passion of partisans, while the others defend him sluggishly, so that the innovator and his party alike are vulnerable.”
–Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince (1513)

Atlanta's flying car laneIn case you missed it, a series of recent articles have made a Big Announcement:

The Semantic Web is not here yet.

Additionally, neither are flying cars, the cure for cancer, humans traveling to Mars or a bunch of other futuristic ideas that still have merit.

A problem with many of these articles is that they conflate the Vision of the Semantic Web with the practical technologies associated with the standards. While the Whole Enchilada has yet to emerge (and may never do so), the individual technologies are finding their way into ever more systems in a wide variety of industries. These are not all necessarily on the public Web, they are simply Webs of Data. There are plenty of examples of this happening and I won’t reiterate them here.

Instead, I want to highlight some other things that are going on in this discussion that are largely left out of these narrowly-focused, provocative articles.

First, the Semantic Web has a name attached to its vision and it has for quite some time. As such, it is easy to remember and it is easy to remember that it Hasn’t Gotten Here Yet. Every year or so, we have another round of articles that are more about cursing the darkness than lighting candles.

In that same timeframe, however, we’ve seen the ascent and burn out failure of Service-Oriented Architectures (SOA), Enterprise Service Buses (ESBs), various MVC frameworks, server side architectures, etc. Everyone likes to announce $20 million sales of an ESB to clients. No one generally reports on the $100 million write-downs on failed initiatives when they surface in annual reports a few years later. So we are left with a skewed perspective on the efficacy of these big “conventional” initiatives.

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Hello 2014 (Part 2)

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Courtesy: Flickr/faul

Picking up from where we left off yesterday, we continue exploring where 2014 may take us in the world of semantics, Linked and Smart Data, content analytics, and so much more.

Marco Neumann, CEO and co-founder, KONA and director, Lotico: On the technology side I am personally looking forward to make use of the new RDF1.1 implementations and the new SPARQL end-point deployment solutions in 2014 The Semantic Web idea is here to stay, though you might call it by a different name (again) in 2014.

Bill Roberts, CEO, Swirrl:   Looking forward to 2014, I see a growing use of Linked Data in open data ‘production’ systems, as opposed to proofs of concept, pilots and test systems.  I expect good progress on taking Linked Data out of the hands of specialists to be used by a broader group of data users.

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