Posts Tagged ‘RDFa 1.1’

Should Microdata Become a W3C Standard?

Manu Sporny recently voiced his personal objection to the W3C microdata candidate recommendation. He writes, “The HTML Working Group at the W3C is currently trying to decide if they should transition the Microdata specification to the next stage in the standardization process. There has been a call for consensus to transition the spec to the Candidate Recommendation stage. From a standards perspective, this is a huge mistake and sends the wrong signal to Web developers everywhere. The problem is that we already have a set of specifications that are official W3C recommendations that do what Microdata does and more. RDFa 1.1 became an official W3C Recommendation last summer.”

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Manu Sporny on HTML5 and RDFa 1.1

HTML 5 logoManu Sporny has published an interesting article regarding HTML5 and RDFa 1.1. He writes, “The newly re-chartered RDFa Working Group at the W3C published a First Public Working Draft ofHTML5+RDFa 1.1 today. This might be confusing to those of you that have been following the RDFa specifications. Keep in mind that HTML5+RDFa 1.1 is different from XHTML+RDFa 1.1, RDFa Core 1.1, and RDFa Lite 1.1 (which are official specs at this point). This is specifically about HTML5 and RDFa 1.1. The HTML5+RDFa 1.1 spec reached Last Call (aka: almost done) status at W3C via the HTML Working Group last year. So, why are we doing this now and what does it mean for the future of RDFa in HTML5?” Read more

Big News at Schema.org

Dan Brickley has posted a great article on the Schema.org blog commenting on some major developments surrounding schema.org. He writes, “Schema.org was launched a year ago. This week several of the schema.org team returned to the SemTechBiz conference for a panel to discuss where we are, and where we’re going.  Schema.org is all about shared vocabulary, rather than any specific markup encoding. As we reported last year, the RDFa Working Group have been working hard to address feedback from schema.org and others. Yesterday’s panel gave us the chance to be the first to welcome W3C’s announcement that RDFa 1.1 is now a full W3C recommendation. This new standard, in particular the RDFa Lite specification, brings together the simplicity of Microdata with improved support for using multiple schemas together.” Read more

RDFa 1.1 is a Formal Recommendation

Ivan Herman, Semantic Web Activity Lead for the W3C, made the announcement from the podium of the Schema.org panel at SemTechBiz SF that RDFa 1.1, RDFa Lite and XHTML+RDFa have been published as candidate recommendations by the W3C. He writes, “Together, these documents outline the vision for RDFa in a variety of XML and HTML-based Web markup languages. RDFa Core 1.1 specifies the core syntax and processing rules for RDFa 1.1 and how the language is intended to be used in XML documents. RDFa Lite 1.1 provides a simple subset of RDFa for novice web authors. XHTML+RDFa 1.1 specifies the usage of RDFa in the XHTML markup language.” Read more

Web Developers Can Now Easily “Play” with RDFa

Kids playingYesterday, we announced RDFa.info, a new site devoted to helping developers add RDFa (Resource Description Framework-in-attributes) to HTML.

Building on that work, the team behind RDFa.info is announcing today the release of “PLAY,” a live RDFa editor and visualization tool. This release marks a significant step in providing tools for web developers that are easy to use, even for those unaccustomed to working with RDFa.

“Play” is an effort that serves several purposes. It is an authoring environment and markup debugger for RDFa that also serves as a teaching and education tool for Web Developers. As Alex Milowski, one of the core RDFa.info team, said, “It can be used for purposes of experimentation, documentation (e.g. crafting an example that produces certain triples), and testing. If you want to know what markup will produce what kind of properties (triples), this tool is going to be great for understanding how you should be structuring your own data.”

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New Resource for Web Developers – Add Linked Data to HTML with RDFa.info

screen shot of RDFa.info home pageFor Web Developers who have been looking for resources devoted to adding Linked Data to HTML, there’s a new site available today: RDFa.info. Visitors are greeted with the following headline, “RDFa is an extension to HTML5 that helps you markup things like People, Places, Events, Recipes and Reviews. Search Engines and Web Services use this markup to generate better search listings and give you better visibility on the Web, so that people can find your website more easily.” SemanticWeb.com has covered RDFa’s development and use in the past and we’ve often heard from developers that they were looking for such a starting place.

Photo of Manu Sporny

Manu Sporny

Led by members of the RDFa Community, RDFa.info provides information and resources aimed at dispelling the myth that RDFa is difficult to implement. SemanticWeb.com caught up with Manu Sporny, one of the creators of the site, to learn more about its goals and resources: “One of the misconceptions that RDFa has, is being seen as a very programmer-centric extension to HTML. This misconception is unfortunate because it was built for Web developers, and with the right introduction to it, anyone can author RDFa.”

He continued, “We wanted a site that captured and taught the essence of RDFa to Web Developers. We wanted the site to gather a set of documentation and tools that would help web developers not only learn about authoring RDFa, but help them write markup, show them the result of their markup, and point out any issues with their RDFa-enabled web pages.”

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The Current State of RDFa 1.1

On his private website, Ivan Herman recently commented on the current status of RDFa 1.1. Herman stated, “There has been a flurry of activities around RDFa 1.1 in the past few months. Although a number of blogs and news items have been published on the changes, all those have become ‘officialized’ only the past few days with the publication of the latest drafts, as well as with the publication of RDFa 1.1 Lite. It may be worth looking back at the past few months to have a clearer idea on what happened.” Read more

BREAKING: Schema.org announces intent to support RDFa Lite!

Last month, we reported on the new RDFa 1.1 Lite proposal by Ben Adida. In our recent podcast on Schema.org with guest Ramanathan V. Guha, we touched on the topic of RDFa Lite as well.

Today, schema.org spokesperson Dan Brickley posted that “we’re pleased to give advance notice of a new way of adopting schema.org’s structured data vocabulary. W3C’s RDF Web Applications group are right now putting the finishing touches to the latest version of the RDFa standard. This work opens up new possibilities also for developers who intend to work with schema.org data using RDF-based tools and Linked Data, and defines a simplified publisher-friendly ‘Lite’ view of RDFa.”

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Introduction to: RDFa 1.1 Lite

[Editor's Note: In our most recent SemanticLink podcast with special guest R.V. Guha, we mentioned RDFa 1.1 Lite, proposed by Ben Adida at last month's Schema.org workshop. Thanks to Manu Sporny for sharing the following look at RDFa 1.1 Lite.]

Summary: RDFa 1.1 Lite is a simple subset of RDFa consisting of the following attributes: vocab, typeof, property, rel, about and prefix.

During the schema.org workshop, a proposal was put forth by RDFa’s resident hero, Ben Adida, for a stripped down version of RDFa 1.1, called RDFa 1.1 Lite. The RDFa syntax is often criticized as having too much functionality, leaving first-time authors confused about the more advanced features. This lighter version of RDFa will help authors easily jump into the Linked Data world. The goal was to create a very minimal subset that will work for 80% of the folks out there doing simple markup for things like search engines. Read more

Schema.org Workshop – A Path Forward

photo of schema-org leadership panel at workshop

schema.org Leadership Panel; L-to-R: Michael O'Connor (Microsoft), John Giannandrea (Google), Charlie Jiang (Microsoft), Kavi Goel (Google), R.V. Guha (Google), Steve MacBeth (Microsoft), Gaurav Mishra (Yahoo), Peter Mika (Yahoo)

A room full of interested parties gathered in Microsoft’s Silicon Valley Campus yesterday to discuss Schema.org, its implications on existing vocabularies, syntaxes, and projects, and how best to move forward with what has admittedly been a bumpy road.

Schema.org, you may recall, is the vocabulary for structured data markup that was released by Google, Microsoft, and Bing on June 2 of this year.  The schema.org website states, “A shared markup vocabulary makes easier for webmasters to decide on a markup schema and get the maximum benefit for their efforts. So, in the spirit of sitemaps.org, Bing, Google and Yahoo! have come together to provide a shared collection of schemas that webmasters can use.”  (For more history about the roll-out and initial reactions to it, here’s a summary.)

Yesterday was the first time since the Semantic Technology & Business Conference in San Francisco that community members have gathered face-to-face to discuss Schema.org in an open forum. It was a full agenda with plenty of opportunity for debate and discussion.

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