Posts Tagged ‘regulatory’

FIBO Summit Opening Remarks by EDMC Managing Director Mike Atkin

[Editor’s Note: As our own Jennifer Zaino recently reported, the Enterprise Data Management (EDM) Council, a not-for-profit trade association dedicated to addressing the practical business strategies and technical implementation realities of enterprise data management held a two day FIBO Technology Summit in conjunction with MediaBistro’s Semantic Technology & Business (SemTechBiz) Conference, June 7th and 8th in San Francisco, California.  SemTechBiz was chosen for the summit because of its close proximity to the leading minds in Silicon Valley.
 
In afternoon and morning sessions, lead by distinguished academic and industry leaders, 60 top developers discussed 4 key technology challenges and developed plans that will lead to solutions critical to simultaneously lowering the cost of operations in financial institutions and ensuring the transparency required by regulations put in place since the beginning of the financial crisis of 2008.
 
Michael Atkin, EDM Council Managing Director began the deliberations with the following charge to the assembled experts.]

Photo of Mike Atkin, Managing Director, EDM CouncilI spent the majority of my professional life as the scribe, analyst, advocate, facilitator and therapist for the information industry.   I started with the traditional publishers and then moved on to my engagement in the financial information industry.  I watched the business of information evolve through lots of IT revolutions … from microfiche to Boolean search to CD-ROM to videotext to client server architecture to the Internet and beyond.

At the baseline of everything was the concept of data tagging – as the key to search, retrieval and data value.  I saw the evolution from SGML (which gave rise to the database industry).  I witnessed the separation of content from form with the development of HTML.  And now we are standing at the forefront of capturing meaning with formal ontologies and using inference-based processing to perform complex analysis.

I have been both a witness to (and an organizer of) the information industry for the better part of 30 years.  It is my clear opinion that this development – and by that I mean the tagging of meaning and semantic processing is the most important development I have witnessed.  It is about the representation of knowledge.  It is about complex analytical processing.  It is about the science of meaning.  It is about the next phase of innovation for the information industry.

Let me see if I can put all of this into perspective for you.  Because my goal is to enlist you into our journey.  Read more

FIBO, FIBO, It’s Off To A Financial Industry Business Ontology We Go

 

Photo Courtesy: Flickr, epicharmus

Credit default swaps. Collateralized debt obligations. Moral hazards. The average person might find the financial services sector and its language as mystifying as some of those involved in the industry might find semantic technology. An event hosted by OMG and the EDM Council in New York City yesterday was aimed at demystifying the latter for Wall Street. But putting the technology to work there might help clarify the discourse around financial instruments for a wider audience, including the regulators who want to deal with concentration of risk issues that played a big role in the Wall Street meltdown.

One part of the picture is FIBO, the Financial Industry Business Ontology, which was the subject of two sessions at the event. An advance discussion of the topic with Thematix principals Elisa Kendall and Jim Rhyne, who was a panelist at the event, set the stage for us here at The Semantic Web Blog. “The primary practical use for an ontology like FIBO that is descriptive of various kinds of financial instruments, including so-called exotics, is that regulators and financial market participants get a common language to talk about things,” Rhyne explains. This is important, given that financial regulators try hard to be collaborative with the industry, pointing out the need, he says, for careful management of financial instruments, including recommendations about capital buffers to deal with downside risk and asking for timely reports of information that would allow them to assess the possibility that a systemic problem could occur rather than directly intervening by stopping trades.

Especially in the derivatives marketplace, there is a lot of “funky terminology,” he says, and not all of it is as well-understood as it should be. Different parties and different parts of the marketplace may call the same instrument by different terms, and one of FIBO’s aims is to provide a common vocabulary.

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