Posts Tagged ‘Richard Wallis’

194 Million Linked Open Data Bibliographic Work Descriptions Released by OCLC

OCLC WorldCat logoYesterday, Richard Wallis gave a peek into some exciting new developments in the OCLC’s Linked Open Data (LOD) efforts.  While these have not yet been formally announced by OCLC, they represent significant advancements in WorldCat LOD. Our reporting to date on LOD at WorldCat is here.

Most significantly, OCLC has now released 194 Million Linked Open Data Bibliographic Work descriptions. According to Wallis, “A Work is a high-level description of a resource, containing information such as author, name, descriptions, subjects etc., common to all editions of the work.” In his post, he uses the example of “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” as a Work.

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Video: Shared Library Data at the ALA Annual 2013

Logo of the OCLCRegular readers of this blog may know that Linked Data and Semantic Web technologies are gaining significant traction in the worlds of Libraries, Archives, and Museums. Earlier this summer, Richard Wallis (Technology Evangelist) and Ted Fons (Executive Director, Data Services and WorldCat Quality) of the OCLC discussed and demonstrated how that organization in particular is sharing library data. This presentation was delivered at the Annual Conference of the American Libraries Association in Chicago.

The presentations by Fons and Wallis serve as good introductory pieces to practical Linked Data use, and the potential benefits of using Linked Data as a platform for knowledge management for large collections of data.  Wallis also discusses why OCLC chose to use schema.org as a vocabulary.

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Part II:

Ready, Set, Lightning! 5-Minute Talks at SemTechBiz — Part 2

During the recent Semantic Technology and Business Conference in San Francisco, a motley crew of expert presenters got up in front of a packed room, took a deep breath, and spoke passionately about the semantic projects nearest and dearest to their hearts while the unforgiving clock ticked their five precious minutes away. At the conference I shared highlights from some of those aptly named Lightning Sessions. Here are a few more snappy sessions that captivated the room that day:

Semantic Technology to Shed Light on Big Dark Data with Ben Zamanzadeh, DataPop

DataPop is a startup in the field of semantic advertising. The company seeks to create actionable insights for clients with semantics. As Ben put it, “Ad data is still dark data. Consumer actions are very hard to understand and even harder to predict.” The talk description explains DataPop’s approach: “DataPop’s Semantic Advertising Technology uses Machine Learned Semantic Models to build and analyze advertising campaigns that surpasses conventional advertising capabilities. Composite Semantic Data Models are used to translate Big piles of Data into meaningful entities, then Inference Engines transcribe information such that decisions and strategies can be formed. Semantic Methods has made it possible for us to explain the reasoning behind ‘why’ things happen.” Read more

Libraries: Time To Take Your Place On The Web Of Data

At The Semantic Technology and Business conference in San Francisco Monday, OCLC technology evangelist Richard Wallis broke the news that Content-negotiation was implemented for the publication of Linked Data for WorldCat resources. Last June, WorldCat.org began publishing Linked Data for its bibliographic treasure trove, a global catalog of more than 290 million library records and some 2 billion holdings, leveraging schema.org to describe the assets.

“Now you can use standard Linked Data technologies to bring back information in RDF/ XML, JSON, or Turtle,” Wallis said. Or triples. “People can start playing with this today.” As he writes in his blog discussing the news, they can manually specify their preferred serialization format to work with or display, or do it from within a program by specifying to the http protocol for the format to accept from accessing the URI.

“Two hundred ninety million records on the web of Linked Data is a pretty good chunk of stuff when you start talking content negotiation,” Wallis told the Semantic Web Blog.

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The Future of Libraries, Linked Data and Schema.Org Extensions

Image Courtesy Flickr/ Paul Lowry

 

Yesterday The Semantic Link Podcast featured Karen Coyle, a consultant in library technology who’s consulted for esteemed institutions including the Library of Congress. Coyle discussed libraries’ long history with metadata, including with the MARC (machine-readable cataloging) format for nearly 50 years, and of sharing that metadata. That history helps explain why libraries, she said, are looking at semantic web technology – but also why changes to established processes are huge undertakings. “The move toward Linked Data will be the most significant change in library data in these two centuries,” she said, requiring the move from mainly textual data into using identifiers for things and data instead of strings.

Today, The Semantic Web Blog continues the discussion by sharing some perspectives on the topic from OCLC technology evangelist Richard Wallis. As noted in yesterday’s podcast, change has its challenges. “Getting the library community to get its head around Linked Data as a replacement for MARC … will be a bit of a challenge,” Wallis says. While more members of the library community are starting to “get” Linked Data, and what can be accomplished by extracting entities and linking between them, some still struggle with why change can’t just occur within the MARC format itself or its successor Resource Description and Access (RDA), that provides atomistic, machine-actionable data and machine-interpretable relationships. RDA, Wallis reminds us, took a decade from inception to publication and business model.

“The ramifications of turning into the Linked Data world are quite deep and meaningful but it will be a few years for that to be established in the library world,” Wallis says.

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Schema.org and Libraries: Coming to a Consensus

Richard Wallis of DataLiberate recently wrote, “Back in September I formed a W3C Group – Schema Bib Extend.  To quote an old friend of mine ‘Why did you go and do that then?‘  Well, as I have mentioned before Schema.org has become a bit of a success story for structured data on the web.  I would have no hesitation in recommending it as a starting point for anyone, in any sector, wanting to share structured data on the web.  This is what OCLC did in the initial exercise to publish the 270+ million resources in WorldCat.org as Linked Data. At the same time, I believe that summer 2012 was a bit of a watershed for Linked Data in the library world.  Over the preceding few years we have had various national libraries publishing linked data (British LibraryBibliothèque nationale de FranceDeutsche National BibliothekNational Library of Sweden, to name just a few).  Read more

Step-by-Step: Putting WorldCat Data Into Triple Stores

Richard Wallis has followed up his recent announcement that WorldCat data can now be downloaded as RDF triples with an explanation of how to put that data into a triple store. He begins: “Step 1: Choose a triplestore.  I followed my own advise and chose 4Store.  The main reasons for this choice were that it is open source yet comes from an environment where it was the base platform for a successful commercial business, so it should work.  Also in my years rattling around the semantic web world, 4Store has always been one of those tools that seemed to be on everyone’s recommendation list.” Read more

Download WorldCat Data as RDF Triples

Richard Wallis has written an article about the latest updates to WorldCat.org. He writes, “After we experimentally added RDFa embedded linked data, using Schema.org markup and some proposed Library extensions, to WorldCat pages, one the most often questions I was asked was where can I get my hands on some of this raw data? We are taking the application of linked data to WorldCat one step at a time so that we can learn from how people use and comment on it. So at that time if you wanted to see the raw data the only way was to use a tool [such as the W3C RDFA 1.1 Distiller] to parse the data out of the pages, just as the search engines do.” Read more

The Significance of WorldCat.org Linked Data Updates

Photo of Library interiorAs we reported a few days ago, WorldCat.org pages now include schema.org markup. Richard Wallis has provided further insight into this news in a new article: “OCLC have been at the leading edge of publishing bibliographic resources as linked data for several years.  At dewey.info they have been publishing the top levels of the Dewey classifications as linked data since 2009.  As announced yesterday, this has now been increased to encompass 32,000 terms, such as this one for the transits of Venus.  Also around for a few years is VIAF (the Virtual International Authorities File) where you will find URIs published for authors, such as this well known chap.  These two were more recently joined by FAST (Faceted Application of Subject Terminology), providing usefully applicable identifiers for Library of Congress Subject Headings and combinations thereof.” Read more

OCLC Announcement: WorldCat.org Meets Schema.org (and hints of more to come)

image of library from Shutterstock.comOCLC has announced that WorldCat.org pages now include schema.org descriptive mark-up.

Created over the last four decades with the participation of thousands of member libraries, WorldCat is the world’s largest online registry of library collections. As the official press release states, “WorldCat.org now offers the largest set of linked bibliographic data on the Web. With the addition of Schema.org mark-up to all book, journal and other bibliographic resources in WorldCat.org, the entire publicly available version of WorldCat is now available for use by intelligent Web crawlers, like Google and Bing, that can make use of this metadata in search indexes and other applications.”

On the heels of the announcement earlier this week about Dewey Decimal Classifications also being available as Linked Data, this certainly marks an exciting week in the world of library information and the Semantic Web. However, this should also prove to be exciting for non-librarians, as these resources are now available beyond the world of library sciences.

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