Posts Tagged ‘Saas’

A Look Ahead For Linked Data

rsz_swirrllogoAt Swirrl, the focus continues to be bringing more users aboard the Linked Data train. It’s helping to realize this aim in part thanks to the work it’s doing with customers, primarily in the government sector. The company’s bringing its PublishMyData platform (which The Semantic Web Blog first discussed here) to customers such as the U.K.’s Department for Communities and Local Government, which is looking to Linked Data to help publish statistical data and useful reference data about local government and also information about the department’s performance to increase transparency, which is consumed primarily by other public sector organizations, charities, and entities that report to the department but are not part of it.

“Usually that was done in a mish-mash of technologies, and depended on individuals that do lots of hard work with spreadsheets to make it work,” says founder and CEO Bill Roberts. He characterizes the department’s move to Linked Data as a bit of a leap of faith, driven by its open data strategist Steve Peters and a vision of what can be achieved by moving in this direction. During engagements like this one, Roberts notes, Swirrl has gotten some strong insight, as well, into how to improve its solution for people who aren’t “dyed-in-the-wool Linked Data heads. That’s fed into things we’re working on,” including plans in the pipeline to build tools that make the self-service process easier.

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Silk for Teams Brings Semantic Web Site Creation To Groups

rsz_silk_logoSemantic web site creation platform Silk, which just received another $1.6 million via an extended seed round investment from New Enterprise Associates (NEA), is adding to its offerings. Silk for Teams brings to organizations, or groups within them, the chance to use its cloud-based platform to build, share, and search across structured collections of data, visualize it, and mix it with unstructured content for all-in-one views of information that previously may have been scattered across multiple applications and documents.

“In really big enterprise IT, you see things like Sharepoint and custom-built infrastructures” for team collaboration, says Silk CEO and co-founder Salar al Khafaji. A lot of smaller teams in companies or startups try to do the same via shared folders and documents, and that’s a gap that Silk wants to close, he says. “It’s surprising how many companies are running so much of their business from something like a shared spreadsheet. It’s a huge limitation but they don’t have the expertise or resources to build their own infrastructures.”

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Searchbox Wants To Help You Build Your Enterprise’s Specialized Search Engine

Searchbox is taking its enterprise semantic search technology in a new direction. The offering, which The Semantic Web Blog initially covered here, today is packaged as a software-as-a-service (SaaS) solution, and it’s now based on the Apache Solr open source enterprise search platform from the Apache Lucene project rather than on proprietary technology.

“We completely changed the technology stack for keyword search and integrated our semantic technology into Solr,” says chief product officer Jonathan Rey. On top of Apache Solr, he says, the company developed a search application framework that IT managers, CIOs, and developers can leverage to provide a richer experience to end users.

“There is no such thing as ‘standard enterprise search.’ Searchbox is a platform onto which companies can build a specialized search engine,” Rey says.

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Volume, Emotion, Sponsorship: What Brands Have An Edge on Social Media Strategies?

Market Strategies International recently released the first edition of what it says will be an annual Social Media Brand Index, a measure for brands both of consumer-generated social media about them and of their own sponsored content. The Index takes into account four components. Volume, or the amount of buzz about a brand online, is one of them — and its most highly weighted component, too. The others take their cue from what we might call more meaning-related measures, sentiment analytics and semantic markup among them.

For example, there’s net Sentiment, which Market Strategies says represents the ratio of positive to negative sentiments expressed about a brand based on automated natural language processing of the content of posts, comments and mentions. Another component, Positive Emotions, seems to flow from that measure, representing the number of content items that are identified as having the warm fuzzies about them, again based on automated coding of content.

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