Posts Tagged ‘#schemaorg’

GitHub Adds schema.org Actions to Email Notifications via JSON-LD

GitHub logoStéphane Corlosquet has noticed that GitHub has added schema.org Actions using the JSON-LD syntax to the notification emails that GitHub users receive.

On Twitter, Corlosquet posted:

Tweet from @scolorquet: "Looks like @github just started to use http://schema.org  actions with JSON-LD in their notifications emails! "

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New Schema.org Extension Proposal for the Automotive Industry

Photo: Interior of automobileThere is no doubt about it: Schema.org is a big success. It has motivated hundreds of thousands of Web site owners to add structured data markup to their HTML templates and brought the idea of exchanging structured data over the WWW from the labs and prototypes to real business.

Unfortunately, the support for information about the sales and rental of vehicles, namely cars, motorbikes, trucks, boats, and bikes has been insufficient for quite a while. Besides two simple classes for http://schema.org/Vehicle and http://schema.org/Car with no additional properties, there was nothing in the vocabulary that would help marking up granular vehicle information in new or used car listing sites or car rental offers.

Recently, Mirek Sopek, Karol Szczepański and I have released a fully-fledged extension proposal for schema.org that fixes this shortcoming and paves the ground for much better automotive Web sites in the light of marketing with structured data.

This proposal builds on the following vehicle-related extensions for GoodRelations, the e-commerce model of schema.org:

It adds the core classes, properties and enumerated values for describing cars, trucks, busses, bikes, and boats and their features. For describing commercial aspects of related offers, http://schema.org/Offer already provides the necessary level of detail. Thus, our proposal does not add new elements for commercial features.

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Add schema.org Actions to Your Own Knowledge Graph (Video — Part 3)

[Editor's note: this is Part 3 of a series. See Part 1 and Part 2]

schema dot org logoIn Part 3 of this series, Jarek Wilkiewicz details activating the small Knowledge Graph (built on Cayley) with Schema.org Actions. He begins by explaining how Actions can be thought of as a combination of “Entities” (things) and “Affordances” (uses). As he defines it, “An affordance is a quality of an object, or an environment, which allows an individual to perform an action.”

For example, an action, might be using the “ok Google” voice command on a mobile device. The even more specific example that Wilkiewicz gives in the video (spoiler alert) is that of using the schema.org concept of potentialAction to trigger the playing of a specific artist’s music in a small music store’s mobile app.

To learn more, and to meet Jarek Wilkiewicz and his Google colleague, Shawn Simister, in person, register for the Semantic Technology & Business Conference where they will present “When 2 Billion Freebase Facts is Not Enough.”

How to Build Your Own Knowledge Graph (Video – Part 1)

Photo of Jarek WilkiewiczStraight out of Google I/O this week, came some interesting announcements related to Semantic Web technologies and Linked Data. Included in the mix was a cool instructional video series about how to “Build a Small Knowledge Graph.” Part 1 was presented by Jarek Wilkiewicz, Knowledge Developer Advocate at Google (and SemTechBiz speaker).

Wilkiewicz fits a lot into the seven-and-a-half minute piece, in which he presents a (sadly) hypothetical example of an online music store that he creates with his Google colleague Shawn Simister. During the example, he demonstrates the power and ease of leveraging multiple technologies, including the schema.org vocabulary (particularly the recently announced ‘Actions‘), the JSON-LD syntax for expressing the machine readable data, and the newly launched Cayley, an open source graph database (more on this in the next post in this series).

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Schema.org Introduces Concept of Role

Image of soccer team depicting question: What is this player's role?In a post yesterday at the official schema.org blog, Vicki Tardif Holland (Google) and Jason Johnson (Microsoft) have announced that schema.org has created a way to more richly describe relationships between entities in structured markup. The addition of the “Role” schema allows for the description of more complex relationships than were previously possible. In the post, the authors cite the business need as one that is often found in the domains of entertainment and sports.

For example, in schema.org, it can be asserted that Bill Murray was an actor in the film Ghostbusters [Fig. 1].

visualization of the basic relationship between Bill Murray as an actor Ghostbusters.

Figure 1

That’s all well and good, but how can one extend this relationship to include more detail such as the name of the character Mr. Murray played in the film? More on that in a moment.

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New schema.org Technical Brief Available from LRMI and Cetis

Image of Technical Brief by LRMI about schema.org.The Learning Resource Metadata Initiative (LRMI) has released a technical briefing about schema.org. The paper was co-authored by Phil Barker and Lorna M. Campbell of Cetis, the Centre for Educational Technology, Interoperability and Standards.

LRMI, which we have reported on here, “has developed a common metadata framework for describing or ‘tagging’ learning resources on the web.”

The Cetis website says, “This briefing describes schema.org for a technical audience. It is aimed at people who may want to implement schema.org markup in websites or other tools they build but who wish to know more about the technical approach behind schema.org and how to implement it. We also hope that this briefing will be useful to those who are evaluating whether to implement schema.org to meet the requirements of their own organization.”

In making the announcement in a W3C list, Barker explained, “We often find that when explaining the technology approach of LRMI we are mostly talking about schema.org, so this briefing, which describes the schema.org specification for a technical audience should be of interest to anyone thinking about implementing or using LRMI in a website or other tool. It should also be of interest to people who plan to use schema.org for describing other types of resources.”

The technical brief can be downloaded from:

http://publications.cetis.ac.uk/2014/960

WorldCat Releases 197 Million Nuggets of Linked Data

worldcatRichard Wallis of OCLC reports on his Data Liberate blog, “A couple of months back I spoke about the preview release of Works data from WorldCat.org.  Today OCLC published a press release announcing the official release of 197 million descriptions of bibliographic Works. A Work is a high-level description of a resource, containing information such as author, name, descriptions, subjects etc., common to all editions of the work.  The description format is based upon some of the properties defined by the CreativeWork type from the Schema.org vocabulary.  In the case of a WorldCat Work description, it also contains [Linked Data] links to individual, OCLC numbered, editions already shared from WorldCat.org.” Read more

UPDATE: The Semantic Web Has Killed SEO. Long Live SEO.

[UPDATE: This panel has a new panelist! Mike Arnesen, SEO Team Manager of SwellPath will participate in New York.]

seo-is-dead-long-live-seoOn October 3 at the New York Semantic Technology & Business Conference (#SemTechBiz), a panel of experts will tackle the issue of how Semantic Web technologies are rapidly changing the landscape of Search Engine Optimization. The panel, titled “The Semantic Web Has Killed SEO. Long Live SEO.,” is made up of Aaron Bradley, David Amerland, Barbara Starr, Duane Forrester, and Mike Arnesen.

The session will address numerous issues at the intersection of Semantic Web and SEO. As the description reads, “From rich snippets to the Google Knowledge Graph to Bing Snapshots semantic technology has transformed the look, feel and functionality of search engines.”

Have these changes undermined the ways in which websites are optimized for search, effectively “killing” SEO? Or are tried-and-true SEO tactics still effective? And what does the future hold for SEO in a semantic world?

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Video: Shared Library Data at the ALA Annual 2013

Logo of the OCLCRegular readers of this blog may know that Linked Data and Semantic Web technologies are gaining significant traction in the worlds of Libraries, Archives, and Museums. Earlier this summer, Richard Wallis (Technology Evangelist) and Ted Fons (Executive Director, Data Services and WorldCat Quality) of the OCLC discussed and demonstrated how that organization in particular is sharing library data. This presentation was delivered at the Annual Conference of the American Libraries Association in Chicago.

The presentations by Fons and Wallis serve as good introductory pieces to practical Linked Data use, and the potential benefits of using Linked Data as a platform for knowledge management for large collections of data.  Wallis also discusses why OCLC chose to use schema.org as a vocabulary.

Part I:

Part II:

Analysis of Brand-Related Knowledge Graph Search

Depiction of entities connected in the Google Knowledge GraphIn a recent post on the Moz.com blog, Dr. Peter J. Myers wrote about an apparent change that took place on the morning of July 19th that appears to be related to how Google processes Knowledge Graph entities. “My gut feeling is that Google has bumped up the volume on the Knowledge Graph, letting KG entries appear more frequently,” Myers posted.

The morning of July 19th was specifically identified because, Myers explained, “Overnight, the number of queries we track in the MozCast 10K beta system that show some kind of Knowledge Graph jumped from 17.8% to 26.7%, an increase of over 50%. This was not a test or a one-day fluke — here’s a graph for all of July 2013 (as of August 20th, the number has remained stable near 27%).

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