Posts Tagged ‘seevl’

Schema.org Takes Action

actionstatusThis week saw schema.org introduce vocabulary that enables websites to describe the actions they enable and how these actions can be invoked, in the hope that these additions will help unleash new categories of applications, according to a new post by Dan Brickley.

This represents an expansion of the vocabulary’s focus point from describing entities to taking action on these entities. The work has been in progress, Brickley explains here, for the last couple of years, building on the http://schema.org/Action types added last August by providing a way of describing the capability to perform actions in the future.

The three action status type now includes PotentialActionStatus for a description of an action that is supported, ActiveActionStatus for an in-progress action, and CompletedActionStatus, for an action that has already taken place.

 Read more

New Seevl API Lets Developers Add Music and Artist Data to Apps

seevl

Steve O’Hear of TechCrunch reports, “Dublin-based Seevl has released an API for developers to let them easily add music recommendations and artist data to their apps. The new offering gives app makers access to some of the underlying technology that currently powers the Seevl consumer-facing app, which is a cross-service music discovery offering that gives music recommendations and lets you build ‘mix tapes’, amongst a plethora of music-related features. The Seevl API is powered by the startup’s own music meta-data graph, which itself is built on top of Freebase, Wikipedia and MusicBrainz, and uses Seevl’s in-house semantic technologies and recommendation and search algorithms — both founders, Alexandre Passant and Julie Letierce, previously worked at the renowned Semantic Web R&D lab DERI.” Read more

Music Discovery Service seevl.fm Launches

screen shot of seevl.fm search: Lou ReedThis week marked the public launch of seevl.fm.

SemanticWeb.com has tracked seevl’s development through various incarnations, including a YouTube plugin and as a service for users of Deezer (available as a Deezer app). This week’s development, however, sees the service emerge as a stand-alone, cross-browser, cross-platform, mobile-ready service; a service that is free and allows for unlimited search and discovery. So, what can one do with seevl?

Following the death of Lou Reed this week, I (not surprisingly) saw mentions of the artist skyrocket across my social networks. People were sharing memories and seeking information — album and song titles, lyrics, biographies, who influenced Reed, who Reed influenced, and a lot of people simply wanted to listen to Reed’s music.  A quick look at the seevl.fm listing for Lou Reed shows a wealth of information including a music player pre-populated with some of the artist’s greatest hits.

Read more

Let The Music Play On: iTunes Radio Arrives Soon With Siri Support

Does the leading Internet radio service Pandora, which is based on Pandora Media’s Music Genome Project, have anything to fear from Apple?

Apple’s iPhone 5C and 5S smartphones, formally launched yesterday, boast the new iOS 7 operating system to be officially released next week, and that means they also boast iTunes Radio. Craig Federighi, senior vice president of Software Engineering, talked about the expected feature at the launch, according to reports, discussing how users can create their own stations from favored artists, songs and genres, a la Pandora.

iTunes Radio will be available to iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, Mac, PC, and Apple TV users. As consumers use iTunes Radio more, it will get to know their tastes to deliver more of what they like. Pandora, which just celebrated the 5-year anniversary of its iPhone app in July, works by letting users pop in a favorite artist, song, or genre name for the Music Genome Project to scan against the million or so pieces of music it’s already analyzed by their various attributes, with music “genes” related to characteristics like type of background vocals or gender of lead vocalist, to find options with similar musical features.

Read more

Music To Your Ears: Seevl Takes First Step To Become Cross-Platform Music Discovery Service

Seevl, the free music discovery service that leverages semantic technology to help users conduct searches across a world of facts-in-combination to find new musical experiences and artist information, has launched an app for Deezer that will formally go live Monday.  (See our in-depth look at Seevl here, and a screencast of how the service works here.) Deezer is a music streaming service available in more than 150 countries – not the U.S. yet, though – that claims more than 20 million users.

Seevl, which late last year updated its YouTube plug-in with more music discovery features and better integration with the YouTube user interface, models its data in RDF. In a blog post earlier this year, founder and CEO Alexandre Passant explained how the Seevl service uses Redis for simple key-value queries and SPARQL for some more complex operations, like recommendations or social network analysis, as well as provenance. As for the new Deezer app, it provides the same features as the YouTube app for easily navigating and discovering music among millions of tracks, Passant tells the Semantic Web Blog.

Read more

Universities Put Cash Towards Helping HomeGrown Tech Startups Along

Image Photo Courtesy Flickr/401(K) 2012

Universities play an important role in advancing the technology ecosystem, semantic technology included. Look for starters at work done at The Tetherless World Constellation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Wright State University’s Kno.e.sis Ohio Center of Excellence in Knowledge-enabled Computing, MIT, and the Digital Enterprise Research Institute located at the National University of Ireland, Galway.

In addition to driving technology ever forward, institutions like these and others also provide a home for incubating good ideas that could become good businesses. Music discovery service Seevl and the enterprise-focused SindiceTech are two examples of semantic spin-outs from DERI, for instance, while MIT Media Lab gave birth to commercial properties with semantic underpinnings including music intelligence platform The Echo Nest. The Kno.e.sis Center points work it’s doing in the commercial direction, too: Its LinkedIn profile description notes that its “work is predominantly multidisciplinary, and multi-institutional, often involving industry collaborations and significant systems developing, with an eye towards real-world impact, technology licensing, and commercialization.”

Given the projects with commercial prospects underway within their own houses, it would seem there’s opportunity for universities themselves to look for even more ways to contribute to that success. And that’s just what the University of Minnesota is doing: This week it said that it’s launching a $20 million seed fund over a ten-year timeframe to support the innovative ideas to which its campus plays host.

Read more

Seevl Accepted to Dogpatch Labs Incubation Centre

Conor Harrington of Galway Independent reports, “A spin-out company from NUI Galway’s Digital Enterprise Research Institute (DERI) has been accepted into the prestigious incubation centre, Dogpatch Labs, which has its European headquarters in Dublin. Seevl, is a music discovery tool which contextualises users’ music listening experience online and then allows them to discover new music, and is designed to benefit both those who listen to and who create music. It was founded two years ago by two researchers at DERI, Dr Alexandre Passant and Julie Letierce, taking on a third employee last year.” Read more

Semantic Web Jobs: Seevl

Seevl is looking for a Frontend Engineer in Galway, Ireland. According to the company, “We are a small and growing start-up, starving to build beautiful products for music junkies. We are looking for people that share our vision, have a passion for music and a nerdiness for all things data-related… We are currently hiring our first full-time engineer to join the team! We are looking for a talented and passionate individual that will work essentially on front-end development (HTML5, CSS, JQuery and friends, mobile frameworks) but who can easily switch to back-end when needed (Python, APIs, JSON).” Read more

Liner Notes for YouTube – Seevl Plugin

Seevl.netSeevl, the music discovery service built on Semantic Technology that I wrote about a few months ago, has released a significant update to their plugin for YouTube. The plugin is still only available for the Google Chrome browser, but other browser plugins are in the works. You can grab the Chrome plugin here.

Once the plugin is installed, the user has new options available when visiting YouTube. First, there’s a new search option next to the standard YouTube search bar.

Image of Seevl search Link on YouTube site

Read more

Report from Day 5 at ISWC

Juan Sequeda photo[Editor's Note: This is Juan Sequeda's final report from the International Semantic Web Conference in Bonn, Germany. See his other reports here:
Day 1 | Day 2 | Day 3 | Day 4 | Day 5 ]

Day 5 of ISWC 2011 was the third full day and last day of the conference. It started with a keynote from Gerhard Weikum title “For a few more triples“. The rest of the day consisted of sessions on Outrageous IdeasSocial WebIn-Use: Content Management,  Ontology EvaluationOntology Matching and MappingUser Interaction and In Use: Applications. The highlight of the day was the Closing Ceremony, where the winners of several prizes were announced.
Read more

NEXT PAGE >>