Posts Tagged ‘semantic search’

Your TV May Soon Tell You What You Want to Watch

nhkJohn Boyd of IEEE Spectrum reports, “With satellite, cable, and terrestrial TV stations broadcasting in the hundreds and Internet-based entertainment content companies also competing for viewers’ attention, finding something to watch is, strangely, a growing challenge. To help simplify the task, researchers at Japan’s public TV and radio broadcaster Nippon Hoso Kyokai, better known as NHK, plan to begin testing technology to automatically assess in real time a viewer’s interest in a TV program or video and then suggest other programs to watch based on the results.” Read more

Upcoming Hackathon at Cornell Showcases Smart Search

cornellDebra Eichten of the Cornell Chronicle recently wrote, “At the Big Red//Hacks event Sept. 26-28 – billed as the first student-run, large-scale hackathon at Cornell University – participants will have access to a semantic intelligence application program interfaceAPI, the core technology for a new startup, Speare.  Speare founder and CEO Rahul Shah ’16 said his passion for understanding information, coupled with meeting students who shared an interest in entrepreneurship, resulted in the creation of Speare – a startup business that harnesses semantic intelligence to understand the meaning of textual information.” Read more

Famo.us Raises $25M to Help Users Make Apps with JavaScript

fam-300x234Kara Swisher reports on Recode, “Famo.us, an unusual programming startup that allows users to make nifty mobile apps using JavaScript, has raised $25 million in additional funding and added high-profile investor Jerry Murdock to its board. The new round comes after two others — one for $1.1 million and another for $4 million. About $20 million of the new round is in exchange for equity, while $5 million is debt. Along with Murdock — whose investments via Insight Venture Partners have included Nest, Flipboard and Twitter — Samsung Ventures and Javelin Venture Partners are also participating, the company said. The San Francisco-based company is aimed at using JavaScript, the sometimes disrespected programming language, to create a product that is easy to use by a range of developers, even non-techies. To help promulgate that, Famo.us also offers a free online ‘university’ where anyone can learn to program using its tools.” Read more

Yahoo Acquires Local Search App Zofari

zofariMenchie Mendoza of TechTimes recently wrote, “Affectionately described as a ‘Pandora for places,’ Zofari’s acquisition seemed to have attracted less attention when the deal was announced last week. Zofari uses natural language processing, machine learning, and third party data to collect information that matches up the user with places which the user may find interesting. The financial terms of the acquisition have not been revealed. On Zofari’s official site, the company confirmed that four of its employees are joining Yahoo. They are identified as Oliver Su, Shahzad Aziz, Jason Kobilka and Nate Weinstein. ‘After meeting some of the amazing folks on the Yahoo Search team and hearing about their vision, the decision for our team to join Yahoo was an easy one,’ said in the announcement. ‘We can’t talk about what we’re working on yet, but needless to say we are very, very excited’.” Read more

How Semantic Search Predicts the Future

11066925735_dbe0318b25Daniel Newman of Forbes recently wrote his third and final article in a series on the future of marketing and how that future is interwoven with semantic search. Newman writes, “The internet is getting smarter and this growing intelligence and insights is populating a new kind of semantic web that is providing more than just the most relevant results for people searching, but also some key data to marketers that may just tell us about intent. For movie fans out there, you may remember the movie Minority Report. In this Tom Cruise feature film the star would go out and stop crimes before they would happen as intelligence reached a point where it could see a crime that was about to be committed. At the time the concept seemed pretty far fetched, but really this type of intelligence is very similar to how the semantic web may be able to tell you who may be your next big customer.” Read more

Drupal Deepens Semantic Web Ties

semtechbiz-10th-125sqAmong the mainstream content management systems, you could make the case that Drupal was the first open source semantic CMS out there. At next week’s Semantic Technology and Business Conference, software engineer Stéphane Corlosquet of Acquia, which provides enterprise-level services around Drupal, and Bock & Co. principal Geoffrey Bock will discuss in this session Drupal’s role as a semantic CMS and how it can help organizations and institutions that are yearning to enrich their data with more semantics – for search engine optimization, yes, but also for more advanced use cases.

“It’s very easy to embed semantics in Drupal,” says Bock, who analyses and consults on digital strategies for content and collaboration. At its core it has the capability to manage semantic entities, and in the upcoming version 8 it takes things to a new level by including schema.org as a foundational data type. “It will become increasingly easier for developers to build and deliver semantically enriched environments,” he says, which can drive a better experience both for clients and stakeholders.

Corlosquet, who has taken a leadership role in building semantic web capabilities into Drupal’s core and maintains the RDF module in Drupal 7 and 8, explains that the closer embrace of schema.org in Drupal is of course a help when it comes to SEO and user engagement, for starters. Google uses content marked up using schema.org to power products like Rich Snippets and Google Now, too.

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Not a Keyword, But a Conversation: The Future of Search

Google HummingbirdDaniel Newman of Forbes recently wrote, “In the future, and really even today, the most qualified and successful searches are going to be driven by conversations. When Google Hummingbird was launched, Google used the idea of conversation rather than keyword as one of the biggest evolutions taking place with the new algorithm.  So rather than thinking of search in terms of just the keywords given, Google can now look for meaning behind the words that you enter in your search query. In my last post on the subject I talked about a couple searching out a dining experience and how rather than plugging in just words like ‘Steakhouse’ or ‘Chicago,’ they would today look to plug in ‘Where can we get a great steak in Chicago?’” Read more

A Look Inside The New York Times’ TimesMachine

nytAdrienne Lafrance of The Atlantic reports, “One of the tasks the human brain best performs is identifying patterns. We’re so hardwired this way, researchers have found, that we sometimes invent repetitions and groupings that aren’t there as a way to feel in control. Pattern recognition is, of course, a skill computers have, too. And machines can group data at scales and with speeds unlike anything a human brain might attempt. It’s what makes computers so powerful and so useful. And seeing the structural framework for patterns across vast systems of categorization can be enormously revealing, too.” Read more

How the Internet of Things is Delivering Smarter Choices

8528725328_ffe4ba4283Sarah Austin, founder of Peak Energies recently wrote for Forbes, “The Valley bubble seems obsessed with the Internet of Things. Things are getting smarter. Devices talk to each other and people are now starting to talk to them. Things are evolving to make decisions, gather information and just take care of stuff for us. For a lot of people, it sounds too crazy. But we already benefit from the start of this shift. Take a Thai restaurant for example. You ask your phone to find you nearby Thai food, and it gives you a list of options. But why doesn’t it filter out obviously bad ones? Or determine that it only need show the closest location of the restaurant chain, and that if two places have a nearly identical menu, but one is 20 percent more expensive and a mile further away, it shouldn’t come up in your immediate results? This is the future of tech. As humans, we want choices, but we don’t want 100 choices. Read more

What’s The Word On Enterprise Search?

Photo Credit: Sean MacEntee/ Flickr

Photo Credit: Sean MacEntee/ Flickr

Context is king – at least when it comes to enterprise search. “Organizations are no longer satisfied with a list of search results — they want the single best result,” wrote Gartner in its latest Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Search report, released in mid-July. The report also says that the research firm estimates the enterprise search market to reach $2.6 billion in 2017.

The leaders list this time around includes Google with its Search Appliance, which Google touts as benefitting from Google.com’s continually evolving technology, thanks to machine learning from billions of search queries. Also on that part of the quadrant is HP Autonomy, which Gartner says is “exceptionally good at handling searches driven by queries that include surmised or contextual information;”  and Coveo and Perceptive Software, both of which are quoted as offering “considerable flexibility for the design of conversational search capabilities, to reduce the ambiguity of results.”

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