Posts Tagged ‘Semantic Startup Competition’

AppCrawlr App Discovery Service Goes More Mobile

rsz_app4AppCrawlr, the semantic mobile app discovery and recommendation service, is adding Windows Phone apps to its iOS and Android app-finder solution. The service, which debuted earlier this year (see our story here), has at its heart the TipSense content discovery and knowledge extraction technology, which also lies behind the company’s DishTip food discovery service.

Microsoft has been trying to pick up some steam in the mobile phone market, acquiring Nokia’s phone business for $7.2 billion in September and this month announcing Update 3 of Windows Phone 8 that supports faster processors and larger screens. Its market share has grown, according to Gartner, to 3.3 percent worldwide, to put it in the #3 smartphone slot. Gartner also noted, though, that Microsoft has work to do to grow interest among app developers.

Microsoft recently calculated more than 100,000 apps in the Windows app store. Though that’s far less than what you can find in the iPhone App Store – which reportedly boasts something along the lines of 1,000,000 – it’s still nice to have some help to find what you really want among tens of thousands of apps. From every app detail page, users can search on a single platform or to find across Windows Phone, iOS, and Android operating systems.

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A Closer Look At SemTechBiz Startup Competition Winner: KnowMED And Its Clinical Discovery Platform

KnowMED walked away the big winner of the Semantic Start-Up Competition. The Semantic Web Blog caught up with CTO Matthew Vagnoni, MS, and CEO Jerry D. Scott to further discuss the company’s winning entry, the Clinical Discovery Platform, for helping the health care sector semantically integrate data and ask natural language questions of that data, to support clinical research and complex decision-making.

The problem that the health care industry at large faces of not being able to easily and efficiently integrate and share data across organizations’ borders is equally a challenge right within the institutions themselves. “Large modern health care organizations are somewhat insular,” says Vagnoni.

At Medical City Children’s Hospital in Dallas, as an example, there are three separate electronic health record systems just for its neonatal division. The diverse formats and vocabularies made it difficult to try to ask questions of this data for research or efficiency purposes. But within two months of deploying KnowMED’s Clinical Discovery Platform, Vagnoni says, most of the data was integrated into a single view, “so clinicians could interact with it almost like using Google. …We combined the data from all the different sources so that clinicians could go in and ask questions [that reflect] how they think, not how [the information] is in the data schema.”

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