Posts Tagged ‘Semantic Web’

The Four Top Search Providers Unite to Talk Semantic Web

schema dot org logoMark Albertson of the Examiner recently wrote, “It was an unusual sight to be sure. Standing on a convention center stage together were computer engineers from the four largest search providers in the world (Google, Yahoo, Microsoft Bing, and Yandex). Normally, this group couldn’t even agree on where to go for dinner, but this week in San Jose, California they were united by a common cause: the Semantic Web… At the Semantic Technology and Business Conference is San Jose this week, researchers from around the world gathered to discuss how far they have come and the mountain of work still ahead of them.” Read more

New Opps For Libraries And Vendors Open Up In BIBFRAME Transition

semtechbiz-10th-125sqOpportunities are opening up in the library sector, both for the institutions themselves and providers whose solutions and services can expand in that direction.

These vistas will be explored in a session hosted by Kevin Ford, digital project coordinator at the Library of Congress at next week’s Semantic Technology & Business conference in San Jose. The door is being opened by the Bibliographic Framework Initiative (BIBFRAME) that the LOC launched a few years ago. Libraries will be moving from the MARC standards, their lingua franca for representing and communicating bibliographic and related information in machine-readable form, to BIBFRAME, which models bibliographic data in RDF using semantic technologies.

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A Look At LOD2 Project Accomplishments

lod2pixIf you’re interested in Linked Data, no doubt you’re planning to listen in on next week’s Semantic Web Blog webinar, Getting Started With The Linked Data Platform (register here), featuring Arnaud Le Hors, Linked Data Standards Lead at IBM and chair of the W3C Linked Data Platform WG and the OASIS OSLC Core TC. It also may be on your agenda to attend this month’s Semantic Web Technology & Business Conference, where speakers including Le Hors, Manu Sporny, Sandro Hawke, and others will be presenting Linked Data-focused sessions.

In the meantime, though, you might enjoy reviewing the results of the LOD2 Project, the European Commission co-funded effort whose four-year run, begun in 2010, aimed at advancing RDF data management; extracting, creating and enriching structured RDF data; interlinking data from different sources; and authoring, exploring and visualizing Linked Data. To that end, why not take a stroll through the recently released Linked Open Data – Creating Knowledge Out of Interlinked Data, edited by LOD2 Project participants Soren Auer of the Institut für Informatik III Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität; Volha Bryl of the University of Mannheim, and Sebastian Tramp of the University of Leipzig?

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SPARQL And NoSQL: A Match On Many Levels

site-header-10th-blog-304x200Is SPARQL the SQL for NoSQL? The question will be discussed at this month’s Semantic Technology & Business Conference in San Jose by Arthur Keen, vp of solution architecture of startup SPARQL City.

It’s not the first time that the industry has considered common database query languages for NoSQL (see this story at our sister site Dataversity.net for some perspective on that). But as Keen sees it, SPARQL has the legs for the job. “What I know about SPARQL is that for every database [SQL and NoSQL alike] out there, someone has tried to put SPARQL on it,” he says, whereas other common query language efforts may be limited in database support. A factor in SPARQL’s favor is query portability across NoSQL systems. Additionally, “you can achieve much higher performance using declarative query languages like SPARQL because they specify the ‘What’ and not the ‘How’ of the query, allowing optimizers to choose the best way to implement the query,” he explains.

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What’s The Word On Enterprise Search?

Photo Credit: Sean MacEntee/ Flickr

Photo Credit: Sean MacEntee/ Flickr

Context is king – at least when it comes to enterprise search. “Organizations are no longer satisfied with a list of search results — they want the single best result,” wrote Gartner in its latest Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Search report, released in mid-July. The report also says that the research firm estimates the enterprise search market to reach $2.6 billion in 2017.

The leaders list this time around includes Google with its Search Appliance, which Google touts as benefitting from Google.com’s continually evolving technology, thanks to machine learning from billions of search queries. Also on that part of the quadrant is HP Autonomy, which Gartner says is “exceptionally good at handling searches driven by queries that include surmised or contextual information;”  and Coveo and Perceptive Software, both of which are quoted as offering “considerable flexibility for the design of conversational search capabilities, to reduce the ambiguity of results.”

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Cognitive Computing And Semantic Technology: When Worlds Connect

ccimageIn mid-July Dataversity.net, the sister site of The Semantic Web Blog, hosted a webinar on Understanding The World of Cognitive Computing. Semantic technology naturally came up during the session, which was moderated by Steve Ardire, an advisor to cognitive computing, artificial intelligence, and machine learning startups. You can find a recording of the event here.

Here, you can find a more detailed discussion of the session at large, but below are some excerpts related to how the worlds of cognitive computing and semantic technology interact.

One of the panelists, IBM Big Data Evangelist James Kobielus, discussed his thinking around what’s missing from general discussions of cognitive computing to make it a reality. “How do we normally perceive branches of AI, and clearly the semantic web and semantic analysis related to natural language processing and so much more has been part of the discussion for a long time,” he said. When it comes to finding the sense in multi-structured – including unstructured – content that might be text, audio, images or video, “what’s absolutely essential is that as you extract the patterns you are able to tag the patterns, the data, the streams, really deepen the metadata that gets associated with that content and share that metadata downstream to all consuming applications so that they can fully interpret all that content, those objects…[in] whatever the relevant context is.”

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How GS1 is Shaping eCommerce in the Semantic Web

gs1Andrew Osborne, CTO of GS1 UK recently shared an overview of how the non-profit is leveraging the Semantic Web to improve customer experiences. He writes, “For those of you unfamiliar with what GS1 actually does, we are a not-for-profit standards development organisation. Put simply, our role is to define data structures and how these are used to identify things, a role we have been performing since the 1970s. We provide a series of ‘keys’ for industry which identify various types of entity (products, locations, assets and so on) and which have highly developed allocation rules. We have also defined product attributes for bar coding (the application identifier standards), have over 1,000 product attributes defined for synchronisation in the Global Data Synchronisation Network and an extensive Global Product Classification that is used to categorise products. For visibility systems we have a standard ‘Core Business Vocabulary.’ “ Read more

AlphaSense’s Advanced Linguistics Search Engine Could Buy Back Time For Financial Analysts To Do More In-Depth Research

alpha1When Raj Neervannan, CTO and co-founder of financial search engine company AlphaSense, thinks about search, he thinks about it “as a killer app that is only growing…..People want answers, not noise. They want to ask more intelligent questions and get to the next level of computer-aided intelligence.”

For AlphaSense’s customers – analysts at large investment firms and banks or any other industry, as well as one-person shops – that means search needs to get them out of ferreting through piles of research docs for the nuggets of information they really need. Neervannan knows the pain of trying to interpret a CEO’s commentary to understand what he or she was really saying when making the point that numbers were going down when referring to inventory turns. (Jack Kokko, former analyst at Morgan Stanley, is AlphaSense’s other co-founder.)

“You are essentially digging through sets of documents [using keyword search], finding locations of terms, pulling them in piece by piece and constructing a case as to what the company’s inventory turn was really like – what other companies’ similar information was, how that matches up. You have to do quantitative analysis and benchmarks, and it can take weeks,” he says.

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Vacation Time: More Summer Fun With Semantic Tech

volcpixEarlier this week we took a look at how semantic technology can play into your summer outdoor living plans. Today, we’ll spend a little time looking into how semtech-based solutions could factor into your summer vacation plans.

Perhaps the latest advancement on that front was the work we reported on last week from Sabre, which launched a new developer portal to with APIs based around semantic algorithms that should lead to more personalized travel search services. But while we’re waiting for developers to glom on, there are some other fun ways to explore your holiday options, some of which you might not immediately think of as particularly germaine to the task.

Take, for example, semantic web site creation platform Silk. There are a universe of Silks that have been built that might whet your appetite for a more radical vacation than perhaps you were originally thinking of – or at least better prepare you for an adventure vacation you have in mind. There’s The Volcanoes Catalogue, for instance, with collections of information on all 1,551 known volcanoes. Using data from the Smithsonian Institution and the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, it plots the 50 highest volcanoes; categorizes them by type; and clues you into which are the most active; which have the highest volcano explosivity index (VEI), which rates eruptions based on the volume of product exploded and the cloud height; and which have caused the most casualties, among other features – all information that might be useful in matching your tolerance for risk and danger against your desire to experience steaming craters, hot lava and active eruptions up close.

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Take Cognitive Computing To The Masses

ianCognitive computing vendor Saffron Technology is thinking about how to bring cognitive computing to the masses. Chief product officer Ian Hersey mentioned in this Dataversity article – which describes Saffron’s take on cognitive computing – the desire to “democratize” the technology. How?

“One thing we see at Saffron is getting this technology out through various partnerships,” Hersey says. “But we need to make the technology approachable, and in the early market the key is to build some apps around it that will make this technology very easy to use and solve particular business problems at hand in a way they weren’t solved before.”

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