Posts Tagged ‘Semantic Web’

WEBINAR: Yosemite Project – Part 5 (VIDEO)

WEBINAR: The Yosemite Project PART 5 --  Introduction and RDF Representation of FHIR for Clinical Data“Introduction and RDF Representation of FHIR for Clinical Data”

 

In case you missed last Friday’s webinar, Yosemite Project Part 5 “Introduction and RDF Representation of FHIR for Clinical Data” delivered by Josh Mandel, the recording and slides are now available (and posted below). The webinar was co-produced by SemanticWeb.com and DATAVERSITY.net and runs for one hour, including a Q&A session with the audience that attended the live broadcast.

If you watch this webinar, please use the comments section below to share your questions, comments, and ideas for webinars you would like to see in the future.

About the Webinar

In our series on The Yosemite Project, we explore RDF as a data standard for health data. In this presentation, we hear from Joshua Mandel, a physician and software engineer affiliated with Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Josh will provide a lightning tour of Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR), an emerging clinical data standard, with a focus on its resource-oriented approach, and a discussion of how FHIR intersects with the Semantic Web. We’ll look at how FHIR represents links between entities; how FHIR represents concepts from standards-based vocabularies; and how a set of FHIR instance data can be represented in RDF.

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Semantic Web Developer Challenge: We Have A Winner And Runners-Up Too

xsblogoThe results of the Semantic Web Developer Challenge, co-sponsored by XSB and SemanticWeb.com and launched at this summer’s Semantic Technology and Business Conference, are in: The $5,000 prizewinner was a team of two, Greg Varga and Siraj Bawa,  from Vanderbilt University. There were two runners-up: One was a team from Stony Brook University, comprised of Mrinal.Priyadarshi, Anurag Choudhary, and Paul Fodor, and the other was Roman Sova from consulting firm Good Monster.

The aim of the Challenge was to build sourcing and product life cycle management applications leveraging XSB’s PartLink Data Model, which the company developed as a project for the Department of Defense Rapid Innovation Fund. The model uses semantic web technology to create a coherent Linked Data model for all part information in the Department of Defense’s supply chain – which includes about 40 million component parts, their manufacturers and suppliers, materials, technical characteristics and more.

The large collection of engineering product information has potential beyond DoD use alone. “The current size of the Part Link triple store is well over a billion triples — maybe 1.3 billion,” says Alberto Cassola, vp sales and marketing at XSB. “For the industrial sector it may very well be one of the largest efforts of its kind.”

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Image Matters Selected To Support NGA’s Accelerating Map of the World Initiative

Image MattersNovember 24, 2014 – The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) recently awarded Image Matters LLC a contract to address some of the agency’s most pressing challenges through its Accelerating Map of the World Initiative. This initiative will deliver innovative solutions that expedite and strengthen the agency’s Map of the World (MoW). MoW is foundational to the Intelligence Community’s object-based production environment. MoW will provide easy access to an expanded web of integrated intelligence (content within context), grounded by authoritative geospatial features, for everyday decision makers, operational users, and intelligence analysts. Read more

What’s Next for the W3C?

W3C LogoJack Schofield of ZDnet recently wrote, “HTML 5.1 is well under way and should become a Recommendation in 2016, and a first working draft of HTML 5.2 is expected next year. In sum, HTML 5 will continue for some time, and I don’t see any prospect of an HTML 6. However, there are clearly lots of things that don’t fit under the HTML 5 umbrella, even the broad version that subsumes separate but associated things like CSS. How will those be developed, and what will the new project be called?” Read more

Big Data, the Semantic Web, and Enterprise Content Management

ecmAnand Srinivasan of Smart Data Collective recently wrote, “There has been talk about the arrival of Web 3.0 –the semantic web – for quite some time now. There is already a lot of progress here with the implementation of things like the RDF schema and the semantic web stacks. The approach so far has been top-down with standardization tools introduced and webmasters being asked to implement them on their websites. However, a truly semantic web may not be possible unless there is a desperate need for businesses to implement them on their websites. And that, in my opinion, is going to come from the evolution of the enterprise content management (ECM) industry. ECM, for the uninitiated, comprises of the technologies, methods and tools that are used by businesses to organize and store their organization’s documents.” Read more

Web Components: Even Better With Semantic Markup

W3C LogoThe W3C’s Web Components model is positioned to solve many of the problems that beset web developers today. “Developers are longing for the ability to have reusable, declarative, expressive components,” says Brian Sletten, a specialist in semantic web and next-generation technologies, software architecture, API design, software development and security, and data science, and president of software consultancy Bosatsu Consulting, Inc.

Web Components should fulfill that longing: With Templates, Custom Elements, Shadow DOM, and Imports draft specifications (and thus still subject to change), developers get a set of specifications for creating their web applications and elements as a set of reusable components. While most browsers don’t yet support these specifications, there are Web Component projects like Polymer that enable developers who want to start taking advantage of these capabilities right away to build Web objects and applications atop the specs today.

“With this kind of structure in place, now there is a market for people to create components that can be reused across any HTML-based application or document,” Sletten says. “There will be an explosion of people building reusable components so that you and I can use those elements and don’t have to write a ton of obnoxious JavaScript to do certain things.”

That in itself is exciting, Sletten says, but even more so is the connection he made that semantic markup can be added to any web component.

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Better Cloud Storage is About Search, Not Big Data

MarkLogicMark Albertson of The Gospel Herald recently wrote, “Much of the conversation surrounding the cloud storage industry today is centered on managing the demands of big data. Yet the real story may well be how cloud technology vendors are moving to better search and organize the vast amount of data collected by Fortune 500 companies on a daily basis, and the potential problems this trend may cause for cloud storage firms such as Box or Dropbox. One of the companies at the front line of ‘smarter data’ as opposed to just ‘big data’ is MarkLogic, a database company based in San Carlos, California, who has been working with major global firms since 2001 to improve search and draw valuable meaning from the data being collected, a process often referred to as working within the semantic Web.” Read more

Nova Spivack Weighs In On an Open Standard for Cards

9739012031_1fe744c999_nNova Spivack, CEO of Bottlenose, recently opined in TechCrunch, “Cards are fast becoming the hot new design paradigm for mobile apps, but their importance goes far beyond mobile. Cards are modular, bite-sized content containers designed for easy consumption and interaction on small screens, but they are also a new metaphor for user-interaction that is spreading across all manner of other apps and content. The concept of cards emerged from the stream — the short content notifications layer of the Internet — which has been evolving since the early days of RSS, Atom and social media.” Read more

How the Semantic Web Will Change News

Old NewsPaul Sparrow of AJR.org recently wrote, “In his book ‘Weaving the Web,’ Tim Berners-Lee described the semantic web. ‘I have a dream for the Web [in which computers] become capable of analyzing all the data on the Web — the content, links, and transactions between people and computers. A ‘Semantic Web,’ which makes this possible, has yet to emerge, but when it does, the day-to-day mechanisms of trade, bureaucracy and our daily lives will be handled by machines talking to machines. The ‘intelligent agents’ people have touted for ages will finally materialize.’ The question is, will the provider of that customized information be a media company or a technology company? A new wave of change is sweeping the media landscape, and news organizations will need to make radical changes if they want to survive this tsunami of media transformation.” Read more

Web Payments Interest Group Takes Flight

w3cdomainThe World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has launched an initiative to integrate payments seamlessly into the Open Web Platform, the collection of open technologies such as HTML, HTTP, and various APIs that enable the Web. It’s asking for industry stakeholders, such as banks, credit card companies, governments and others, to join the new Web Payments Interest Group, chaired by Erik Anderson (Bloomberg) and David Ezell (Association for Convenience & Fuel Retailing), to help deepen understanding of challenges and how to meet them with the appropriate solutions to move e-commerce forward, including on mobile devices.

The Interest Group’s goals include improving usability across devices and reducing the risk of fraud, as well as creating new opportunities for businesses and consumers in areas such as coupons and loyalty programs and crypto-currencies. On its agenda is creating a Web Payments Roadmap, determining Web Payments terminology, dealing with payment transaction messaging and identity, authentication and security. As part of its work, the new group is charged with creating a framework to ensure that Web applications can interface in standard ways with all current and future payment methods, and will encompass the full range of devices people use for online payments.

First up, the W3C says, is a focus on digital wallets, “which many in industry consider an effective way to reduce fraud and improve privacy by having users share sensitive information only with payment providers, rather than merchants,” according to the release. “In addition, wallets can simplify transactions from mobile devices and make it easier to integrate new payment innovations.”

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