Posts Tagged ‘Sentiment Analysis Symposium’

Alta Plana Takes The Pulse Of Text Analytics

wordcloudSeth Grimes, president and principal consultant of Alta Plana Corp. and founding chair of the Sentiment Analysis Symposium, has put together a thorough new report, Text Analytics 2014: User Perspectives on Solutions and Providers. Among the interesting findings of the report is that “growth in text analytics, as a vendor market category, has slackened, even while adoption of text analytics, as a technique, has continued to expand rapidly.”

Grimes explains that in a fragmented market, consisting of everything from text analytics services to solution-embedded technologies, the opportunities for users to practice text analytics is strong, but that increasingly text analytics is not the main focal point of the solutions being leveraged.

Reflecting the diversity of options, respondents listed among their providers a number of open-source offerings such as Apache OpenNLP and GATE, API services such as AlchemyAPI and Semantria, and enterprise software solution and business suite providers like SAP. The word cloud above was generated by Alta Plana at Wordle.net to show how users responded to the question of companies they know provide text/content analytics functionality. Nearly 50 percent of users are likely to recommend their most important provider.

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Take Sentiment Analytics And Make It Better, Better, Better, Better, Better, Oh

hjThere’s room for improvement in sentiment and text analytics technology: Greater reliability, more accessibility, and increased businesss actionability should be on the agenda.

“There are still tools that are crashing in the middle of a brand crisis or there’s not adequate support or there’s no integration with other tools that need the data,” Chris Boudreaux, global lead, social media and text analytics at Accenture, told an audience gathered at last week’s Sentiment Analysis Symposium. “The industry has to grow up and be more accountable in delivering tools and services.”

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Cruxly Analytics Technology Drives Actions From Intents

Image courtesy: Flickr/ M4D GROUP

Image courtesy: Flickr/ M4D GROUP

What are your customers – or potential clients – saying or asking online, often in short texts and streaming posts, or in emails about your products, services, or their own particular interests or desires? If you can understand their actionable intents in realtime, then you have a good shot at responding swiftly and appropriately to those expressed intents, requests, or queries. That could add up to new sales, new customers, and better marketing and product management.

Startup Cruxly, which is presenting at this week’s Sentiment Analysis Symposium in NYC, believes it’s taking the oft-touted concept of social media monitoring in a new direction with its platform that applies natural language processing techniques for intent detection in realtime. “The idea is to be actionable,” says CEO Aloke Guha. “If it’s not actionable, at most [monitoring] is a nice-to-have [capability].”

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New York Symposium To Explore “Human Analytics” Solutions That Exploit Big Data Emotion, Connection, And Intent

ALTA PLANA CORPORATION SETH GRIMES

NEW YORK, Oct. 21, 2013 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — Big Data Analytics authority Seth Grimes has announced the seventh Sentiment Analysis Symposium, the premier conference for social intelligence and cognitive computing, slated for March 5-6, 2014 in New York.

The symposium will feature speakers and panelists from industry-leading and innovative organizations. Sessions will cover business applications that include Customer Experience Management, Consumer and Market Research, Social Media Analytics, Media and Publishing, and Financial Services as well as developments and trends in academic and industry research. Read more

When Does Customer Sentiment Matter?

Photo Courtesy: Flickr/katerha

Among the topics covered at this week’s Sentiment Analysis’ Symposium was an exploration of just how much the negative or positive expression of sentiment about a company or a product really matters – and in what context it does. (Another one, which The Semantic Web Blog covered yesterday here, looked at the expected transition from sentiment to emotions analytics.)

Augie Ray, director of social media at Prudential Financial, and formerly a social media leader at USAA and Forrester, recounted some of the bigger blow-ups online in recent years: The passenger whose guitar was broken by United Airlines and made a Youtube video that went viral; NBC’s 2012 London Olympics coverage that was criticized for dissing a tribute to the victims of terrorist bombings, among other things; and Bank of America’s being castigated for its announced plan to institute debit card fees.

“We live and die by the concept that negative sentiment matters,” he said.

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Analysis Goes From Sentiment to Emotion

What’s next in sentiment analytics? The road’s pointing to a deeper understanding of emotions.

“We still are clearly at the nascent level regarding text and sentiment analytics,” said David Rabjohns, CEO of social intelligence company MotiveQuest, speaking at yesterday’s Sentiment Analysis Symposium, the event organized by Seth Grimes’ Alta Plana Corp. “There are much higher levels of emotional depth still to be mined.”

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Semantic Tech Outlook: 2013

Photo Courtesy: Flickr/Lars Plougmann

In recent blogs we’ve discussed where semantic technologies have gone in 2012, and a bit about where they will go this year (see here, here and here).

Here are some final thoughts from our panel of semantic web experts on what to expect to see as the New Year rings in:

John Breslin,lecturer at NUI Galway, researcher and unit leader at DERI, creator of SIOC, and co-founder of Technology Voice and StreamGlider

Broader deployment of the schema.org terms is likely. In the study by Muehlisen and Bizer in July this year, we saw Open Graph Protocol, DC, FOAF, RSS, SIOC and Creative Commons still topping the ranks of top semantic vocabularies being used. In 2013 and beyond, I expect to see schema.org jump to the top of that list.

Christine Connors, Chief Ontologist, Knowledgent:

I think we will see an uptick in the job market for semantic technologists in the enterprise; primarily in the Fortune 2000. I expect to see some M&A activity as well from systems providers and integrators who recognize the desire to have a semantic component in their product suite. (No, I have no direct knowledge; it is my hunch!)

We will see increased competition from data analytics vendors who try to add RDF, OWL or graphstores to their existing platforms. I anticipate saying, at the end of 2013, that many of these immature deployments will leave some project teams disappointed. The mature vendors will need to put resources into sales and business development, with the right partners for consulting and systems integration, to be ready to respond to calls for proposals and assistance.

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Good-Bye to 2012: A Look Back At The Year In Semantic Tech, Part 1

Courtesy: Flickr/zoetnet

As we close out 2012, we’ve asked some semantic tech experts to give us their take on the year that was. Was Big Data a boon for the semantic web, or is the opportunity to capitalize on the connection still pending? Is structured data on the web not just the future but the present? What sector is taking a strong lead in the semantic web space?

We begin with Part 1, with our experts listed in alphabetical order:

John Breslin, lecturer at NUI Galway, researcher and unit leader at DERI, creator of SIOC, and co-founder of Technology Voice and StreamGlider:
I think the schema.org initiative really gaining community support and a broader range of terms has been fantastic. It’s been great to see an easily understandable set of terms for describing the objects in web pages, but also leveraging the experience of work like GoodRelations rather than ignoring what has gone before. It’s also been encouraging to see the growth of Drupal 7 (which produces RDFa data) in the government sector: Estimates are that 24 percent of .gov CMS sites are now powered by Drupal.

Martin Böhringer, CEO & Co-Founder Hojoki:

For us it was very important to see Jena, our Semantic Web framework, becoming an Apache top-level project in April 2012. We see a lot of development pace in this project recently and see a chance to build an open source Semantic Web foundation which can handle cutting-edge requirements.

Still disappointing is the missing link between Semantic Web and the “cool” technologies and buzzwords. From what we see Semantic Web gives answers to some of the industry’s most challenging problems, but it still doesn’t seem to really find its place in relation to the cloud or big data (Hadoop).

Christine Connors, Chief Ontologist, Knowledgent:

One trend that I have seen is increased interest in the broader spectrum of semantic technologies in the enterprise. Graph stores, NoSQL, schema-less and more flexible systems, ontologies (& ontologists!) and integration with legacy systems. I believe the Big Data movement has had a positive impact on this field. We are hearing more and more about “Big Data Analytics” from our clients, partners and friends. The analytical power brought to bear by the semantic technology stack is sparking curiosity – what is it really? How can these models help me mitigate risk, more accurately predict outcomes, identify hidden intellectual assets, and streamline business processes? Real questions, tough questions: fun challenges!

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Financial Services In The Spotlight At Sentiment Analysis Symposium

The financial services sector was in focus at this week’s Sentiment Analysis Symposium in New York City, which is organized and produced by Alta Plana Corp. and its founder, Seth Grimes.  Take, for example, the presentation by Rich Brown, head of Elektron Analytics at Thomson Reuters, who disclosed that the company is about to launch market response indicators in support of its Thomson Reuters News Analytics system for the financial community. That product this week also won The Technical Analyst’s 2012 award for best news analytics software.

With its software, originally discussed here, qualitative, unstructured information is turned into a quantitative data set allowing users – machines and humans – to quickly analyze thousands of news stories in less time than it takes to read a single headline, as Thomson Reuters describes it. It uses natural language processing technology to get to the end game, which is to forecast financial market response from news and social media sentiment. Some 82 fields of metadata come into play for automating the analysis of news content. That encompasses sentiment down through to the degree of positive, negative or neutral expressions and how individual companies mentioned in a piece fare in those respects – rather than just the tone of the piece at large. “The computational linguistics system measures the author’s tone as positive or negative on any given entity, which is important and the harder part of it,” Brown said. Other fields include, for example, relevance, genre, intensity of news flow, and more.

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Working Out the Kinks In Sentiment Analysis — And Focusing on the Opportunities, Too

What’s the most important requirement for sentiment analytics to succeed? Make that question plural, and let’s start our answers with something that the tools in this area themselves have no influence on: Good quality data.

During yesterday’s second annual Sentiment Analysis Symposium in New York City, hosted by Alta Plana Corp. and its founder Seth Grimes, the audience got an earful about how bad data can negatively impact efforts to understand sentiment  before they even get underway.

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