Posts Tagged ‘SKOS’

Cognitum Ontology Editor Amps Up Analytical Computations and Collaborative Knowledge Editing

fluenteditorlogoThe end of the month should see the release of an update to Cognitum’s Fluent Editor 2014 ontology editor, which will bring with it new capabilities to further drive its usage not only in academia but also in industrial segments such as energy, pharmaceuticals and more.

The company is including among its additions the ability to run analytical computations over ontologies with the open source language R and its Controlled Natural Language. What has been lacking when it comes to performing computations over Big Data sets, says CEO Paweł Zarzycki, is some shortcut to easily combine the semantic and numerical worlds. R is great for doing statistical analysis over huge sets of numerical data, he says, but more knowledge opens up when Cognitum’s language is leveraged for analysis in a qualitative way.

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Retrieving and Using Taxonomy Data from DBpedia

DBpedia logo on a halloween jack-o-lanternDBpedia, as described in the recent semanticweb.com article DBpedia 2014 Announced, is “a crowd-sourced community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and make this information available on the Web.” It currently has over 3 billion triples (that is, facts stored using the W3C standard RDF data model) available for use by applications, making it a cornerstone of the semantic web.

A surprising amount of this data is expressed using the SKOS vocabulary, the W3C standard model for taxonomies used by the Library of Congress, the New York Times, and many other organizations to publish their taxonomies and subject headers. (semanticweb.com has covered SKOS many times in the past.) DBpedia has data about over a million SKOS concepts, arranged hierarchically and ready for you to pull down with simple queries so that you can use them in your RDF applications to add value to your own content and other data.

Where is this taxonomy data in DBpedia?

Many people think of DBpedia as mostly storing the fielded “infobox” information that you see in the gray boxes on the right side of Wikipedia pages—for example, the names of the founders and the net income figures that you see on the right side of the Wikipedia page for IBM. If you scroll to the bottom of that page, you’ll also see the categories that have been assigned to IBM in Wikipedia such as “Companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange” and “Computer hardware companies.” The Wikipedia page for Computer hardware companies lists companies that fall into this category, as well as two other interesting sets of information: subcategories (or, in taxonomist parlance, narrower categories) such as “Computer storage companies” and “Fabless semiconductor companies,” and then, at the bottom of the page, categories that are broader than “Computer hardware companies” such as “Computer companies” and “Electronics companies.”

How does DBpedia store this categorization information? The DBpedia page for IBM shows that DBpedia includes triples saying that IBM has Dublin Core subject values such as category:Companies_listed_on_the_New_York_Stock_Exchange and category:Computer_hardware_companies. The DBpedia page for the category Computer_hardware_companies shows that is a SKOS concept with values for the two key properties of a SKOS concept: a preferred label and broader values. The category:Computer_hardware_companies concept is itself the broader value of several other concepts such as category:Fabless_semiconductor_companies. Because it’s the broader value of other concepts and has its own broader values, it can be both a parent node and a child node in a tree of taxonomic terms, so DBpedia has the data that lets you build a taxonomy hierarchy around any of its categories.

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A Look At LOD2 Project Accomplishments

lod2pixIf you’re interested in Linked Data, no doubt you’re planning to listen in on next week’s Semantic Web Blog webinar, Getting Started With The Linked Data Platform (register here), featuring Arnaud Le Hors, Linked Data Standards Lead at IBM and chair of the W3C Linked Data Platform WG and the OASIS OSLC Core TC. It also may be on your agenda to attend this month’s Semantic Web Technology & Business Conference, where speakers including Le Hors, Manu Sporny, Sandro Hawke, and others will be presenting Linked Data-focused sessions.

In the meantime, though, you might enjoy reviewing the results of the LOD2 Project, the European Commission co-funded effort whose four-year run, begun in 2010, aimed at advancing RDF data management; extracting, creating and enriching structured RDF data; interlinking data from different sources; and authoring, exploring and visualizing Linked Data. To that end, why not take a stroll through the recently released Linked Open Data – Creating Knowledge Out of Interlinked Data, edited by LOD2 Project participants Soren Auer of the Institut für Informatik III Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität; Volha Bryl of the University of Mannheim, and Sebastian Tramp of the University of Leipzig?

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A Closer Look At SemTechBiz Startup Competition Winner: KnowMED And Its Clinical Discovery Platform

KnowMED walked away the big winner of the Semantic Start-Up Competition. The Semantic Web Blog caught up with CTO Matthew Vagnoni, MS, and CEO Jerry D. Scott to further discuss the company’s winning entry, the Clinical Discovery Platform, for helping the health care sector semantically integrate data and ask natural language questions of that data, to support clinical research and complex decision-making.

The problem that the health care industry at large faces of not being able to easily and efficiently integrate and share data across organizations’ borders is equally a challenge right within the institutions themselves. “Large modern health care organizations are somewhat insular,” says Vagnoni.

At Medical City Children’s Hospital in Dallas, as an example, there are three separate electronic health record systems just for its neonatal division. The diverse formats and vocabularies made it difficult to try to ask questions of this data for research or efficiency purposes. But within two months of deploying KnowMED’s Clinical Discovery Platform, Vagnoni says, most of the data was integrated into a single view, “so clinicians could interact with it almost like using Google. …We combined the data from all the different sources so that clinicians could go in and ask questions [that reflect] how they think, not how [the information] is in the data schema.”

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Time To Take On A Taxonomy: Pingar Customizes and Automates The Task

There’s more than one way to get a taxonomy. A company can go out and buy one for its industry, for instance, but the risk is that the terms may not relate to how it talks about content in its own organization, and the hierarchy may not be the right fit either. That sets up two potential outcomes, says Chris Riley, VP of marketing at Pingar: You wind up having to customize it, or with users who just ignore it.

It’s possible to build one, but that’s a big job and a costly one, too – especially for many enterprises, where there hasn’t traditionally been a focus on structuring content and so the skills to do it aren’t necessarily there. While industries like publishing, oil and gas, life sciences, and pharma have that bent, many other verticals do not. In fact, Riley notes, they may realize they have a content organization problem, but not that what they’d benefit from to address it even goes by the name ‘taxonomy.’

Pingar’s looking to help out those enterprises that want to bring organization to their content, whether or not they’re familiar with the concept of a taxonomy. It just launched its automated Taxonomy Generator Service that uses an organization’s own content to build a taxonomy that mirrors its own way of talking about things and its understanding of relationships between child and parent terms.

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EventMedia Live, Winner of ISWC Semantic Web Challenge, Starts New Project With Nokia Maps, Extends Architecture Flexibility

The winner of the Semantic Web Challenge at November’s International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC) was EventMedia Live, a web-based environment that exploits real-time connections to event and media sources to deliver rich content describing events that are associated with media, and interlinked with the Linked Data cloud.

This week, it will begin a one-year effort under a European Commission-funded project to align its work with the Nokia Maps database of places, so that mobile users of the app can quickly get pictures of these venues that were taken by users with EventMedia’s help.

A project of EURECOM, a consortium combining seven European universities and nine international industrial partners, EventMedia Live has its origins in the “mismatch between those sites specializing in announcing upcoming events and those other sites where users share photos, videos and document those events,” explains Raphaël Troncy, assistant professor at the EURECOM: School of Engineering & Research CenterMultimedia Communications, and one of the project’s leaders.

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Good-Bye to 2012: Continuing Our Look Back At The Year In Semantic Tech

Courtesy: Flickr/LadyDragonflyCC <3

Yesterday we began our look back at the year in semantic technology here. Today we continue with more expert commentary on the year in review:

Ivan Herman, W3C Semantic Web Activity Lead:

I would mention two things (among many, of course).

  •  Schema.org had an important effect on semantic technologies. Of course, it is controversial (role of one major vocabulary and its relations to others, the community discussions on the syntax, etc.), but I would rather concentrate on the positive aspects. A few years ago the topic of discussion was whether having ‘structured data’, as it is referred to (I would simply say having RDF in some syntax or other), as part of a Web page makes sense or not. There were fairly passionate discussions about this and many were convinced that doing that would not make any sense, there is no use case for it, authors would not use it and could not deal with it, etc. Well, this discussion is over. Structured data in Web sites is here to stay, it is important, and has become part of the Web landscape. Schema.org’s contribution in this respect is very important; the discussions and disagreements I referred to are minor and transient compared to the success. And 2012 was the year when this issue was finally closed.
  •  On a very different aspect (and motivated by my own personal interest) I see exciting moves in the library and the digital publishing world. Many libraries recognize the power of linked data as adopted by libraries, of the value of standard cataloging techniques well adapted to linked data, of the role of metadata, in the form of linked data, adopted by journals and soon by electronic books… All these will have a profound influence bringing a huge amount of very valuable data onto the Web of Data, linking to sources of accumulated human knowledge. I have witnessed different aspects of this evolution coming to the fore in 2012, and I think this will become very important in the years to come.

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Introduction to: SKOS

Nametag: "Hello, my name is SKOS"SKOS, which stands for Simple Knowledge Organization System, is a W3C standard, based on other Semantic Web standards (RDF and OWL), that provides a way to represent controlled vocabularies, taxonomies and thesauri. Specifically, SKOS itself is an OWL ontology and it can be written out in any RDF syntax.

Before we dive into SKOS, what is the difference between Controlled Vocabulary, Taxonomy and Thesaurus?

controlled vocabulary is a list of terms which a community or organization has agreed upon. For example: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday are the days of the week.

taxonomy is a controlled vocabulary organized in a hierarchy. For example, we can have the terms Computer, Tablet and Laptop and the concepts Tablet and Laptop are subclasses of Computer because a Tablet and Laptop are types of Computers.

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SemanticWeb.com “Innovation Spotlight” Interview with Andreas Blumauer, CEO of Semantic Web Company

If you would like your company to be considered for an interview please email editor[ at ]semanticweb[ dot ]com.

In this segment of our “Innovation Spotlight” we spoke with Andreas Blumauer, the CEO of  Semantic Web Company. Semantic Web Company is headquartered in Vienna, Austria and their software extracts meaning from big data using linked data technologies. In this interview Andreas describes some of the their core products to us in more detail.

Sean: Hi Andreas. Can you give us a little background on your company? When did you get started in the Semantic Web?

Andreas: As an offspring of a ‘typical’ web agency from the early days of the internet, we became a specialized provider in 2004: The ‘Semantic Web School’ focused on research, consulting and training in the area of the semantic web. We learned quickly how the idea of a ‘semantic web’ was able to trigger a lot of great project visions but also, that most of the tools from the early days of the semantic web were rather scary for enterprises. In 2007 we experienced that information professionals began to search for grown-up semantic web solutions to improve their information infrastructure. We were excited that ‘our’ main topics obviously began to play a role in the development of IT-strategies in many organizations. We refocused on the development of software and renamed our company.

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Legally Linked: Linked Open Data Principles Applied To Code Of Federal Regulations

The Legal Information Institute at Cornell University Law School is about making law accessible and understandable, for free. It’s been engaged in that mission since the early ’90s, and semantic web technology today plays a role in furthering that goal.

The organization this month published a new electronic edition of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), which contains a bevy of rules across 50 titles that impact nearly all areas of American business. Work underway at LII, dubbed the Linked Legal Data project, seeks to apply Linked Open Data principles enhances access to the CFR, with capabilities such as  being able to search its Title 21 Food and Drugs database using brand names for drugs (such as Tylenol), and receiving the generic name for the drug (acetaminophen) as a suggested term. “You cannot look for regulatory information on Tylenol in the CFR because Tylenol will never be there,” says Dr. Núria Casellas, who is a visiting scholar at the LII spearheading work on the project. “That is a brand name. What you actually want to look for are components, such as acetaminophen.”

While the general citizenry might find reasons to leverage the fruits of this effort, businesses that must comply with these requirements are a more likely target – not just the lawyers and paralegals, but those responsible for tasks, for example, such as storing and caring for products their company exports or imports, including understanding the safety regulations that apply to it. The Tylenol-acetaminophen example, she says, is very interesting because it showcases how using the wrong word or the incorrect approach can hamper a company from being able to find the relevant regulatory or safety information it needs to take into consideration.

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