Posts Tagged ‘social graph’

Find a Valentine Online Thanks to Graph Databases

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Dan Woods of Forbes recently wrote, “When it comes to dating, everybody is highly motivated. So it is no surprise that the nerdy among us put their advanced knowledge to work when seeking out a mate. The most recent celebrated example is Chris McKinlay, who used a statistical modeling approach to find which type of women to go after. The result: after 88 dates, McKinlay found the right woman for him, who, as it turns out, had been hacking her profile in a different way (see “How a Math Genius Hacked OkCupid to Find True Love”). But interest in applying technology to find love is also highlighting a shift toward graph database technology that is starting to transform applications in a large number of industries.” Read more

The Supply Chain Is One Big Graph In Start-up Elementum’s Platform

rsz_elementum_transport_appStartup Elementum wants to take supply chains into the 21st century. Incubated at Flextronics, the second largest contract manufacturer in the world, and launching today with $44 million in Series B funding from that company and Lightspeed Ventures, its approach is to get supply chain participants – the OEMs that generate product ideas and designs, the contract manufacturers who build to those specs, the component makers who supply the ingredients to make the product, the various logistics hubs to move finished product to market, and the retail customer – to drop the one-off relational database integrations and instead see the supply chain fundamentally as a complex graph or web of connections.

“It’s no different thematically from how Facebook thinks of its social network or how LinkedIn thinks of what it calls the economic graph,” says Tyler Ziemann, head of growth at Elementum. Built on Amazon Web Services, Elementum’s “mobile-first” apps for real-time visibility, shipment tracking and carrier management, risk monitoring and mitigation, and order collaboration have a back-end built to consume and make sense of both structured and unstructured data on-the-fly, based on a real-time Java, MongoDB NoSQL document database to scale in a simple and less expensive way across a global supply chain that fundamentally involves many trillions of records, and flexible schema graph database to store and map the nodes and edges of the supply chain graph.

“Relational database systems can’t scale to support the types of data volumes we need and the flexibility that is required for modeling the supply chain as a graph,” Ziemann says.

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Dakick Wants To Kick Event Recommendations Into High Gear

What’s the only and biggest startup in Istanbul, Turkey that’s working on the semantic web? The answer is Dakick, says co-founder and general manager Serkan Ünsal, a service for more than 100,000 members in Turkey so far that is focused on event ontologies and creating an events recommendation engine.

Users can follow people such as celebrities, venues, movies or other performing arts, and, based on the relations it’s building among entities in its growing database, be directed to shows that a followed actor is in that night on TV, for instance, or an upcoming concert featuring the work of a followed composer.

Users can select entities to follow on its service or Dakick can collect data from Facebook and Twitter accounts, too. An issue with getting people connected with the events that matter to the entities they’re interested in, however, starts with the fact that the providers sending their movie showtimes, tv schedules, exhibition, sports, trade show, conferences, performing art, and concert information Dakick’s way don’t always have a uniform perspective on data structure, if any at all, which makes interoperability a challenge.

“In Turkey content providers typically don’t know much about data structure,” says Ünsal, so Dakick is trying to educate them to move the needle here. “We are saying to all our content providers that if you agree on a data structure it will make search engines more meaningful to list some event data.”

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