Posts Tagged ‘stock market’

Thomson Reuters Brings Semantic Search to the Trading Floor

Tom Groenfeldt of Forbes reports that Thomson Reuters is bringing semantic search to market information. He writes, “Looking up Cisco results on a Thomson Reuters Eikon terminal is as simple as typing in Cis. The name will autofill and you’re there.  Just like Google. Is nowhere safe from the consumerization of IT, not even trading rooms? ‘We want to change the way people interact with financial information,’ said Philip Brittan, global head of desktop platform at Thomson Reuters. ‘We are making it more like what modern search engines, such as Google, have done in the way you search the Web and interact with Web sites putting the search bar front and center allowing users to simply input what they are looking for’.” Read more

Financial Services In The Spotlight At Sentiment Analysis Symposium

The financial services sector was in focus at this week’s Sentiment Analysis Symposium in New York City, which is organized and produced by Alta Plana Corp. and its founder, Seth Grimes.  Take, for example, the presentation by Rich Brown, head of Elektron Analytics at Thomson Reuters, who disclosed that the company is about to launch market response indicators in support of its Thomson Reuters News Analytics system for the financial community. That product this week also won The Technical Analyst’s 2012 award for best news analytics software.

With its software, originally discussed here, qualitative, unstructured information is turned into a quantitative data set allowing users – machines and humans – to quickly analyze thousands of news stories in less time than it takes to read a single headline, as Thomson Reuters describes it. It uses natural language processing technology to get to the end game, which is to forecast financial market response from news and social media sentiment. Some 82 fields of metadata come into play for automating the analysis of news content. That encompasses sentiment down through to the degree of positive, negative or neutral expressions and how individual companies mentioned in a piece fare in those respects – rather than just the tone of the piece at large. “The computational linguistics system measures the author’s tone as positive or negative on any given entity, which is important and the harder part of it,” Brown said. Other fields include, for example, relevance, genre, intensity of news flow, and more.

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