Posts Tagged ‘Summly’

Is A Knowledge Graph-Related Acquisition In Yahoo’s Future?

sdtechIs SindiceTech about to be acquired by Yahoo? Just last month The Semantic Web Blog reported on the formal relaunch of the company’s activities following the finalization of its separation from its university incubation setting at the former DERI institute in Ireland. Now, according to the Sunday Independent, Yahoo – which the article says had originally planned on buying the company late last year but saw negotiations collapse – may resume talks on the matter.

Yahoo, the article says, “refused to comment on the Sindice-Tech deal, calling it as ‘rumour and speculation.’” SindiceTech CEO Giovanni Tummarello also says that he cannot comment on this. He did note, however, that media, search and advertising are prime sectors for employing Knowledge Graphs. “In scenarios where there is much more (semi-structured) information than one knows how to leverage right away, Big Data graph-like knowledge management and moving from search to relational and entity search is a common theme these days,” he wrote in an email to The Semantic Web Blog.

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Teenager Nick D’Aloisio is Changing the Way We Read

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Seth Stevenson of The Wall Street Journal recently wrote, “Upon hearing, in March of this year, reports that a 17-year-old schoolboy had sold a piece of software to Yahoo! for $30 million, you might well have entertained a few preconceived notions about what sort of child this must be. A geeky specimen, no doubt. A savant with zero interests outside writing lines of code. A twitchy creature, prone to mumbling, averse to eye contact. Thus it’s rather a shock when you first encounter Nick D’Aloisio striding into London’s Bar Boulud restaurant, firmly shaking hands and proceeding to outline his entrepreneurial vision.” Read more

Proof That Information Is Gold: Google Buys Wavii for $30 Million

Google has scooped up news aggregation summary service Wavii for $30 million, according to Reuters. (Google and Wavii haven’t officially commented yet.) Wavii’s service has been influenced by expert machine learning natural language processing work, as explained by founder and CEO Adrian Aoun in our interview here. In February, a blog on the site also explained its use of classification for NLP tasks like disambiguating entities, automatically learning new entities and relationship extraction. Late last year Wavii announced its iPhone app.

Reports have it that Google and Apple were in a bidding war over acquiring the venture, which has been likened to Yahoo’s Summly buyout in March (see story here). TechCrunch says the Wavii team will join Google’s Knowledge Graph division.
When it comes to delivering personalized intelligence about what’s up in the world, Wavii aims to better understand users and what they’ll want to see in their feeds not just via explicit topic follows, but also via various signals. These include which other topics are involved in the events they comment on, how often they click into events about each topic, what topics they search for and what topic pages they visit. It also includes other attributes of stories they care about besides the topics, and their interest level in a topic to guess what the interest might be in related topics.

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Summly Acquired by Yahoo! for $30M – And What’s the Real Value?

John Abell of GMA News recently told the story of Summly, a company developed by 17-year-old Nick D’Aloisio and sold to Yahoo! for $30 million. Abell writes, “D’Aloisio’s youth—he’s 17—and windfall are interesting data points, even if all the work behind the magic algorithm isn’t the sole product of this high schooler’s brain. Like all really good ideas, Summly’s is simple: Anything can be summarized, but by having a computer do it,  the number of things you can summarize—and the speed with which it can be done—are massively increased. As an app, it filtered news stories and—Presto Chango!—spit out the CliffsNotes version, optimized for a smartphone’s tiny screen (and our infinitesimal attention span).” Read more