Posts Tagged ‘Tim Berners-Lee’

Tim Berners-Lee: What Kind of Internet Do We Want

timbernersleeExchange Magazine recently wrote, “Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago. So it’s worth a listen when he warns us: There’s a battle ahead. Eroding net neutrality, filter bubbles and centralizing corporate control all threaten the web’s wide-open spaces. It’s up to users to fight for the right to access and openness. The question is, What kind of Internet do we want? Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web. He leads the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), overseeing the Web’s standards and development.” Read more

HTTPA Will Let You Track How Your Private Data is Used

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Larry Hardesty of the MIT News Office reports, “By now, most people feel comfortable conducting financial transactions on the Web. The cryptographic schemes that protect online banking and credit card purchases have proven their reliability over decades. As more of our data moves online, a more pressing concern may be its inadvertent misuse by people authorized to access it. Every month seems to bring another story of private information accidentally leaked by governmental agencies or vendors of digital products or services. At the same time, tighter restrictions on access could undermine the whole point of sharing data. Coordination across agencies and providers could be the key to quality medical care; you may want your family to be able to share the pictures you post on a social-networking site.” Read more

Rewarding Improved Access to Linked Data

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A new paper out of the Semantic Web journal shares a proposed system, Five Stars of Linked Data Vocabulary Use. The paper was written by Krzysztof Janowicz, Pascal Hitzler, Benjamin Adams, Dave Kolas, and Charles Vardeman II. The abstract states, “In 2010 Tim Berners-Lee introduced a 5 star rating to his Linked Data design issues page to encourage data publishers along the road to good Linked Data. What makes the star rating so effective is its simplicity, clarity, and a pinch of psychology — is your data 5 star?” Read more

The Web Is 25 — And The Semantic Web Has Been An Important Part Of It

web25NOTE: This post was updated at 5:40pm ET.

Today the Web celebrates its 25th birthday, and we celebrate the Semantic Web’s role in that milestone. And what a milestone it is: As of this month, the Indexed Web contains at least 2.31 billion pages, according to WorldWideWebSize.  

The Semantic Web Blog reached out to the World Wide Web Consortium’s current and former semantic leads to get their perspective on the roads The Semantic Web has traveled and the value it has so far brought to the Web’s table: Phil Archer, W3C Data Activity Lead coordinating work on the Semantic Web and related technologies; Ivan Herman, who last year transitioned roles at the W3C from Semantic Activity Lead to Digital Publishing Activity Lead; and Eric Miller, co-founder and president of Zepheira and the leader of the Semantic Web Initiative at the W3C until 2007.

While The Semantic Web came to the attention of the wider public in 2001, with the publication in The Scientific American of The Semantic Web by Tim Berners-Lee, James Hendler and Ora Lassila, Archer points out that “one could argue that the Semantic Web is 25 years old,” too. He cites Berners-Lee’s March 1989 paper, Information Management: A Proposal, that includes a diagram that shows relationships that are immediately recognizable as triples. “That’s how Tim envisaged it from Day 1,” Archer says.

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Open The Door To Bringing Linked Data To Real-World Projects

ld1Linked Data: Structured Data on the Web is now available in a soft-cover edition. The book, authored by David Wood, Marsha Zaidman, Luke Ruth, and Michael Hausenblas, and with a forward by Tim Berners-Lee, aims to give mainstream developers without previous experience with Linked Data practical techniques for integrating it into real-world projects, focusing on languages with which they’re likely to be familiar, such as JavaScript and Python.

Berners-Lee’s forward gets the ball rolling in a big way, making the case for Linked Data and its critical importance in the web ecosystem:“The Web of hypertext-linked documents is complemented by the very powerful Linked Web of Data.  Why linked?  Well, think of how the value of a Web page is very much a function of what it links to, as well as the inherent value of the information within the Web page. So it is — in a way even more so — also in the Semantic Web of Linked Data.  The data itself is valuable, but the links to other data make it much more so.”

The topic has clearly struck a nerve, Wood believes, noting that today we are “at a point where structured data on the web is getting tremendous play,” from Google’s Knowledge Graph to the Facebook Open Graph protocol, to the growing use of the schema.org vocabulary, to data still growing exponentially in the Linked Open Data Project, and more. “The industry is ready to talk about data and data processing in a way it never has been before,” he continues. There’s growing realization that Linked Data fits in with and nicely complements technologies in the data science realm, such as machine learning algorithms and Hadoop, such that “you can suddenly build things you never could before with a tiny team, and that’s pretty cool….No technology is sufficient in and of itself but combine them and you can do really powerful things.”

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ODI celebrates New Year OBE for Technical Director, Jeni Tennison

Photo of Jeni TennisonThe Open Data Institute has announced that Jeni Tennison has been awarded an OBE in the “Queen’s New Year Honours.”

For those not familiar, King George V created these honors on 4 June 1917, during World War I. The honor was intended to reward services to the war effort by civilians at home in the UK and servicemen in support positions. Today, they are awarded for prominent national or regional roles and to those making distinguished or notable contributions in their own specific areas of activity. There are three ranks to the honors: Commander (CBE), Officer (OBE) and Member (MBE). Tennison is being given the OBE.

The official release reads:

Open Data Institute (ODI) founders, Sir Nigel Shadbolt and Sir Tim Berners-Lee have warmly welcomed news that the organisation’s Technical Director, Jeni Tennison has received an OBE in the Queen’s New Year Honours.

Tennison, who grew up in Cambridge, first trained as a psychologist before gaining a PhD in collaborative ontology development from the University of Nottingham.

Before joining the ODI, she was the technical architect and lead developer for legislation.gov.uk, which pioneered the use of open data APIs within the public sector, set a new standard in the publication of legislation on the web, and formed the basis of The National Archives’ strategy for bringing the UK’s legislation up to date as open, public data.

Speaking about today’s Honour, ODI Chairman, Sir Nigel Shadbolt said: “Jeni inspires affection, loyalty and admiration in all who know her. She has a special blend of deep technical know how and an intuitive sense of what works in the world of the Web. In Jeni the ODI has a fantastic CTO and the open data community a great role model. It has been a privilege to work with her for over two decades and it is wonderful to see her recognised in this way.”

Before taking up her post at the ODI, Tennison worked with Shadbolt on the early linked data work on data.gov.uk, helping to engineer new standards for the publication of statistics as linked data; building APIs for geographic, transport and education data; and supporting the publication of public sector organograms as open data.

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The Semantic Spin On YouTube’s GeekWeek

As you surely know by now, it’s GeekWeek on YouTube. But in case you haven’t been keeping up with every theme, today is Brainiac Tuesday, its focus on science, education and knowledge – a particularly relevant topic for readers of this blog, we think.

We didn’t see any particularly semantic videos pointed out in the Tuesday Highlights. The recommendation of Wired and YouTube’s “How to Make a Giant Robot Mech” fed some hopes, but looks like the big guy owes his smarts to a human pilot rather than artificial intelligence.

That’s not to say there isn’t good stuff among the pickings. Steve Spangler’s Favorite Experiments is a kick, for instance. And who knew that a volcano caused the French Revolution? But we’d like to hear it for semantic web, tech and related videos, too, on this Brainiac day.

To that end, here are a few of our own recommendations:

Global Corporate Networks Exposed through New Online Platform

World-wide interests of US banks first to be identified

Visualization of Goldman Sachs Corporate Network[Press Release] A new online platform launched today is set to provide free and open access to global corporate networks.

The platform, developed by OpenCorporates, collects, extracts and makes usable global corporate data, in an open and granular way. Large data sets, many of which were not available as open data before, have been imported by the London-based company, and used to develop corporate network visualisations which show the global corporate networks of businesses. Examples include IBM, Starbucks and Barclays.

In addition to the corporate network visualisations, the new technology has produced maps which show the world-wide interests of four US banks – Bank of America, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley. They reveal complex and deep networks, as well as the central position that the Cayman Islands have within them.

Chief Executive of OpenCorporate, Chris Taggart said:

Photo of Chris Taggart“This platform is an incredibly powerful and innovative piece of technology. Prior to its development, many of the datasets we are using were only available as web pages or PDFs. Now we are bringing this data together into a useable format which will change the way people are able to access and view corporate networks.”

“The emphasis we place on detailed provenance and confidence scores with this platform is substantially better than existing efforts to identify corporate networks, which are essentially ‘black boxes’. These hide the underlying data used to derive the relationship links, give no indication of how likely the information is to be correct, or the date the information related to. We believe that in a world which is increasingly dependent on corporate data, this is critical – whether you are an investigative journalist, or calculating credit risk.”

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Navigating The World Of Open Data On The Web

At a session discussing open data on the web at the Semantic Technology and Business Conference last week, W3C eGov consultant Phil Archer had this to say: That in his mind and the minds of the semantic web technology business people gathered at the event, “Open data is strongly associated with Linked Data, but the world doesn’t necessarily agree with us.”

What they are thinking about: “JSON and CSVs are the kings,” he said. “If you look at open data portals, CSVs [which get converted to JSON files] outweigh Linked Data by a mile,” he noted. And, he said, religious wars between those who see the world as triples vs. CSVs won’t be good for anyone. “If we keep telling the public sector to aim for 5-star data, vs. CSV 3-star data, we are in danger of the whole open data movement collapsing.”

No one wants that, and to address the big picture of realizing the promise of open data, April saw The Open Data on the Web workshop take place. It was organized by the W3C, the Open Data Institute, founded by Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Professor Nigel Shadbolt, and the Open Knowledge Foundation.

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Tim Berners-Lee, Vint Cerf & Others Win First Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

According to a new article, “Louis Pouzin, Robert Kahn, Vint Cerf, Tim Berners-Lee, [and] Marc Andreessen are the joint winners of the first Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. They have been awarded the prize for the ground-breaking work, starting in the 1970s, which led to the internet and worldwide web. The internet and worldwide web initiated a communications revolution which has changed the world.” Read more

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