Posts Tagged ‘Tim Berners-Lee’

First ODI Open Data Awards given to Wikidata, Others

Wikidata representatives, Lydia Pintscher and Magnus Manske  receiving award from Nigel Shadboldt and Tim Berners-Lee.19:30 GMT Tuesday 4th November 2014 –Four organisations and one individual have been acknowledged for their contribution to the worldwide open data movement in the very first Open Data Awards, held at the Open Data Institute’s Annual Summit and Gala Dinner.

The awards were presented by the ODI’s founders, Sir Tim Berners Lee and Sir Nigel Shadbolt in a ceremony attended by leaders from the business, data and technology worlds. Nominations for the awards were open to everyone and judged by a team of six including panelists from the USA and Pakistan. Read more

How the Semantic Web Will Change News

Old NewsPaul Sparrow of AJR.org recently wrote, “In his book ‘Weaving the Web,’ Tim Berners-Lee described the semantic web. ‘I have a dream for the Web [in which computers] become capable of analyzing all the data on the Web — the content, links, and transactions between people and computers. A ‘Semantic Web,’ which makes this possible, has yet to emerge, but when it does, the day-to-day mechanisms of trade, bureaucracy and our daily lives will be handled by machines talking to machines. The ‘intelligent agents’ people have touted for ages will finally materialize.’ The question is, will the provider of that customized information be a media company or a technology company? A new wave of change is sweeping the media landscape, and news organizations will need to make radical changes if they want to survive this tsunami of media transformation.” Read more

HTML5: The Party Is Officially On!

w3chtmlWord came from the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) yesterday that it has published the 5th major revision of HTML, the core language of the web. While HTML5 is already in use by developers (having become a W3C candidate recommendation a couple of years ago), the recommendation for the standard is a lynchpin for the community, as it now formalizes stable guidelines for the development of innovative and cross-platform web sites and applications.

A key feature of HTML5 – the first major new HTML standard in more than a decade – is that it provides the ability to describe the structure of a web document with standard semantics. It uses semantic tags for things like page headers, footers, body, ordered lists, time, and more to better identify an element and how it is being used. Greater use of these tags should improve a browser’s ability to understand content for display across a range of devices and screen sizes without requiring any development rejiggering, and search engines’ ability to more effectively index a page, which could lead to better rankings.

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Berners-Lee Shares Voices His Opinions on Data Ownership

timbernersleeAlex Hern of The Guardian reports, “The data we create about ourselves should be owned by each of us, not by the large companies that harvest it, the Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web, said today. Berners-Lee told the IPExpo Europe in London’s Excel Centre that the potential of big data will be wasted as its current owners use it to serve ever more ‘queasy’ targeted advertising. By gaining access to their own data, people could use it with information about themselves from other sources in order to create ‘rich data’ – a far more valuable commodity than mere ‘big data’, he said.”

Hern continues, “Berners-Lee said that ‘people only look at one angle’ of big data. ‘When you read big data pieces in a magazine, it’s about how big companies are spying on you. A lot of the marvel of big data is a threat to me. Read more

Tim Berners-Lee: What Kind of Internet Do We Want

timbernersleeExchange Magazine recently wrote, “Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago. So it’s worth a listen when he warns us: There’s a battle ahead. Eroding net neutrality, filter bubbles and centralizing corporate control all threaten the web’s wide-open spaces. It’s up to users to fight for the right to access and openness. The question is, What kind of Internet do we want? Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web. He leads the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), overseeing the Web’s standards and development.” Read more

HTTPA Will Let You Track How Your Private Data is Used

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Larry Hardesty of the MIT News Office reports, “By now, most people feel comfortable conducting financial transactions on the Web. The cryptographic schemes that protect online banking and credit card purchases have proven their reliability over decades. As more of our data moves online, a more pressing concern may be its inadvertent misuse by people authorized to access it. Every month seems to bring another story of private information accidentally leaked by governmental agencies or vendors of digital products or services. At the same time, tighter restrictions on access could undermine the whole point of sharing data. Coordination across agencies and providers could be the key to quality medical care; you may want your family to be able to share the pictures you post on a social-networking site.” Read more

Rewarding Improved Access to Linked Data

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A new paper out of the Semantic Web journal shares a proposed system, Five Stars of Linked Data Vocabulary Use. The paper was written by Krzysztof Janowicz, Pascal Hitzler, Benjamin Adams, Dave Kolas, and Charles Vardeman II. The abstract states, “In 2010 Tim Berners-Lee introduced a 5 star rating to his Linked Data design issues page to encourage data publishers along the road to good Linked Data. What makes the star rating so effective is its simplicity, clarity, and a pinch of psychology — is your data 5 star?” Read more

The Web Is 25 — And The Semantic Web Has Been An Important Part Of It

web25NOTE: This post was updated at 5:40pm ET.

Today the Web celebrates its 25th birthday, and we celebrate the Semantic Web’s role in that milestone. And what a milestone it is: As of this month, the Indexed Web contains at least 2.31 billion pages, according to WorldWideWebSize.  

The Semantic Web Blog reached out to the World Wide Web Consortium’s current and former semantic leads to get their perspective on the roads The Semantic Web has traveled and the value it has so far brought to the Web’s table: Phil Archer, W3C Data Activity Lead coordinating work on the Semantic Web and related technologies; Ivan Herman, who last year transitioned roles at the W3C from Semantic Activity Lead to Digital Publishing Activity Lead; and Eric Miller, co-founder and president of Zepheira and the leader of the Semantic Web Initiative at the W3C until 2007.

While The Semantic Web came to the attention of the wider public in 2001, with the publication in The Scientific American of The Semantic Web by Tim Berners-Lee, James Hendler and Ora Lassila, Archer points out that “one could argue that the Semantic Web is 25 years old,” too. He cites Berners-Lee’s March 1989 paper, Information Management: A Proposal, that includes a diagram that shows relationships that are immediately recognizable as triples. “That’s how Tim envisaged it from Day 1,” Archer says.

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Open The Door To Bringing Linked Data To Real-World Projects

ld1Linked Data: Structured Data on the Web is now available in a soft-cover edition. The book, authored by David Wood, Marsha Zaidman, Luke Ruth, and Michael Hausenblas, and with a forward by Tim Berners-Lee, aims to give mainstream developers without previous experience with Linked Data practical techniques for integrating it into real-world projects, focusing on languages with which they’re likely to be familiar, such as JavaScript and Python.

Berners-Lee’s forward gets the ball rolling in a big way, making the case for Linked Data and its critical importance in the web ecosystem:“The Web of hypertext-linked documents is complemented by the very powerful Linked Web of Data.  Why linked?  Well, think of how the value of a Web page is very much a function of what it links to, as well as the inherent value of the information within the Web page. So it is — in a way even more so — also in the Semantic Web of Linked Data.  The data itself is valuable, but the links to other data make it much more so.”

The topic has clearly struck a nerve, Wood believes, noting that today we are “at a point where structured data on the web is getting tremendous play,” from Google’s Knowledge Graph to the Facebook Open Graph protocol, to the growing use of the schema.org vocabulary, to data still growing exponentially in the Linked Open Data Project, and more. “The industry is ready to talk about data and data processing in a way it never has been before,” he continues. There’s growing realization that Linked Data fits in with and nicely complements technologies in the data science realm, such as machine learning algorithms and Hadoop, such that “you can suddenly build things you never could before with a tiny team, and that’s pretty cool….No technology is sufficient in and of itself but combine them and you can do really powerful things.”

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ODI celebrates New Year OBE for Technical Director, Jeni Tennison

Photo of Jeni TennisonThe Open Data Institute has announced that Jeni Tennison has been awarded an OBE in the “Queen’s New Year Honours.”

For those not familiar, King George V created these honors on 4 June 1917, during World War I. The honor was intended to reward services to the war effort by civilians at home in the UK and servicemen in support positions. Today, they are awarded for prominent national or regional roles and to those making distinguished or notable contributions in their own specific areas of activity. There are three ranks to the honors: Commander (CBE), Officer (OBE) and Member (MBE). Tennison is being given the OBE.

The official release reads:

Open Data Institute (ODI) founders, Sir Nigel Shadbolt and Sir Tim Berners-Lee have warmly welcomed news that the organisation’s Technical Director, Jeni Tennison has received an OBE in the Queen’s New Year Honours.

Tennison, who grew up in Cambridge, first trained as a psychologist before gaining a PhD in collaborative ontology development from the University of Nottingham.

Before joining the ODI, she was the technical architect and lead developer for legislation.gov.uk, which pioneered the use of open data APIs within the public sector, set a new standard in the publication of legislation on the web, and formed the basis of The National Archives’ strategy for bringing the UK’s legislation up to date as open, public data.

Speaking about today’s Honour, ODI Chairman, Sir Nigel Shadbolt said: “Jeni inspires affection, loyalty and admiration in all who know her. She has a special blend of deep technical know how and an intuitive sense of what works in the world of the Web. In Jeni the ODI has a fantastic CTO and the open data community a great role model. It has been a privilege to work with her for over two decades and it is wonderful to see her recognised in this way.”

Before taking up her post at the ODI, Tennison worked with Shadbolt on the early linked data work on data.gov.uk, helping to engineer new standards for the publication of statistics as linked data; building APIs for geographic, transport and education data; and supporting the publication of public sector organograms as open data.

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