Posts Tagged ‘Turing Test’

Artificial Intelligence: What We Hoped For & What We’ve Gotten

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Michael C. Daconta of GCN recently wrote, “Over the last year, several developments on the artificial intelligence (AI) front have occurred that reflect our wildest fantasies and worst fears for this technology.  Here are a few examples: A battle continues to rage between MIT linguist Noam Chomsky and Google Director of Research Peter Norvig over the increased use of statistics and probability in AI.  Chomsky argued that the ‘new AI’ is merely mimicking behavior instead of unraveling the rules and processes of cognition.  On the other hand, Norvig takes a more practical, probabilistic approach, believing in AI’s suitability for natural language processing, for instance. Last month, CNBC reported that inventor Elon Musk and physicist Stephen Hawking expressed concerns about the future of AI, suggesting that there are dangers in the fledging AI market.  They made it easy to surmise they fear a Robopocalypse caused by AI run amok!” Read more

Does AI System Eugene Goostman Pass the Turing Test?

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Dante D’Orazio of The Verge reports, “Eugene Goostman seems like a typical 13-year-old Ukrainian boy — at least, that’s what a third of judges at a Turing Test competition this Saturday thought. Goostman says that he likes hamburgers and candy and that his father is a gynecologist, but it’s all a lie. This boy is a program created by computer engineers led by Russian Vladimir Veselov and Ukrainian Eugene Demchenko. That a third of judges were convinced that Goostman was a human is significant — at least 30 percent of judges must be swayed for a computer to pass the famous Turing Test. The test, created by legendary computer scientist Alan Turing in 1950, was designed to answer the question ‘Can machines think?’ and is a well-known staple of artificial intelligence studies.” Read more

Looking Back to Alan Turing and Forward to Thinking Machines

Tom Meltzer of Guardian.co.uk recently asked, how close are we to ‘thinking’ machines? He begins, “It is 100 years this week since the birth of the revered wartime codebreaker Alan Turing, and 67 years since he was awarded an OBE for leading the team, in Bletchley Park’s Hut 8, that cracked the German navy’s Enigma code. It has also now been 60 years since he was convicted for gross indecency, after admitting to being in a consensual same-sex relationship, and sentenced to chemical castration by means of regular injections of oestrogen, as an alternative to time in prison. It’s 58 years to the month since he killed himself, and just less than three years since a British prime minister saw fit to issue an official apology for his treatment.” Read more

AI Getting Closer to Passing Turing Test

Brandon Keim reports that the Turing Test may soon be passed. He writes, “One hundred years after Alan Turing was born, his eponymous test remains an elusive benchmark for artificial intelligence. Now, for the first time in decades, it’s possible to imagine a machine making the grade. Turing was one of the 20th century’s great mathematicians, a conceptual architect of modern computing whose codebreaking played a decisive part in World War II. His test, described in a seminal dawn-of-the-computer-age paper, was deceptively simple: If a machine could pass for human in conversation, the machine could be considered intelligent.” Read more