Posts Tagged ‘universal healthcare exchange language’

Get The Scoop On The Critical ABCs of RDF

semtechbiz-10th-125sqThere’s a chance to learn everything you should know about RDF to get the most value from the W3C standard model for data interchange at the 10th annual Semantic Technology & Business Conference in San Jose next month. David Booth, senior software architect at Hawaii Resource Group, will be hosting a session explaining how the standard’s unique capabilities can have a profound effect on projects that seek to connect data coming in from multiple sources.

“One of the assumptions that people make looking at RDF is that it is  analogous to any other data format, like JSON or XML,” says Booth, who is working at the Hawaii Research Group’s on a contract the firm has with the U.S. Department of Defense to use semantic web technologies to achieve healthcare data interoperability. “It isn’t.” RDF, he explains, isn’t just another data format – rather, it’s about the information content that is encoded in the format.

“The focus is different. It is on the meaning of data vs. the details of syntax,” he says.

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A Closer Look At SemTechBiz Startup Competition Winner: KnowMED And Its Clinical Discovery Platform

KnowMED walked away the big winner of the Semantic Start-Up Competition. The Semantic Web Blog caught up with CTO Matthew Vagnoni, MS, and CEO Jerry D. Scott to further discuss the company’s winning entry, the Clinical Discovery Platform, for helping the health care sector semantically integrate data and ask natural language questions of that data, to support clinical research and complex decision-making.

The problem that the health care industry at large faces of not being able to easily and efficiently integrate and share data across organizations’ borders is equally a challenge right within the institutions themselves. “Large modern health care organizations are somewhat insular,” says Vagnoni.

At Medical City Children’s Hospital in Dallas, as an example, there are three separate electronic health record systems just for its neonatal division. The diverse formats and vocabularies made it difficult to try to ask questions of this data for research or efficiency purposes. But within two months of deploying KnowMED’s Clinical Discovery Platform, Vagnoni says, most of the data was integrated into a single view, “so clinicians could interact with it almost like using Google. …We combined the data from all the different sources so that clinicians could go in and ask questions [that reflect] how they think, not how [the information] is in the data schema.”

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Working On Taking “RDF as the Universal Healthcare Exchange Language” from Proposal to Policy at SemTechBiz

The final session I attended at this week’s Semantic Technology and Business Conference in San Francisco was on a topic with perhaps the biggest potential impact of any topic covered this week. The panel was called RDF as a Universal Healthcare Exchange Language, and it offered the attendees of SemTechBiz a glimpse into what occurred at an invitation-only workshop earlier in the week on the same topic.

The impressive group of panelists consisted of David Booth, Senior Software Architect of KnowMED (the company that won the Start-Up Competition earlier this week); Stanley Huff, Chief Medical Informatics Officer at Intermountain Healthcare; Emory Fry, Founder of Cognitive Medical Systems; Conor Dowling, CTO of Caregraf; and Josh Mandel, Research Faculty for the Children’s Hospital Informatics Program at Harvard-MIT. The panelists prefaced their discussion quite elegantly in their description of the session:

“Healthcare information resides and continues to rapidly grow in a bewildering variety of vocabularies, formats and systems in thousands of organizations. This makes the exchange and integration of healthcare information exceedingly difficult. It inhibits access to complete and accurate patient data, undermines the key advantage of having patient data in electronic form, and drives up the already high cost of healthcare. Read more