Posts Tagged ‘University of Pittsburgh’

Semantic Web Jobs: University of Pittsburgh

The University of Pittsburgh School of Information Sciences is looking for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Web Science in Pittsburgh, PA. According to the post, the candidate should have deep knowledge of “Data-intensive scholarship; Information visualization; Data mining; Semantic web; [and] Web engineering.” It states, “The University of Pittsburgh has been designated as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education and Research by the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security, while the iSchool security curriculum has been certified by the Committee on National System Security (CNSS) as meeting the national standards for information security education. In Web Science, numerous opportunities exist for collaboration on large-scale Web Service projects, including collaboration with the Center for Biomedical Informatics and the Intelligent Systems Program at Pitt.” Read more

Resunate Acquired By Professional Diversity Network For Its Semantic Career Smarts

Careerimp and its semantic technology for building and improving resumes to match a job’s requirements has itself secured a new gig – it’s been acquired by Chicago-based Professional Diversity Network, a provider of professional networking and job boards solutions.

Resunate, which The Semantic Web Blog first covered here, has had as its target market university career centers, with a client list that includes among others Carnegie Mellon (where the technology has its roots) and the University of Pittsburgh (whose Library System recently signed on as a customer for Plum Analytics’ RDF-modeled Researcher Graph). CareerImp has been updating the Semantic Intelligence technology behind the solution – which  analyses the sentences in a resume and job description based on the way words are clustered and their context, and weights things to statistically determine how relevant a resume is to a job or vice versa – every couple of weeks since its debut in Spring 2011 with a focus on providing content suggestions.

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Researcher Graph Helps Academics, Institutions Understand Works’ Influence

The “publish or perish” model of the academic world has pretty much followed the same pattern since the middle of the last century. It’s about a seven-year time-span from the a researcher’s original “ah-ha” moment, to the publishing of her paper, to the point where a critical mass of citations are formally gathered around it, as others read the work and cite it in their own research, says Andrea Michalek, co-founder of startup Plum Analytics.

“Clearly the world moves much, much faster than that now,” she says, with researchers posting slides online of talks about their work even before it’s published, and tweets referencing those discussions and linking back to the content, for example. “All this data exhaust is happening in advance of researchers’ getting those cited-by counts,” she says, and once a paper is published, the opportunities for online references to it grow.

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