Posts Tagged ‘vocabularies’

Getty Releases More Linked Open Data: Thesaurus of Geographic Names

Linked Open Data - Getty VocabulariesLast winter, SemanticWeb reported that the Getty Research Institute had released the first of four Getty vocabularies as Linked Open Data. Recently, the Getty revealed that it had unveiled its second. James Cuno wrote, “We’re delighted to announce that the Getty Research Institute has released the Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names (TGN)® as Linked Open Data. This represents an important step in the Getty’s ongoing work to make our knowledge resources freely available to all. Following the release of the Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT)® in February, TGN is now the second of the four Getty vocabularies to be made entirely free to download, share, and modify. Both data sets are available for download at vocab.getty.edu under an Open Data Commons Attribution License (ODC BY 1.0).”

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First of Four Getty Vocabularies Made Available as Linked Open Data

Getty Vocabularies - Linked Open Data logoJim Cuno, the President and CEO of the Getty, announced yesterday that the Getty Research Institute has released the Art & Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) ® as Linked Open Data. Cuno said, “The Art & Architecture Thesaurus is a reference of over 250,000 terms on art and architectural history, styles, and techniques. It’s one of the Getty Research Institute’s four Getty Vocabularies, a collection of databases that serves as the premier resource for cultural heritage terms, artists’ names, and geographical information, reflecting over 30 years of collaborative scholarship.”

The data set is available for download at vocab.getty.edu under an Open Data Commons Attribution License (ODC BY 1.0). Vocab.getty.edu offers a SPARQL endpoint, as well as links to the Getty’s Semantic Representation documentation, the Getty Ontology, links for downloading the full data sets, and more.

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New Vocabularies Are Now W3C Recommendations

W3C LogoWe reported yesterday on the news that JSON-LD has reached Recommendation status at W3C. Three formal vocabularies also reached that important milestone yesterday:

The W3C Documentation for The Data Catalog Vocabulary (DCAT), says that DCAT “is an RDF vocabulary designed to facilitate interoperability between data catalogs published on the Web….By using DCAT to describe datasets in data catalogs, publishers increase discoverability and enable applications easily to consume metadata from multiple catalogs. It further enables decentralized publishing of catalogs and facilitates federated dataset search across sites. Aggregated DCAT metadata can serve as a manifest file to facilitate digital preservation.”

Meanwhile, The RDF Data Cube Vocabulary  addresses the following issue: “There are many situations where it would be useful to be able to publish multi-dimensional data, such as statistics, on the web in such a way that it can be linked to related data sets and concepts. The Data Cube vocabulary provides a means to do this using the W3C RDF (Resource Description Framework) standard. The model underpinning the Data Cube vocabulary is compatible with the cube model that underlies SDMX (Statistical Data and Metadata eXchange), an ISO standard for exchanging and sharing statistical data and metadata among organizations. The Data Cube vocabulary is a core foundation which supports extension vocabularies to enable publication of other aspects of statistical data flows or other multidimensional data sets.”

Lastly, W3C now recommends use of the Organization Ontology, “a core ontology for organizational structures, aimed at supporting linked data publishing of organizational information across a number of domains. It is designed to allow domain-specific extensions to add classification of organizations and roles, as well as extensions to support neighbouring information such as organizational activities.”

 

WEBCAST: Introduction to SKOS with Bob DuCharme

If you missed the excellent live webcast introduction to SKOS by Bob DuCharme (of TopQuadrant and the recently released Learning SPARQL), the recorded webcast is now available.

Introduction to SKOS by Bob DuCharme - click to watch the webcast.

You will probably find this webcast useful if: Read more

Upcoming Webcast: “Introduction to SKOS” with Bob DuCharme

Date: Thursday, October 6, 2011
Register Now
Time: 2:00pm ET / 11:00am PT
Cost: FREE

In August, we had the pleasure of hosting the excellent instructor, Bob DuCharme, as he walked us through an introduction to SPARQL: “SPARQL Queries, SPARQL Technology.” Next week, Bob will join us again, this time to introduce us to SKOS, the Simple Knowledge Organization System standard.

Description:

You manage a taxonomy, thesaurus, or some other kind of controlled vocabulary using a proprietary tool or perhaps even by emailing around spreadsheets to each other. Read more

Linking Disparate Data in Manufacturing

A recent article from Inforbix discusses the difficulties of linking data in manufacturing businesses. The article notes, “Product data in all its forms is located and sourced in different places in manufacturing companies.  Accessing product data is, moreover, confounded by how different systems deploy different methodologies (or languages) for how they keep track of it.  For example, an item known in engineering as a ‘Part’ may be called a ‘Component’ in production… What I’m trying to say here is that the mixture of different vocabularies or vernacular used in a typical manufacturing company makes it difficult for different systems to have a macro understanding of how product data located in different places is connected together.” Read more

Semantics in the Public Library

A recent article from LibConf.com discusses the implementation of semantic web technologies in public libraries. The article begins, “Why do we need a new Web?  We often forget the kinds of problems we have with the tools available to us, such as high recall and low precision with Google.  The web is very vocabulary dependent.  Today’s Web search engines do not group web pages, pull out concepts, or understand them.  There is no access to the deep web.”

This is where the semantic web comes in: “We do have tools that can handle complex queries such as Scopus.  These search engines can do this because they have clearly tagged relational databases on the back end.  The semantic web solution is to turn the Web into something like a database, with structured data, controlled vocabularies, and linking.  The point is to create machine-actionable data because computers visit websites as often as people do.” Read more