Posts Tagged ‘W3C’

Semantic Web Veteran, Richard Cyganiak, Joins TopQuadrant

TopQuadrantRALEIGH, NC – December 16, 2014 – TopQuadrant™, a leading enterprise metadata and semantic data integration company, today announced that Richard Cyganiak has joined the technology team to further the company’s commitment to helping organizations realize the business value of Semantic Web technology and linked data.

“I have spent most of my career on the research side and have always been fascinated by the Semantic Web’s well thought-out, beautiful collection of technologies,” said Cyganiak. “As one of the more mature companies in this space, TopQuadrant has been committed to practical application of these technologies to solve business problems for quite some time. Read more

Introducing schema.org Version 1.92

schema dot org logoThe official blog of schema.org yesterday announced the release of version 1.92 of schema.org. The post, by Dan Brickley, states, “With this update we ‘soft launch’ a substantial collection of improvements that will form the basis for a schema.org version 2.0 release in early 2015. There remain a number of site-wide improvements, bugfixes and clarifications that we’d like to make before we feel ready to use the name ‘v2.0’. However the core vocabulary improvements are stable and available for use from today. As usual see the release notes page for details.” Read more

What’s Next for the W3C?

W3C LogoJack Schofield of ZDnet recently wrote, “HTML 5.1 is well under way and should become a Recommendation in 2016, and a first working draft of HTML 5.2 is expected next year. In sum, HTML 5 will continue for some time, and I don’t see any prospect of an HTML 6. However, there are clearly lots of things that don’t fit under the HTML 5 umbrella, even the broad version that subsumes separate but associated things like CSS. How will those be developed, and what will the new project be called?” Read more

Web Components: Even Better With Semantic Markup

W3C LogoThe W3C’s Web Components model is positioned to solve many of the problems that beset web developers today. “Developers are longing for the ability to have reusable, declarative, expressive components,” says Brian Sletten, a specialist in semantic web and next-generation technologies, software architecture, API design, software development and security, and data science, and president of software consultancy Bosatsu Consulting, Inc.

Web Components should fulfill that longing: With Templates, Custom Elements, Shadow DOM, and Imports draft specifications (and thus still subject to change), developers get a set of specifications for creating their web applications and elements as a set of reusable components. While most browsers don’t yet support these specifications, there are Web Component projects like Polymer that enable developers who want to start taking advantage of these capabilities right away to build Web objects and applications atop the specs today.

“With this kind of structure in place, now there is a market for people to create components that can be reused across any HTML-based application or document,” Sletten says. “There will be an explosion of people building reusable components so that you and I can use those elements and don’t have to write a ton of obnoxious JavaScript to do certain things.”

That in itself is exciting, Sletten says, but even more so is the connection he made that semantic markup can be added to any web component.

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Nova Spivack Weighs In On an Open Standard for Cards

9739012031_1fe744c999_nNova Spivack, CEO of Bottlenose, recently opined in TechCrunch, “Cards are fast becoming the hot new design paradigm for mobile apps, but their importance goes far beyond mobile. Cards are modular, bite-sized content containers designed for easy consumption and interaction on small screens, but they are also a new metaphor for user-interaction that is spreading across all manner of other apps and content. The concept of cards emerged from the stream — the short content notifications layer of the Internet — which has been evolving since the early days of RSS, Atom and social media.” Read more

HTML5: The Party Is Officially On!

w3chtmlWord came from the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) yesterday that it has published the 5th major revision of HTML, the core language of the web. While HTML5 is already in use by developers (having become a W3C candidate recommendation a couple of years ago), the recommendation for the standard is a lynchpin for the community, as it now formalizes stable guidelines for the development of innovative and cross-platform web sites and applications.

A key feature of HTML5 – the first major new HTML standard in more than a decade – is that it provides the ability to describe the structure of a web document with standard semantics. It uses semantic tags for things like page headers, footers, body, ordered lists, time, and more to better identify an element and how it is being used. Greater use of these tags should improve a browser’s ability to understand content for display across a range of devices and screen sizes without requiring any development rejiggering, and search engines’ ability to more effectively index a page, which could lead to better rankings.

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Web Payments Interest Group Takes Flight

w3cdomainThe World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has launched an initiative to integrate payments seamlessly into the Open Web Platform, the collection of open technologies such as HTML, HTTP, and various APIs that enable the Web. It’s asking for industry stakeholders, such as banks, credit card companies, governments and others, to join the new Web Payments Interest Group, chaired by Erik Anderson (Bloomberg) and David Ezell (Association for Convenience & Fuel Retailing), to help deepen understanding of challenges and how to meet them with the appropriate solutions to move e-commerce forward, including on mobile devices.

The Interest Group’s goals include improving usability across devices and reducing the risk of fraud, as well as creating new opportunities for businesses and consumers in areas such as coupons and loyalty programs and crypto-currencies. On its agenda is creating a Web Payments Roadmap, determining Web Payments terminology, dealing with payment transaction messaging and identity, authentication and security. As part of its work, the new group is charged with creating a framework to ensure that Web applications can interface in standard ways with all current and future payment methods, and will encompass the full range of devices people use for online payments.

First up, the W3C says, is a focus on digital wallets, “which many in industry consider an effective way to reduce fraud and improve privacy by having users share sensitive information only with payment providers, rather than merchants,” according to the release. “In addition, wallets can simplify transactions from mobile devices and make it easier to integrate new payment innovations.”

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The Semantic Web’s Rocking, And There Ain’t No Stopping It Now

archerMake no mistake about it: The semantic web has been a success and that’s not about to stop now. That was essentially the message delivered by W3C Data Activity Lead Phil Archer, during his keynote address celebrating the semantic web’s ten years of achievement at last month’s Semantic Technology & Business Conference in San Jose.

After acknowledging that he’s heard it all about the semantic web being a failure, about it being rebranded as Linked Data and that being a failure too, he summed up those impressions in one distinctly British word: “Bollocks.” The list of successes ranged across the spectrum, from the use in federated data portals of the Data Catalog Vocabulary from the W3C’s Government Linked Data Working Group, to the 47-million triples strong Open Phacts pharmacology discovery platform, to all the job postings that come up on The Semantic Web Blog – including one recently for the J. Craig Venter Institute, named for the pioneer genomic researcher who sequenced the human genome, which is looking for a bioinformatics analyst with OWL expertise in his or her resume.

That’s just a taste of the many citations he offered of the semantic web’s successes to date, not least among them his own strong familiarity with Linked Data’s use in government, where the technologies, he said, are used “to make our government more efficient” by having one organization make an authoritative data set the others can link to to support data-sharing across agencies. (For the full view into Archer’s take on the semantic web’s successes, you can view the entire keynote here.)

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You Can Help Make Linked Data Core To The Future of Identity, Payment On The Web Platform

ld1At the end of September, The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) may approve the world’s first Web Payments Steering Group, to explore issues such as navigating around obstacles to seamless payments on the web and ways to better facilitate global transactions while respecting local laws. Identity and digital signatures have a role here, at the same time as they go beyond the realm of payment into privacy and other arenas. At the end of October, there also will be a W3C technical plenary, to discuss identity, graph normalization, digital signatures and payments technologies.

Expect Linked Data to come up in the context of both events, Manu Sporny told attendees at this August’s 10th annual Semantic Technology & Business conference in San Jose during his keynote address, entitled Building Linked Data Into the Core of the Web. “It is the foundational data model to build all this technology off of,” said Sporny, who is the founder and CEO of Digital Bazaar, which develops technology and services to make it easier to buy and sell digital content over the Internet. (See our stories about the company and its technology here.)  He also is founder and chair of the W3C Web Payments Community Group, chair of its RDFa Working Group, and founder, and chair and lead editor of the JSON-LD Community Group.

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W3C Publishes Linked Data Platform Best Practices and Guidelines

Photo of Arnaud Le Hors presenting the LDP at SemTechBiz 2014The W3C’s Linked Data Platform (LDP) Working Group has published a document outlining best practices and guidelines for implementing Linked Data Platform servers and clients. The document was edited by Cody Burleson, Base22, and Miguel Esteban Gutiérrez and Nandana Mihindukulasooriya of the Ontology Engineering Group, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.

For those new to LDP, SemanticWeb.com has recently published the following materials:

WEBINAR: “Getting Started with the Linked Data Platform (LDP)” with LDP Working Group Chair, Arnaud Le Hors, IBM (pictured above presenting LDP work at the SemTechBiz conference last week).

ARTICLE: “Introduction to: Linked Data Platform” by Cody Burleson, Base 22

Those ready to dive into the nuts and bolts of the document will find detailed guidance on topics such as:

  • Predicate URIs
  • Use of relative URIs
  • Hierarchy and container URIs
  • Working with fragments
  • Working with standard datatypes
  • Representing relationships between resources
  • Finding established vocabularies

…and much more. See the full document at http://www.w3.org/TR/ldp-bp/

SemanticWeb.com congratulates the Working Group on this step and looks forward to reporting on use cases and implementations of LDP.

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