Posts Tagged ‘web 3.0’

Chemical Semantics Gets $1.1M Grant to Open Up Data for Chemists

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Anthony Clark of Gainsville.com reports, “A Gainesville startup company received a $1.1 million federal grant to develop a Web portal for chemists to better share information over the next generation of the World Wide Web. Neil Ostlund, CEO of Chemical Semantics, said he learned of the grant from the Department of Energy on Friday. Chemical Semantics is developing a portal and software for computational chemists to publish and find data over the semantic web, also referred to as Web 3.0 or the web of data.”

 

Clark continues, “Chemical Semantics has created the semantic web vocabulary — or ontology — for computational chemistry called the Gainesville Core. Read more

Hello 2014 (Part 2)

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Courtesy: Flickr/faul

Picking up from where we left off yesterday, we continue exploring where 2014 may take us in the world of semantics, Linked and Smart Data, content analytics, and so much more.

Marco Neumann, CEO and co-founder, KONA and director, Lotico: On the technology side I am personally looking forward to make use of the new RDF1.1 implementations and the new SPARQL end-point deployment solutions in 2014 The Semantic Web idea is here to stay, though you might call it by a different name (again) in 2014.

Bill Roberts, CEO, Swirrl:   Looking forward to 2014, I see a growing use of Linked Data in open data ‘production’ systems, as opposed to proofs of concept, pilots and test systems.  I expect good progress on taking Linked Data out of the hands of specialists to be used by a broader group of data users.

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Hello 2014

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Courtesy: Flickr/Wonderlane

Yesterday we said a fond farewell to 2013. Today, we look ahead to the New Year, with the help, once again, of our panel of experts:

Phil Archer, Data Activity Lead, W3C:

For me the new Working Groups (WG) are the focus. I think the CSV on the Web WG is going to be an important step in making more data interoperable with Sem Web.

I’d also like to draw attention to the upcoming Linking Geospatial Data workshop in London in March. There have been lots of attempts to use Geospatial data with Linked Data, notably GeoSPARQL of course. But it’s not always easy. We need to make it easier to publish and use data that includes geocoding in some fashion along with the power and functionality of Geospatial Information systems. The workshop brings together W3C, OGC, the UK government [Linked Data Working Group], Ordnance Survey and the geospatial department at Google. It’s going to be big!

[And about] JSON-LD: It’s JSON so Web developers love it, and it’s RDF. I am hopeful that more and more JSON will actually be JSON-LD. Then everyone should be happy.

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Good-Bye 2013

Courtesy: Flickr/MadebyMark

Courtesy: Flickr/MadebyMark

As we prepare to greet the New Year, we take a look back at the year that was. Some of the leading voices in the semantic web/Linked Data/Web 3.0 and sentiment analytics space give us their thoughts on the highlights of 2013.

Read on:

 

Phil Archer, Data Activity Lead, W3C:

The completion and rapid adoption of the updated SPARQL specs, the use of Linked Data (LD) in life sciences, the adoption of LD by the European Commission, and governments in the UK, The Netherlands (NL) and more [stand out]. In other words, [we are seeing] the maturation and growing acknowledgement of the advantages of the technologies.

I contributed to a recent study into the use of Linked Data within governments. We spoke to various UK government departments as well as the UN FAO, the German National Library and more. The roadblocks and enablers section of the study (see here) is useful IMO.

Bottom line: Those organisations use LD because it suits them. It makes their own tasks easier, it allows them to fulfill their public tasks more effectively. They don’t do it to be cool, and they don’t do it to provide 5-Star Linked Data to others. They do it for hard headed and self-interested reasons.

Christine Connors, founder and information strategist, TriviumRLG:

What sticks out in my mind is the resource market: We’ve seen more “semantic technology” job postings, academic positions and M&A activity than I can remember in a long time. I think that this is a noteworthy trend if my assessment is accurate.

There’s also been a huge increase in the attentions of the librarian community, thanks to long-time work at the Library of Congress, from leading experts in that field and via schema.org.

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Ushering in Cyber 3.0

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John Trobough of Business 2 Community recently wrote, “From narrowband to broadband, from kilobits to gigabits, from talking people to talking things, the volume of data in the world has reached epic proportions… and it’s only the beginning. Data is entering and leaving enterprises at unprecedented rates, and is often stored and accessed from a range of locations, such as from smartphones and tablets, virtual servers or the cloud. As the Internet has evolved, so has cybersecurity and the need for increased data analytics. Humans can no longer keep up with the data driven world, but machines can. By enabling semantic Web’s automated, continuous machine learning to create context out of interactions and data, security efforts will have continuous visibility and better control over digital assets. This future of machine learning is known as Cyber 3.0.” Read more

The Battle for Dominance in Web 3.0

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Charles Silver of Wired recently wrote, “A new battle among the tech titans has begun. What are Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Oracle, IBM and a handful of others fighting over, using vast amounts of money, hardware and top talent as weapons? This battle is over. Who will solve the scalability and performance issues of semantic computing, the data model for Web 3.0 — its arrival has been predicted annually for years but, finally, it’s on the verge. Put another way, which titan will pull off this victory feat: transforming the all-knowing ‘Star Trek’ computer—which could find the answer to any question in the universe at warp speed — from television fantasy to everyday reality.” Read more

How the Semantic Web is Changing the Role of the Journalist

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David Amerland of Journalism.co.uk recently wrote, “The true effect of any change is measured by the depth of its impact rather than its scale. When it comes to semantic search and the semantic web however, both depth and scale become important. Google has famously announced that semantic search is the transition of search and the web from ‘strings to things’ and ‘websites to people’ respectively.  To quantify this change, consider that the web is being transformed from a place where anonymity and unaccountability were virtually synonymous and practically guaranteed, to a place where trust, authority and reputation are the only attributes that really matter.” Read more

The Semantic Spin On YouTube’s GeekWeek

As you surely know by now, it’s GeekWeek on YouTube. But in case you haven’t been keeping up with every theme, today is Brainiac Tuesday, its focus on science, education and knowledge – a particularly relevant topic for readers of this blog, we think.

We didn’t see any particularly semantic videos pointed out in the Tuesday Highlights. The recommendation of Wired and YouTube’s “How to Make a Giant Robot Mech” fed some hopes, but looks like the big guy owes his smarts to a human pilot rather than artificial intelligence.

That’s not to say there isn’t good stuff among the pickings. Steve Spangler’s Favorite Experiments is a kick, for instance. And who knew that a volcano caused the French Revolution? But we’d like to hear it for semantic web, tech and related videos, too, on this Brainiac day.

To that end, here are a few of our own recommendations:

Semantic Technologist Gets In On The Ground Floor

One of the exciting things about being a semantic technologist is the opportunity to be in on the ground floor of things as companies revamp, revise, and renew their infrastructures for the Web 3.0 world.

That’s the position that Keith DeWeese finds himself in. DeWeese recently moved from The Tribune Company, where he led efforts in applying semantic technology to the publisher’s content (see story here), to Ascend Learning, a company that provides technology-based education products with a focus on the healthcare sector.

There, as principal content architect he is again championing the power of semantic technology for online content. “What’s cool is that Ascend is in a state of redefining what it does, how it works, its whole platform,” DeWeese says. Ascend wants to be able to take people from the beginning stages of their career, when they’re learning the basics, and work with them throughout their life, so that as they progress in their careers and become more knowledgeable about their profession or specialization and work toward different exams, it’s got the tools to engage with them at that part of their lifecycle.

“It’s really great because there’s an openness and willingness to try different approaches to making content available to end users.”

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Mapping Data with the Semantic Web

Grace Nasri of the Huffington Post recently discussed how the Semantic Web is creating a push toward greater data mapping. She writes, “Web 2.0 has been largely about social sharing, collaboration and user-generated content — contributing to a more detailed web of information. But much of the information presented throughout the Web until recently has tended to be isolated content lacking relevant and dynamic context about how entities — including people, objects, interests, locations, events or decisions — are connected. As we move towards Web 3.0 and the Semantic Web — characterized by related, contextualized and personalized data — there’s a growing push for more robust context and relationship mapping. Several companies, from search engines to social networks, have already begun mapping and graphing the way their customers use, interact with and understand data.” Read more

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