Posts Tagged ‘yarcdata’

Semantic Web Jobs: YarcData

YarcData

YarcData is looking for a Functional Solutions Architect in Brighton. According to the post, “We have openings for a solution architect to build solutions for high growth data analytics segments in the Life Sciences markets. Work closely with customers and prospects to understand their business and technical requirements. Position, articulate and demonstrate YarcData’s value proposition for Big Data graph analytics and discovery. Rapidly prototype and build custom demos, proof of concepts and customer use-cases. Create solution templates and associated assets that can serve as basis of similar repeatable solutions in the Life Sciences industry. Provide advice and best practices to customers to architect and implement solutions on uRiKA.” Read more

Good-Bye 2013

Courtesy: Flickr/MadebyMark

Courtesy: Flickr/MadebyMark

As we prepare to greet the New Year, we take a look back at the year that was. Some of the leading voices in the semantic web/Linked Data/Web 3.0 and sentiment analytics space give us their thoughts on the highlights of 2013.

Read on:

 

Phil Archer, Data Activity Lead, W3C:

The completion and rapid adoption of the updated SPARQL specs, the use of Linked Data (LD) in life sciences, the adoption of LD by the European Commission, and governments in the UK, The Netherlands (NL) and more [stand out]. In other words, [we are seeing] the maturation and growing acknowledgement of the advantages of the technologies.

I contributed to a recent study into the use of Linked Data within governments. We spoke to various UK government departments as well as the UN FAO, the German National Library and more. The roadblocks and enablers section of the study (see here) is useful IMO.

Bottom line: Those organisations use LD because it suits them. It makes their own tasks easier, it allows them to fulfill their public tasks more effectively. They don’t do it to be cool, and they don’t do it to provide 5-Star Linked Data to others. They do it for hard headed and self-interested reasons.

Christine Connors, founder and information strategist, TriviumRLG:

What sticks out in my mind is the resource market: We’ve seen more “semantic technology” job postings, academic positions and M&A activity than I can remember in a long time. I think that this is a noteworthy trend if my assessment is accurate.

There’s also been a huge increase in the attentions of the librarian community, thanks to long-time work at the Library of Congress, from leading experts in that field and via schema.org.

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YarcData Software Update Points Out That The Sphere Of Semantic Influence Is Growing

YarcDataRecent updates to YarcData’s software for its Urika analytics appliance reflect the fact that the enterprise is starting to understand the impact that semantic technology has on turning Big Data into actual insights.

The latest update includes integration with more enterprise data discovery tools, including the visualization and business intelligence tools Centrifuge Visual Network Analytics and TIBCO Spotfire, as well as those based on SPARQL and RDF, JDBC, JSON, and Apache Jena. The goal is to streamline the process of getting data in and then being able to provide connectivity to the tools analysts use every day.

As customers see the value of using the appliance to gain business insight, they want to be able to more tightly integrate this technology into wider enterprise workflows and infrastructures, says Ramesh Menon, YarcData vice president, solutions. “Not only do you want data from all different enterprise sources to flow into the appliance easily, but the value of results is enhanced tremendously if the insights and the ability to use those insights are more broadly distributed inside the enterprise,” he says. “Instead of having one analyst write queries on the appliance, 200 analysts can use the appliance without necessarily knowing a lot about the underlying, or semantic, technology. They are able to use the front end or discovery tools they use on daily basis, not have to leave that interface, and still get the benefit of the Ureka appliance.”

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Semantic Web Jobs: YarcData

YarcData is looking for a Senior Web Developer in Pleasanton, CA. According to the post, “Are you a top-notch web developer? Do you want to play a key role working in a startup-like, fast paced and high growth environment? You can do that as a Senior Software Engineer on our development team located in Pleasanton CA. The team is focused on developing front end and middle tier interfaces using best of breed Web and Middle tier technologies. This role would focus on designing and implementing robust and scalable services and User Interfaces for web-based applications. In this role, you will be an accomplished developer, with applied knowledge of object-oriented design with appropriate use of best practices, design patterns, and frameworks and an appreciation of the implication of software designs and implementation choices on application performance and maintainability.” Read more

A Look Into Learning SPARQL With Author Bob DuCharme

Cover of Learning SPARQL - Second Edition, by Bob DuCharmeThe second edition of Bob DuCharme’s Learning SPARQL debuted this summer. The Semantic Web Blog connected with DuCharme – who is director of digital media solutions at TopQuadrant, the author of other works including XML: The Annotated Specification, and also a welcome speaker both at the Semantic Technology & Business Conference and our Semantic Web Blog podcasts – to learn more about the latest version of the book.

Semantic Web Blog: In what I believe has been two years since the first edition was published, what have been the most significant changes in the ‘SPARQL space’ – or the semantic web world at large — that make this the right time for an expanded edition of Learning SPARQL?

DuCharme: The key thing is that SPARQL 1.1 is now an actual W3C Recommendation. It was great to see it so widely implemented so early in its development process, which justified the release of the book’s first edition so long before 1.1 was set in stone, but now that it’s a Recommendation we can release an edition of the book that is no longer describing a moving target. Not much in SPARQL has changed since the first edition – the VALUES keyword replaced BINDINGS, with some tweaks, and some property path syntax details changed – but it’s good to know that nothing in 1.1 can change now.

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Big Data Goes to the Ballpark: The Next Generation of “Moneyball” at YarcData

“People are overlooked for a variety of biased reasons and perceived flaws. Age, appearance, personality. Bill James and mathematics cut straight through that. Billy, of the 20,000 notable players for us to consider, I believe that there is a championship team of twenty-five people that we can afford, because everyone else in baseball undervalues them.”

This was the thinking that Peter Brand (played by Jonah Hill in the movie Moneyball) brought to Billy Beane, General Manager of the Oakland Athletics in 2002. In the previous year, Beane’s team had made it to the postseason, but were defeated by the Yankees. The team then lost three star players to free agency, and Beane didn’t have the budget to replace them. But baseball analyst Brand showed him that Beane could do big things with his small budget, and as a result, the A’s went to the World Series the very next year.

Turning to data to find undervalued players didn’t stop with the A’s. Beane and Brand started a trend in baseball that changed the game forever, and the use of data has only gotten more complex and competitive as the types and amount of data have exploded over recent years.

This was the focus of Dean Allemang, Tim Harsch, and Amar Shan’s presentation at the recent SemTechBiz Conference, Big Data Analytics for Baseball. The three men from YarcData showed a roomful of baseball and semantic technology fans how in the current world of Big Data, RDF is not only a great solution for health care, government, and media organizations, but for America’s favorite pastime, as well. Read more

Helping Autism Researchers, And Others, With Some SPARQL Savvy

One in 50 American children have autism, according to the latest figures released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in March. One of the winners of the YarcData Graph Analytics Challenge, announced in April, can make a difference in better understanding the causes of the disease.

Taking second place in the competition, the work of Adam Lugowski, Dr. John Gilbert, and Kevin Dewesse, of the University of California at Santa Barbara, leveraged a dataset created for the Mayo Clinic Smackdown project, that has the same structure and property types – and scale – as the medical organization’s actual Big Data sets around autism, but which uses publicly available data in place of the real thing. The team can’t use the real data because it includes private information about patients, diagnosis, prescriptions, and the like.

But the actual data deployed for the project doesn’t matter, says Lugowski . “The goal is to find relationships we have never thought of before, and this way it doesn’t prejudice the algorithm,” he says. Using YarcData’s uRIKA graph analytics appliance, the algorithm queries the Smackdown dataset – which in its smallest version has almost 40 million RDF triples and in its largest is about 100 times bigger, mirroring the size of all the Mayo Clinic’s actual autism data – to discover commonalities among the data, mimicking how the real data sets could be queried in search of common precursors among clusters of patients with the diagnosis.

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YarcData Announces Winners of $100,000 Graph Analytics Challenge

YarcData LLC, a Cray company dedicated to providing “Big Data” graph-analytic solutions to enterprises, today announced the winners of the YarcData Graph Analytics Challenge showcasing the increasing applicability and adoption of graph analytics in discovering unknown relationships in Big Data. Submissions included an innovative range of applications across a broad variety of sectors including crime prediction, social science, life science and sports performance. Read more

YarcData Announces Finalists of Graph Analytics Challenge

YarcData has announced the finalists of the company’s Graph Analytics Challenge: “The top six entries for the contest, which features $100,000 in prizes including a $70,000 grand prize for the first place winner, were determined to have entered the best submissions for un-partitionable, Big Data graph problems. The top six submissions span a number of diverse categories, such as healthcare, law enforcement, sports, life sciences and social media.” Read more

Cray spin-off YarcData betting $100,000 on the power of graph data

Early in 2011, I wrote a piece here on SemanticWeb.com which explored the relationship between Semantic Technologies and super-computing’s venerable rock star, Cray. Then, earlier this year, Cray spun out a new division to focus upon exploring massive graph databases; something which should resonate with the semantic technology community. The new division — YarcData — differentiates itself quite clearly from its parent, leading with a data-led proposition and typically operating at quite a different pricepoint to its eye-wateringly expensive parent.

I sat down with YarcData President Arvind Parthasarathi during the Semantic Technology & Business Conference in San Francisco, to get an update on YarcData and to hear why the company is investing $100,000 in prizes for a new ‘Big Data Graph Analytics Challenge.’ Read more