Posts Tagged ‘YouTube’

Music Discovery Service seevl.fm Launches

screen shot of seevl.fm search: Lou ReedThis week marked the public launch of seevl.fm.

SemanticWeb.com has tracked seevl’s development through various incarnations, including a YouTube plugin and as a service for users of Deezer (available as a Deezer app). This week’s development, however, sees the service emerge as a stand-alone, cross-browser, cross-platform, mobile-ready service; a service that is free and allows for unlimited search and discovery. So, what can one do with seevl?

Following the death of Lou Reed this week, I (not surprisingly) saw mentions of the artist skyrocket across my social networks. People were sharing memories and seeking information — album and song titles, lyrics, biographies, who influenced Reed, who Reed influenced, and a lot of people simply wanted to listen to Reed’s music.  A quick look at the seevl.fm listing for Lou Reed shows a wealth of information including a music player pre-populated with some of the artist’s greatest hits.

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The Semantic Spin On YouTube’s GeekWeek

As you surely know by now, it’s GeekWeek on YouTube. But in case you haven’t been keeping up with every theme, today is Brainiac Tuesday, its focus on science, education and knowledge – a particularly relevant topic for readers of this blog, we think.

We didn’t see any particularly semantic videos pointed out in the Tuesday Highlights. The recommendation of Wired and YouTube’s “How to Make a Giant Robot Mech” fed some hopes, but looks like the big guy owes his smarts to a human pilot rather than artificial intelligence.

That’s not to say there isn’t good stuff among the pickings. Steve Spangler’s Favorite Experiments is a kick, for instance. And who knew that a volcano caused the French Revolution? But we’d like to hear it for semantic web, tech and related videos, too, on this Brainiac day.

To that end, here are a few of our own recommendations:

Semantic Video’s Banner Year

The BBC made use of semantic video annotation in its coverage of the 2012 Olympics

It’s fair to say that an good idea has finally “arrived” when it has left the realm of the theoretical and has become the foundation of a lot of popular tools, services, and applications.

That is surely the case with Semantic Video.

Gone are the days when internet video could best be described as a meaningless blob of content invisible to search and impossible to annotate and reuse in meaningful ways.

The past year has seen an explosion of practical (and popular) services and applications that are based upon the extraction of meaningful metadata– and often linked data– from video content.

For those of us lucky enough to view it, the BBC wowed us last July with its Olympic Coverage, broadcasting live every event of the Olympics on 24 HD streams, all accessible over the internet, with live, dynamic data and statistics on athletes.  To pull off this feat, the BBC used a custom-designed Dynamic Semantic Publishing platform which included fluid Operations’ Information Workbench to help author, curate and publish  ontology and instance data.

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Music To Your Ears: Seevl Takes First Step To Become Cross-Platform Music Discovery Service

Seevl, the free music discovery service that leverages semantic technology to help users conduct searches across a world of facts-in-combination to find new musical experiences and artist information, has launched an app for Deezer that will formally go live Monday.  (See our in-depth look at Seevl here, and a screencast of how the service works here.) Deezer is a music streaming service available in more than 150 countries – not the U.S. yet, though – that claims more than 20 million users.

Seevl, which late last year updated its YouTube plug-in with more music discovery features and better integration with the YouTube user interface, models its data in RDF. In a blog post earlier this year, founder and CEO Alexandre Passant explained how the Seevl service uses Redis for simple key-value queries and SPARQL for some more complex operations, like recommendations or social network analysis, as well as provenance. As for the new Deezer app, it provides the same features as the YouTube app for easily navigating and discovering music among millions of tracks, Passant tells the Semantic Web Blog.

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Freebase Catch-Up: Recent Developments On The Entity Graph Of People, Places, And Things

What’s new with Freebase? Well, aside from its data now being used by Bing to provide information about entities in a similar way to Google’s Knowledge Graph, a new design of its web client is being tested here.

Its post about the new design highlights these as a few of the client’s biggest changes:

* A search bar at the top of the screen lets you filter the topic display and show any by domain, type or property. When you filter by domain, the page will show all of the types and their properties linked to the current topic. When filtering by type, it will show just the properties within that type and filtering by property will show just that property.

Google TV 3.0: Knowledge-Graph Smart Platform Debuts On New TV Devices

In the fall Google updated its Google TV platform to Version 3.0, touting features like its new Voice Search. This week, expect to hear about a slew of new products with the technology onboard launching at the CES show in Las Vegas.

Google recently reported on its Google TV blog that new partners added to its Google TV list include Asus, Hisense, and TCL.  LG, Sony, Vizio and others will have refreshes of their set-top boxes, integrated TVs, and IPTV boxes with the latest Google TV platform on board.

Consumers that buy into these offerings also will be increasing their exposure to Google’s Knowledge Graph. The Google TV platform’s advanced voice control for changing channels or finding content of personal interest to watch (live or via Internet streaming), its new programming guide app, and its other smarts deliver results with the help of the vendor’s own Knowledge Graph, according to GIGAOM. With the Knowledge Graph, search queries run against a database of entities and relationships — it’s the search engine’s way of, as Google says, understanding “things, not strings.”

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With MarkLogic Search Technology, Factiva Enables Standardized Search And Improved Experiences Across Dow Jones Digital Network,

Dow Jones & Company’s Factiva information service has long been distinguished by the semantic tools it applies to its content to surface relevant search information. Last week the company announced what it says is one of the most significant investments it’s made in the Factiva product suite, licensing new search technology from MarkLogic Corp.

The arrangement is positioned as providing standardized search technology across the Dow Jones digital network, including Factiva, WSJ.com and Dow Jones Financial Services products. To be specific, the investment in one underlying search technology that will be used by the company’s multiple businesses and products means that, “one powerful, unified search platform will service the search needs of our consumer and enterprise customers around the world,” says Georgene Huang, head of Factiva. “Any improvements or customizations we build atop this infrastructure will be scalable and efficiently accessible to all.” That will allow better and easier synergies between the development, products and the content, she says.

The new search technology, Huang says, complements its continuing investment in Factiva’s core metadata and taxonomy strengths in many ways.

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Digital Marketers: Time To Get More Savvy With Social Media

The Digital Channel Intelligence (DCI) Solution unveiled last week by enterprise social intelligence vendor NetBase aims to make conversations on social channels more useful to the brands and agencies that hope to gain insight from that commentary. In a world where digital marketing is swiftly becoming entrenched in most businesses, NetBase says that DCI will offer a comprehensive, real-time picture of what’s happening across forums ranging from Facebook, to Twitter, to YouTube, to Pinterest and others. It will provide a way for digital marketers to roll up key metrics specific to each one (community growth, amplification and conversation rates, for example, as well as total impressions generated), integrating actionable insights from the broader social web. That includes providing an understanding of what fans and followers are saying to help feed digital marketing decisions and direction.

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Volume, Emotion, Sponsorship: What Brands Have An Edge on Social Media Strategies?

Market Strategies International recently released the first edition of what it says will be an annual Social Media Brand Index, a measure for brands both of consumer-generated social media about them and of their own sponsored content. The Index takes into account four components. Volume, or the amount of buzz about a brand online, is one of them — and its most highly weighted component, too. The others take their cue from what we might call more meaning-related measures, sentiment analytics and semantic markup among them.

For example, there’s net Sentiment, which Market Strategies says represents the ratio of positive to negative sentiments expressed about a brand based on automated natural language processing of the content of posts, comments and mentions. Another component, Positive Emotions, seems to flow from that measure, representing the number of content items that are identified as having the warm fuzzies about them, again based on automated coding of content.

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StreamGlider iPad News Reader App Will Evolve To Help Businesses Correlate Diverse Data Sets

The latest version of the StreamGlider iPad news reader app for providing consumers with topic-oriented streams of information debuted this week. It brought with it the capability to limit hashtag or keyword searches in a Twitter, YouTube, or Flickr frame to a local area and turn on geo-awareness at the user’s request. But the bigger and more semantic event will be StreamGlider’s upcoming move to the enterprise, with the consumer app serving as a showcase to those potential customers.

StreamGlider CEO Bill McDaniel – also CEO of SemantiStar, which developed the application that The Semantic Web Blog first covered here and here – says to expect in the enterprise edition a very interesting semantic search/semantic relations engine in the background for correlating up to three data sets of semi-structured, unstructured and structured data. The company already is working with one client on a specific application of the generic technology for its custom needs, and talking to a second customer about a pilot around the idea.

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