Jerry Persons, Chief Information Architect emeritus at Stanford, recently wrote an article discussing the current linked data landscape. He begins, “The ecosystem in which both library-generated metadata and vendor-generated search environments are players has changed radically with unprecedented swiftness: search engines continue to morph, witness Bing, WolframAlpha, Siri; Google surfaces its things not strings work as Knowledge Graph; schema.org announces a W3C vehicle to extend its core vocabulary; Microsoft’s Academic Search provides glimpses of new ways to find connections; Nature Publishing Group initiates linked-data access to some of its metadata; the BNB and Harvard’s cataloging come out of the closet as CC0 data; many national libraries release CC0 bibliographic and authority data; [etc.]“

He also states, “My own views on the potential benefits to be had from a rapidly evolving web that is increasingly dominated by well-structured and well-curated data were shaped in large part by exposure to the vision, concepts, and people involved in a set of antecedents to the current flurry of activity and developments.  The thread leads from a turn of the century piece written by Danny Hillis, through his Applied Minds and Metaweb companies, leading to Freebase and John Giannandrea, and onward from there to the recent Wall Street Journal interview with Amit Singhal and the subsequent discussions surrounding Knowledge Graph and things not strings.”

Read more here.

Image: Courtesy Flickr/ See-ming Lee 李思明 SML