We report regularly on the Twitter Annotations story as it unfolds. But if you are new to this subject, you may just want a quick introduction and links to further research. Then the current news that we report on will make more sense.

This post is your introduction to Twitter Annotations. You will find links to further research, which we will keep up to date.

Twitter Annotations explained in a tweet: Can add many annotations to a tweet: “type”:{“attribute”:”value”} e.g. “movie”:{“title”:”Avatar”}

Thanks, John Breslin

If you just want the 101 version for the super-busy, here is our version:

You can embed metatada in a Tweet, outside the 140 character limit, subject to these basic technical constraints:

1. A tweet can have one or more annotation
2. Tweets can have more than one annotation of the same type
3. Annotations of the same type are still separate annotations
4. The attribute names in a given annotation may only occur once in a given annotation (the same restrictions as a conventional hash map)
5. Annotations have to be described within 512 bytes. This may get increased to 2k.
6. The early uses are likely to be for links and photos. But Annotations may turn Twitter into a real time web message bus and that is where there is big potential.

If you are reasonably technical and want to understand the fundamentals, Twitter’s API site is the best starting point. This is edited by Ryan Sarver regularly. There is a Google Group, but it does not have many updates (so the Twitter API site is a better resource).

If you come from a Semantic Web world and want to look at this in the context of standards such as RDF, Andy Murdoch’s post is good.

If you want to go a bit deeper and like to absorb information by video, this 25 minute video from Raffi Krikorian, one of the tech leads on the Twitter Platform is good:

Raffi Krikorian’s Extremely Preliminary Look at Twitter’s Annotations from Farhan Rehman on Vimeo.

If you want to read the tech blogs commentary, here are the best posts from Mashable, Read Write Web, Techcrunch, GigaOm, Venture Beat, Social Times and our very own SemanticWeb.com.

How you look at Twitter Annotations, will depend on where you are coming from and what you want to achieve. Here are some more specialist points of view (all from SemanticWeb.com unless otherwise noted):

SEO (Search Engine Optimization)

• Enterprise 2.0 SocialText use, our take and Read Write Web’s take.

SEO (Search Engine Optimization)

Ecommerce.

Job Search & Job Boards.

What have we missed? Please tell us any good sources in comments so we can keep this up to date.

———————————————————————–
CONVERT BREAKS: __default__

We report regularly on the Twitter Annotations story as it unfolds. But if you are new to this subject, you may just want a quick introduction and links to further research. Then the current news that we report on will make more sense.

This post is your introduction to Twitter Annotations. You will find links to further research, which we will keep up to date.

Twitter Annotations explained in a tweet: Can add many annotations to a tweet: “type”:{“attribute”:”value”} e.g. “movie”:{“title”:”Avatar”}

Thanks, John Breslin

If you just want the 101 version for the super-busy, here is our version:

You can embed metatada in a Tweet, outside the 140 character limit, subject to these basic technical constraints:

1. A tweet can have one or more annotation
2. Tweets can have more than one annotation of the same type
3. Annotations of the same type are still separate annotations
4. The attribute names in a given annotation may only occur once in a given annotation (the same restrictions as a conventional hash map)
5. Annotations have to be described within 512 bytes. This may get increased to 2k.
6. The early uses are likely to be for links and photos. But Annotations may turn Twitter into a real time web message bus and that is where there is big potential.

If you are reasonably technical and want to understand the fundamentals, Twitter’s API site is the best starting point. This is edited by Ryan Sarver regularly. There is a Google Group, but it does not have many updates (so the Twitter API site is a better resource).

If you come from a Semantic Web world and want to look at this in the context of standards such as RDF, Andy Murdoch’s post is good.

If you want to go a bit deeper and like to absorb information by video, this 25 minute video from Raffi Krikorian, one of the tech leads on the Twitter Platform is good:

Raffi Krikorian’s Extremely Preliminary Look at Twitter’s Annotations from Farhan Rehman on Vimeo.

If you want to read the tech blogs commentary, here are the best posts from Mashable, Read Write Web, Techcrunch, GigaOm, Venture Beat, Social Times and our very own SemanticWeb.com.

How you look at Twitter Annotations, will depend on where you are coming from and what you want to achieve. Here are some more specialist points of view (all from SemanticWeb.com unless otherwise noted):

SEO (Search Engine Optimization)

• Enterprise 2.0 SocialText use, our take and Read Write Web’s take.

SEO (Search Engine Optimization)

Ecommerce.

Job Search & Job Boards.

What have we missed? Please tell us any good sources in comments so we can keep this up to date.

———————————————————————–
• Don’t forget to propose your startup for our Semantic Web Impact Awards. The deadline is Sept. 15.

RELATED: